anti semitism – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 04:58:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.jewsformorality.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T151402.937-150x150.png anti semitism – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ 32 32 Building Jewish Pride in South Africa and Beyond: An Interview with Chief Rabbi Warren Goldstein | The Jewish Press – JewishPress.com | Eve Glover | 14 Adar II 5782 – March 17, 2022 http://www.jewsformorality.org/building-jewish-pride-in-south-africa-and-beyond-an-interview-with-chief-rabbi-warren-goldstein-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-eve-glover-14-adar-ii-5782-march-17-2022/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 04:58:34 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/building-jewish-pride-in-south-africa-and-beyond-an-interview-with-chief-rabbi-warren-goldstein-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-eve-glover-14-adar-ii-5782-march-17-2022/ Photo credit: Courtesy Rabbi Warren Goldstein Like many other South African Jews, Rabbi Dr. Warren Goldstein’s great-grandparents emigrated from Lithuania. Born in 1971, Rabbi Goldstein grew up in Pretoria and became South Africa’s youngest appointed chief rabbi when he began serving in January 2005. Rabbi Goldstein attended Jewish day school and then Yeshiva Gedolah in […]]]>

Photo credit: Courtesy

Rabbi Warren Goldstein

Like many other South African Jews, Rabbi Dr. Warren Goldstein’s great-grandparents emigrated from Lithuania. Born in 1971, Rabbi Goldstein grew up in Pretoria and became South Africa’s youngest appointed chief rabbi when he began serving in January 2005.

Rabbi Goldstein attended Jewish day school and then Yeshiva Gedolah in Johannesburg, where he was ordained a rabbi. His father is a retired High Court judge, and while the young Goldstein served as a synagogue rabbi, he followed in his father’s footsteps by earning a postgraduate law degree and a doctorate. in human rights and constitutional law from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. He is also qualified day by the Eretz Hemda Institute in Jerusalem.

A well-published writer, Rabbi Goldstein is the author of several books, including Defend the human spirit and a Hebrew book on halakha competition law. He co-wrote Discussion on the African soul with Dumani Mandela, Nelson Mandela’s grandson, and The legacy with Rabbi Berel Wein, which consists of examining the philosophy of the great Lithuanian rabbis.

The Jewish press spoke to Chief Rabbi Goldstein about his remarkable achievements in outreach and interfaith communication, and his perspective on the state of the Jewish community in South Africa and around the world.

The Jewish press: Could you tell us about some of the human rights initiatives you have implemented?

Rabbi Goldstein: CAP (Community Active Protection) aims to protect people from the trauma of violent crime. It was created about 15 years ago [in South Africa] and has reduced violent crime in its areas of operation by between 80 and 90%. We are in the process of implementing a major expansion program to bring CAP to millions of people in Johannesburg. Another human rights initiative that I founded, drawing on Torah values, is the national “Charter of Responsibilities”. Adopted by South Africa’s Department of Education and taught in schools across the country, the Bill of Responsibilities functions as a corollary to our Constitution’s famous Bill of Rights and reflects the fundamental Jewish belief that every right is comes with responsibility. The initiative has shown a new generation of young South Africans the importance of compassion and respect for the dignity and well-being of others.

As a religious leader, how have you encouraged young people to discover the values ​​of Torah?

I initiated the Beit Midrash program that brought in-depth, text-based learning of Judaism to our Jewish day schools. Then there is Generation Sinai, a platform for parents and children to connect and learn the ideas of Torah with each other. There’s also Sinai Indaba, an annual Torah-learning convention that brings together leading international Jewish thinkers and speakers and thousands of South African Jews of all persuasions. And of course, the Shabbat Project, which brings together Jews of all backgrounds around the world and allows them to keep a full Shabbat together.

I know that the Shabbat project takes place once a year, after Sukkot. Could you tell us more about what made it successful? When did it start?

It was introduced in 2013 in South Africa. Initially, it was not planned to make it a global project. My wife and I created a YouTube video explaining the project, and suddenly emails were pouring in from all corners of the globe from people wanting to participate. Almost overnight, it seems, a movement sprung up from the ground. We all crave connection right now – within our families, with friends, with communities, with ourselves, with Gd. It’s so amazing that Shabbat, which was created at the beginning of time, turns out to be the perfect formula for everything we need in modern life. It was designed by Gd, who created us, and therefore knows what we need to thrive. He has given us this incredible Shabbat gift, and The Shabbat Project’s vision is to share this gift with as many Jews as possible. It is now widespread in more than 1,500 cities and 100 countries around the world. We have 5,000 volunteers around the world helping to deliver the project on the ground.

Given that Project Shabbat could only be practiced at home in 2020 due to Covid lockdowns, did you see a surge of interest in it last year when restrictions started to ease?

Absoutely. In 2021, we saw record participation levels. There was a renewed thirst for human reconnection, which, along with the magic of Shabbat itself, really fueled the Shabbat project.

Have you had any new realizations about this project after seeing how many people around the world have embraced it?

What I have learned from the Shabbat Project over the years is that I do not accept any definition of a Jew as secular. There’s this deep connection to who we are and where we come from, and Shabbat goes right to the heart of that identity. This year there was a whole bunch of Instagram influencers in Israel who you would call secular by any definition, but when you hear them talking about Shabbat and what it means to them, you should completely revise that definition.

The project has touched so many lives – from Jews in the former Soviet Union cut off from Judaism for decades, to fashion moguls in Paris, to award-winning actors and musicians, to Jews in remote places where there is no no Jewish communities. This is the power of Shabbat.

What is the religious climate in South Africa?

The National Council of Religious Leaders (NRLC) is a very important body in the country because it is the space for the development of inter-religious relations. I sit on the central committee, which oversees its work. My colleagues from other faith communities represent the Muslim, Christian and Hindu communities. South Africa is a very religious country. For example, at any presidential inauguration or opening of parliament, prayers are said by a cross section of religious leaders. The country is predominantly Christian. Many large churches here are pro-Israel.

Could you talk about the state of anti-Semitism in South Africa in general and on university campuses?

There is a strong anti-Israeli BDS movement in South Africa. It is causing the same kind of harm in South Africa as it is on campuses in the United States and around the world. But the rate of actual anti-Semitic incidents is among the lowest in the world. The South African Jewish community is very Zionist and we are on the front lines of defending Israel against these attacks. The ANC (African National Congress), the country’s ruling party, has a reputation for being very anti-Israeli. But the South African population, in my experience, is not. My impression is that the vast majority of South Africans, in fact, do not support BDS. On the contrary, many, many are fiercely pro-Israel.

Coming from South Africa, where apartheid was such an important part of your country’s history, what do you think of Israel’s accusation of being an apartheid state?

Having grown up in apartheid South Africa, I know what apartheid is. Because of this, I have written and campaigned extensively around this issue, arguing forcefully that Israel is not an apartheid state. To me, this accusation is deeply offensive, both as a South African and as a Jew. As a South African it is an insult to the victims of true apartheid, and as a Jew it is a defamation of the Jewish state. It’s a complete lie. I wrote an open letter to President Ramaphosa, challenging him, laying out the facts, telling him that he was completely wrong in implying that Israel was an apartheid state.

What is the current state of relations between the South African government and the Israeli government?

There are diplomatic relations, and a new Israeli ambassador has just arrived in South Africa, but it’s definitely a strained relationship. The South African government is really out of step with its own people, the majority of whom, as I said, see Israel in an extremely positive light. I gave a speech to President Ramaphosa at the Gardens Synagogue in Cape Town three years ago, in which I challenged him on his government’s Israeli policies.

Would you say the manufacturing rates of South African Jews aliyah are they high or low right now?

They are high – probably among the highest in the world. In 2021, there were more than 500 new olim. We are a very Zionist community, I can say that with pride.

Could you share some thoughts on the former Chief Rabbi of the United Kingdom Jonathan Sacks, who died in 2020 at the age of 72, and the impact he had on you?

I considered Rabbi Lord Sacks a dear friend and colleague. He was always very kind with his time, wisdom and advice. When I was appointed chief rabbi, he was one of the very first people to contact me to congratulate me, but also to support me. He was one of the few people in the world I could talk to who understood what it was like to be a great rabbi. Apart from [that] obviously, Rabbi Sacks was such an eloquent and profound spokesman for Torah thought in the world.

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Critique of “The Moisés Ville Murders”: A Forgotten “Jerusalem” http://www.jewsformorality.org/critique-of-the-moises-ville-murders-a-forgotten-jerusalem/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 21:39:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/critique-of-the-moises-ville-murders-a-forgotten-jerusalem/ Argentinian journalist Javier Sinay’s family memoir, “The Moisés Ville Murders: The Rise and Fall of South America’s Jerusalem,” is as fascinating as it is eccentric – a journey that begins in the impoverished Jewish communities of late 19th and early 20th century Eastern Europe and winds through the newly built towns of the Argentine pampas, […]]]>

Argentinian journalist Javier Sinay’s family memoir, “The Moisés Ville Murders: The Rise and Fall of South America’s Jerusalem,” is as fascinating as it is eccentric – a journey that begins in the impoverished Jewish communities of late 19th and early 20th century Eastern Europe and winds through the newly built towns of the Argentine pampas, where for a time Yiddish was the common language.

Imagining the singsong sound of Yiddish echoing through the Argentine plains and countryside might seem like a dream. But Mr. Sinay reminds us that it was a real chapter in Jewish history. The Yiddish-speaking members of the diaspora who fled the pogroms and persecutions of the Old World for South America differed little from those who landed in North America.

What we also tend to forget, or never know, is the special lure that drew many Jews to the port of Buenos Aires: the opportunity to own and operate a farm, courtesy of Jewish philanthropist Maurice by Hirsch. In 1891, shocked by news of the starvation and death of would-be Jewish farmers lured to the pampas by fraudulent land schemes, Hirsch established the Jewish Colonization Association, designed to fund agricultural colonies for distressed Jews emigrating from ‘Europe. Hirsch purchased large tracts of land throughout the country for new immigrants to build their own villages, where they could earn a living working the land while maintaining their cultural and religious traditions through Jewish schools and synagogues. These agricultural towns grew so rapidly that in 1896 Theodor Herzl, the founder of Zionism, wondered for a moment whether the Jewish state should be located in Palestine or Argentina.

Moisés Ville, located about 400 miles northwest of Buenos Aires, was one of Hirsch’s first settlements, eventually growing so large that it was dubbed the Jerusalem of South America. It is also the place, between 1889 and 1906, of the murders to which Mr. Sinay refers in his title. Perhaps most important for the author, this is where his own ancestors first settled in 1894, when they emigrated from Belarus, before moving a few years later to the neighborhoods of Buenos Aires. populated by Jewish immigrants.

The Moisés Ville Murders: The Rise and Fall of South America’s Jerusalem

By Javier Sinay

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Mr Sinay was not particularly aware of or interested in any of this until 2009, when his father sent him an email with the subject: “Your great-grandfather”. Mr. Sinay knew almost nothing about this ancestor, Mijl Hacohen Sinay, apart from the fact that Mijl, too, had been a journalist. The email included a link to an article from 1947, written by Mijl, titled “The first fatal victims in Moisés Ville”. Mr. Sinay’s curiosity was piqued. The crimes the coin commemorated, some 40 years after the fact, had been vicious, ruthless and brutal. Twenty-two Jews had lost their lives, sometimes entire families at once, at the hands of murderous bandits, few of whom were identified, arrested or convicted.

But Mr. Sinay, himself an investigative journalist, sensed some shortcomings in Mijl’s reporting. The precise details of how, when and why these killings took place – anti-Semitism? xenophobia? crimes of opportunity? – were far from clear. Most puzzling of all, for Mr. Sinay, was Milj’s own motive in writing so passionately about them.

Even as he tried to put those questions aside, all the details, both familial and journalistic, hung in Mr. Sinay’s mind. Unable to give up the murders and determined to find out more about his great-grandfather, he begins his journey down memory lane.

Mr. Sinay’s frequent jumps between eras can be confusing, and I wish the translator, Robert Croll, had included brief definitions of the many Spanish and Argentinian phrases that dot the book. But the author interests us as he perseveres. In one of the funniest episodes, he consults a “book detective”, whom he hopes will discover a copy of the first Yiddish newspaper published in South America – Der Viderkol (The Echo) – whose founder and editor was none other than a 21-year-old Milj.

Mr. Sinay eventually learns that many of the documents he seeks were lost or destroyed in the devastating 1994 terrorist attack on the Argentine Israelite Mutual Association, where the Jewish Research Institute and other organizations were located. Jews, in an explosion that killed 85 people and injured hundreds. Inexplicably, Mr. Sinay does not situate this horror within the larger history of anti-Semitism in Argentina, including the country’s role in harboring former Nazis, the most infamous being Adolf Eichmann.

Inevitably, Mr. Sinay landed in Moisés Ville. At its height in the 1940s, the city was home to around 5,000 Jews, which made up more than 90% of its population. Today the city total The population is less than 2,500, of which about 10% are Jewish, most of them elderly. Mr. Sinay describes a quaint but sleepy scene, with the main street still called Calle Barón Hirsch. In the fully restored synagogue, he finds himself drawn to attend for the first time in his life a Friday evening service welcoming the Sabbath. Very few others are present. What happened to the once thriving Jewish town that existed here, Mr. Sinay wonders. The answer sounds like classic Jewish humor: “We sowed wheat and reaped doctors.

And some journalists too, perhaps added Mr. Sinay. For Mr. Sinay, the path that began with his father’s email eventually led him to embark on the study of Yiddish. His investigation may not have solved the murders, but the journey has taught him to value an ancestry and legacy he had not previously felt was so deeply embedded in his identity. In the end, it was the answers that mattered most.

Ms. Cole is the author of the memoir “After Great Pain: A New Life Emerges”.

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Top Senate Republican says Wendy Rogers could be censured for speaking to white nationalists http://www.jewsformorality.org/top-senate-republican-says-wendy-rogers-could-be-censured-for-speaking-to-white-nationalists/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 02:01:18 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/top-senate-republican-says-wendy-rogers-could-be-censured-for-speaking-to-white-nationalists/ Republican State Senator Wendy Rogers speaking January 15, 2022 at a rally for former President Donald Trump in Florence. Photo of Gage Skidmore (modified) | Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0 Discussions are underway in the Arizona Senate about the possibility of censoring Senator Wendy Rogers for her recent inflammatory comments and speech at a white nationalist conference […]]]>

Republican State Senator Wendy Rogers speaking January 15, 2022 at a rally for former President Donald Trump in Florence. Photo of Gage Skidmore (modified) | Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0

Discussions are underway in the Arizona Senate about the possibility of censoring Senator Wendy Rogers for her recent inflammatory comments and speech at a white nationalist conference this weekend, according to the second house Republican.

“We talk about this. We discuss it. I think it’s best to consolidate what we’re going to do before we start talking to the media about what we’re going to do,” Senate Majority Leader Senator Rick Gray told reporters on Monday.

Rogers blasted the idea Monday night, write on social media that she “will not apologize for being white. Hit me as much as you want.

She continued“I will personally destroy the career of any Republican who participates in gaslighting simply because of the color of my skin or my opinion of a war I don’t want to send our children to die in.”

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The America First Political Action Conference, as the event is known, is an annual white nationalist rally. In a speech at the conference On Friday in Orlando, Rogers, a Republican from Flagstaff, called for the construction of a gallows to hang “high profile criminals” and “traitors who have betrayed our country.”

Wendy Rogers said white nationalists are ‘patriots’ and called for political enemies to be hanged

Rogers also praised event organizer Nick Fuentes, a known Holocaust denier who has made racist and anti-Semitic remarks. In a speech at the conference, Fuentes said people compare Russian President Vladimir Putin to Adolf Hitler, “like that’s not a good thing.” Fuentes is a leader of the “groyper” movement which seeks to push the Republican Party further toward white nationalism. Rogers on Friday called him “America’s most persecuted man.”

Gray, a Sun City Republican, said he had “serious concerns” about clips he saw of Rogers’ comments to AFPAC, as the event is known. His commentary on building gallows was “disappointing”, he said.

“I can say that I do not reflect his point of view. It’s not where I stand,” Gray said.

Rogers also raised eyebrows over the weekend with inflammatory social media posts about the Russian invasion of Ukraine, some of which included entrenched anti-Semitic tropes. She said Ukrainian President Volodimyr Zelensky, who has become the global face of resistance to Putin’s invasion, “is a globalist puppet” for George Soros and the Clintons. She added that he, French President Emmanuel Macron, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau “all report to the same satanic masters”.

“I stand with Christians everywhere, not with the world bankers who are shoving ungodliness and degeneracy in our faces,” Rogers wrote on Twitter.

“Globalist” is a common code word used by anti-Semites to denigrate Jews. Soros and Zelensky are Jews.

They are disgusting. They have no place in politics, in civil society. They are ridiculous.

– Senator Paul Boyer, R-Glendale

Senate Speaker Karen Fann was more restrained in her response. She noted that she and other Senate Republican leaders issued a statement strongly supporting Ukraine in its war against Russia, but would not comment on Rogers’ other statements or his participation in AFPAC.

“We have a First Amendment right and anyone is allowed to say what they want. That doesn’t mean that we, as an organ of the Senate, agree with that,” said Fann, a Republican from Prescott.

Fann noted that some members of the Senate “are having conversations about the rest of the statements that have been made.” She wouldn’t comment on Gray’s claim that possible censorship might be in the works, saying only, “We’re not even there yet.” She said the Senate would issue additional statements and take action “as needed.”

She added that some senators were still unaware or unaware of Rogers’ recent statements.

“There are a lot of people who don’t follow Twitter and don’t follow the other stuff. I can tell you that I have members who are not even aware of the things that were said over the weekend. That’s why I said we needed some time for people to catch up on everything that’s happened so they can make their decisions on how best to handle it,” said Fann.

Some Republican senators, such as Sonny Borrelli and David Livingston, said they were unaware of Rogers’ statements and declined to comment. Republican Senators Sine Kerr and Tyler Pace also declined to comment.

Others have been forceful in their denunciation of Rogers. Senator Paul Boyer, a Republican from Glendale who has found himself at odds with much of his party over his refusal to embrace false conspiracy theories about the 2020 election, of which Rogers is a strong supporter, or the so-called “audit” that Fann commissioned of the election in Maricopa County, was the loudest voice among Senate Republicans.

“They are disgusting. They have no place in politics, in civil society. They are ridiculous,” Boyer said.

Boyer said Rogers’ comments were “specifically” anti-Semitic. When asked if he thought Rogers was a white nationalist, Boyer said she associated with white nationalists, spoke their language and appealed to them. He wondered if a censure would have an effect, but said other Republicans should speak out against her and expressed hope that voters would remove her from office this year. He also took issue with her invoking Christ and the gospels in her speech.

Boyer also said he disagreed with Governor Doug Ducey’s claim that Rogers is still better than the Democrat she defeated to win office in 2020. Ducey’s political action committee spent about $500,000 to help him defeat Democrat Felicia French. Boyer said he would prefer a Democrat, even if it would rob Senate Republicans of their 16th deciding vote.

Ducey: GOP senator with white nationalist ties is ‘even better than a’ Democrat

“I think we would still have to make some compelling arguments about the merits of any given policy,” Boyer said. “That kind of…rhetoric is beyond pale.”

Senator TJ Shope, R-Coolidge, has also been highly critical of Rogers’ rhetoric and his participation in AFPAC. In one Tweeter On Monday, Shope called Rogers’ comments about Ukraine “bullshit.”

“It’s completely, completely weird. I don’t even know where it comes from. Talk about something that just doesn’t seem rational at all, as far as thinking goes. Nothing positive to say, that’s for sure,” he told reporters on Monday.

Shope wouldn’t go so far as to say he’d rather have a Democrat than Rogers, but said: ‘I’d rather have someone in that seat without having to explain to me on a daily basis. ”

Shope would not comment on how he would vote on a hypothetical no-confidence motion against Rogers. He noted that he was the chairman of the House Ethics Committee and had “tremendous respect” for the process. He said he would have to consider all the information presented to him and that he didn’t want to “get out of his way”.

Rogers, who boasted in her AFPAC speech that she was not running away from criticismwould not speak to reporters on the Senate floor on Monday.

I would prefer someone to occupy this seat without having to explain myself to me on a daily basis.

– Senator TJ Shope, R-Coolidge

Arizona Republicans were largely silent on Rogers Monday. But GOP members of the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors, who are ridiculed by Rogers’ wing of the party for false election conspiracy theories and debunked “audit” claims, have been highly critical.

Bill Gates, the chairman of the board, and Clint Hickman, its vice chairman, released a joint statement on Monday slamming Rogers for defending Putin, saying “anyone who doesn’t support his conspiracy theories is a puppet of Soros, a traitor or a communist”. ” – Rogers directed similar criticism at the Arizona Mirror — and for adopting “anti-Semitic, racist and homophobic rhetoric.”

“The United States of America has always been a beacon of hope for those who believe in self-determination and self-government. At this critical time, we need the world to see that we are not just preaching American values ​​to others, but living them ourselves,” Gates and Hickman said. “Wendy Rogers does not represent American values ​​or interests. I hope other business, community and political leaders will publicly condemn his hateful, dangerous, paranoid and un-American rhetoric.

Republican Supervisor Tom Galvin tweeted that Rogers is “spreading anti-Semitic tropes to defend Putin” and wrote“AFPAC morons are not conservatives and I’m all for canceling white supremacists, Nazi sympathizers and Putin suckers.”

The Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry also condemned Rogers for his statements.

“We hope it goes without saying that the House vehemently condemns the anti-Semitic views held by AFPAC and its supporters. Elected officials who spread this kind of hateful and divisive rhetoric will have to answer to voters,” House spokeswoman Annie Vogt said in a statement provided to the shimmer.

The Arizona Chamber of Commerce helped fund Ducey’s campaign to boost Rogers in 2020. The chamber and a PAC it controls donated $140,000 to the governor’s PAC, which spent nearly $3.4 million dollars to elect Republican legislators.

Nationally, several prominent Republicans have targeted two GOP members of Congress who spoke at AFPAC, Paul Gosar of Arizona and Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia.

Asked about Gosar and Greene, US Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said, “There is no place in the Republican Party for white supremacists or anti-Semitism.” His House counterpart, Californian Kevin McCarthy, said it was “appalling and wrong” for Gosar and Greene to appear at AFPAC, and said he would talk to them.

US Senator Mitt Romney, R-Utah, called them “cretins.” And Wyoming GOP Congresswoman Liz Cheney criticized members of his own party for not speaking against them, saying “the silence of Republican Party leaders is deafening and empowering.” Adam Kinzinger, Republican of Illinois said Gosar and Greene should be kicked out of the GOP.

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Idaho Faith: Jews Need Help to Fight Anti-Semitism http://www.jewsformorality.org/idaho-faith-jews-need-help-to-fight-anti-semitism/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 12:00:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/idaho-faith-jews-need-help-to-fight-anti-semitism/ Rabbi Dan Fink During last month’s hostage crisis in a Texas SynagogueJews across America thought nervously, “There, but for the grace of God, I go.” When the rabbi and congregants bravely escaped, we breathed a collective sigh of relief. But our anxiety persists. Sadly, for Jews today, just going to services is an act of […]]]>

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Rabbi Dan Fink

During last month’s hostage crisis in a Texas SynagogueJews across America thought nervously, “There, but for the grace of God, I go.”

When the rabbi and congregants bravely escaped, we breathed a collective sigh of relief. But our anxiety persists.

Sadly, for Jews today, just going to services is an act of courage. We know that the epidemic of violent anti-Jewish hatred will break out again. It could happen anywhere, including here in Idaho. To proactively fight anti-Semitism, we need to consider what it is, where it comes from, and what we can do to combat it. Here are my brief thoughts on these questions.

I believe the clearest definition of anti-Semitism is prejudice, hatred, or violence against Jews as Jews. Like other forms of oppression, anti-Semitism is based on ugly stereotypes and misinformation. The Jewish scapegoat often invokes conspiracy theories that falsely accuse us of greed, malevolence and disloyalty. These tropes date back centuries, promulgated by medieval Christian and modern secular regimes. Unlike most expressions of bigotry, anti-Semitism uses a myth of Jewish power to blame us for all sorts of misfortunes in the world.

This helps explain why anti-Semitism has always come from both sides of the political spectrum. Historically, fascist anti-Semites have castigated Jews as dangerous communist radicals, while Marxist revolutionaries have ridiculed us as capitalist oligarchs. Today, too, anti-Semitism thrives on both the far right and the far left, as well as among radical Islamists such as the alleged Colleyville shooter.

Texas Syn.jpg
The Congregation Beth Israel Synagogue in Colleyville, Texas. Brandon Bell Getty Images

On the right, anti-Semitism is inextricably linked to white supremacy; as an example, consider the Klansmen, neo-Nazis and militias who Parade in Charlottesville chanting: “The Jews will not replace us! I believe that here in Idaho, this form of anti-Semitism poses the greatest threat.

Idaho is home to many rogue groups whose extreme anti-government views often veer into classic anti-Jewish conspiracies — and too many politicians in our states court these groups as their political base. The fact that most of these people are armed to the teeth reinforces our distrust of them.

On the left, anti-Semitism usually comes in the guise of anti-capitalism and anti-Zionism. To clarify: The problem is not opposing capitalism, but exploiting anti-Semitic stereotypes around Jews and money. Likewise, there is no inherent problem with criticizing Israel and its government. Israelis and American Jews frequently do this, just as we criticize our own government when we disapprove of its actions.

Anti-Zionist rhetoric crosses the line into anti-Semitism when, in the words of Natan Sharansky, “it delegitimizes or denies the Jewish people‘s right to self-determination; demonizes Jews by portraying them as evil or blowing Israel’s actions out of proportion; or holds Israel to a double standard.

This type of anti-Zionism also draws on historical anti-Jewish stereotypes. Examples of anti-capitalist and anti-Zionist anti-Semitism would include both Rep. Ilhan Omar’s suggestion that American Jewish support for Israel is “all about the Benjamins” and instances where some college campuses and progressive groups effectively silence even prospects liberal Zionists.

Finally, anti-Semitism plays a crucial role in radical Islamist ideology. I hasten to note that in most American communities – including Colleyville and here in Boise – Jews and Muslims have strong and friendly ties and work closely together. Islamist extremists, on the other hand, use the same anti-Semitic tropes we have seen before, demonizing Jews as powerful perpetrators of evil conspiracies.

Many blame Jews for 9/11, and it’s no coincidence that the Texas shooter targeted a synagogue because he absurdly believed Jews had the power to free a federal prisoner with just one phone call notorious convicted of murdering American soldiers.

This brings me to the crucial question: how do we combat anti-Semitism? For one thing, acknowledge it and speak out against it, especially when it comes from your side of the political spectrum.

Liberals and Muslims are opportunely quick to condemn anti-Jewish heinous acts by those on the far right, as in Pittsburgh and Poway, California, but may be reluctant to address the anti-Semitism of some progressives and Islamists. Meanwhile, conservatives who are vigilant against radical leftist and Islamist anti-Semitism too often turn a blind eye when the perpetrators come from the furthest fringes of their own party. Our challenge is to unequivocally recognize and condemn anti-Jewish bigotry within our own chosen communities.

To turn back the rising tide of anti-Semitism, we ask for your partnership, to unite with courage and integrity to make our community safe for the Jewish community and for all of us.

Dan Fink is the rabbi of Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel.

The Idaho Statesman’s weekly faith column features a rotation of writers from different faiths and perspectives.

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A ‘Palestine First’ Scandal Hits the US Congress http://www.jewsformorality.org/a-palestine-first-scandal-hits-the-us-congress/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 02:04:56 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/a-palestine-first-scandal-hits-the-us-congress/ (February 4, 2022 / JNS) During Barack Obama’s presidency, when diplomatic tensions between Israel and the United States reached levels rarely seen, the term “Israel-Prime” was concocted by opponents of the Jewish state as a way to humiliate its advocates and supporters in America. Being an “Israel-Firster” meant that you put Israel’s interests above those […]]]>

During Barack Obama’s presidency, when diplomatic tensions between Israel and the United States reached levels rarely seen, the term “Israel-Prime” was concocted by opponents of the Jewish state as a way to humiliate its advocates and supporters in America.

Being an “Israel-Firster” meant that you put Israel’s interests above those of the United States and were therefore branded as someone with suspect loyalties. For the many Jews thus defamed, there were unmistakable echoes of past surges in anti-Semitism, with the fixation on obscure Jewish imperatives taking precedence over national security concerns. But it was also problematic in other ways.

On the one hand, the term implied that the United States had one set of interests and Israel a completely different set, turning two close allies into adversaries. It also suggested that Israel was a rogue state that was happy enough to use Diaspora Jewish communities as a fifth column when necessary. Through a combination of financial incentives, subtle intimidation and promises of political advancement, the “Israel-Firsters” were able to ensure that American politicians put Israel’s agenda before that of their own country, thus ensuring distrust and dislike of the United States throughout the Muslim world. world at the same time as billions of American taxpayer dollars poured in to support the Israeli occupation of the Palestinians.

This caricature of advocacy for Israel in America has been offset by the carefully nurtured self-image of Palestinian advocates as speaking truth to power and campaigning for their cause through the power of popular persuasion, rather than dubious congressional lobbying. . If Israel is an establishment cause, by logic, then Palestine must be the primary mission of a progressive coalition that understands Zionism as a political toxin, alongside racism and Islamophobia. And while the defense of Israel unfolds in the halls of power, Palestine manifests itself in street protests and campus rallies, in mass petitions and, above all, in the campaign to subject Israel to a regime of boycotts, divestments and sanctions as seen in the BDS movement.

But that self-image has taken a hit in the past fortnight with a new political scandal involving Rep. Marie Newman, a left-leaning Democrat from Illinois who is a staunch opponent of Israel. Newman is currently under investigation by the House Ethics Committee after a report released in late January by the Office of Congressional Ethics (OCE) concluded that there were “substantial grounds for believe” that she had violated federal law by promising a job to a political rival as part of a quid pro quo.

Newman’s rival – a Palestinian-American scholar named Iymen Chehade – has reportedly been promised a job as a foreign policy adviser with a six-figure salary in exchange for not running against her in the Congressional race in 2020. A 2018 email uncovered by the OCE included an agreement that Chehade “would not advertise or submit his candidacy for election as Congressional Representative for Illinois’ 3rd District” and that ‘”In exchange, Newman will hire Chehade as a senior foreign policy adviser.” But after winning the election, Newman reportedly reneged on their agreement. Chehade filed a lawsuit in response before the couple reached a settlement at the undisclosed amicable.

Further inquiries, however, revealed a surprising additional layer to Newman’s discussions with Chehade regarding his positions on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. According to the daily beast last week, “a comfortable job and a headline weren’t the only things Newman bargained for.”

Chehade is said to have obtained Newman’s agreement to fully control his positions on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Arguably, that wasn’t such a big ask, given that Newman had sponsored several bills in favor of a Palestinian state and, last September, was one of eight Democratic lawmakers to vote against a bill. bill authorizing $1 billion for the anti-Israel Iron Dome. missile system. Moreover, a visit to her home website reveals a single topic under the “Issues” tab: “Israel-Palestine”.

Nevertheless, according to communications uncovered by the daily beast, Chehade was clearly leaving nothing to chance, demanding Newman’s agreement on a range of policy issues. This would amount to opposing any legislation involving military aid to Israel, supporting legislation on a Palestinian state, and traveling to the region on “fact-finding” missions whose itinerary would be entirely determined by Chehade.

Chehade also demanded that Newman boycott Israeli and Jewish organizations, thus proving himself to be an eliminationist anti-Zionist who opposes the very existence of Israel. “At no time will Newman accept partial or full funding for Congressional delegations from the [Jewish National Fund], any organization affiliated with the Israeli government, or any organization that embraces the Israeli Zionist or colonial project,” he wrote.

At no time did Newman sound troubled by the use of federal funds to reach a private agreement with a Palestinian lawyer who would have provided him with a well-paid job and political influence – the source of concern for the Ethics committee. Instead, she replied to Chehade’s email saying, “Most look good. Some concerns, mainly phraseology. »

Newman dismissed the investigation into his professional relationship with Chehade as a “partisan witch hunt”. She is also set to lose her congressional seat after a redistricting in Illinois, meaning she will face a lawmaker from her own party, Rep. Sean Casten, later this year. So it shouldn’t come as a shock if the progressive “Squad” of House Democrats loses at least one member in 2022.

Even if Newman disappears from Capitol Hill, the lessons of his dodgy arrangement with Chehade must be absorbed. It is painfully obvious that no American interest is served by the adoption of anti-Israel positions by an elected official at the request of a deciding outside adviser. Newman and Chehade can rightly be called “Palestine-Firsters”, since for both of them, the Palestinian cause takes precedence over all other considerations. Other legislators in the House should not make the same mistake.

Ben Cohen is a New York-based journalist and author who writes a weekly column on Jewish and international affairs for JNS.

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Houthi health minister claims Jews control global economy in TV rant on ‘Jew-hatred’ http://www.jewsformorality.org/houthi-health-minister-claims-jews-control-global-economy-in-tv-rant-on-jew-hatred/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 13:07:05 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/houthi-health-minister-claims-jews-control-global-economy-in-tv-rant-on-jew-hatred/ The health minister for areas of Yemen controlled by the Houthi rebels, the Iranian proxy whose organization is known as Ansar Allah, launched into a diatribe against the Jewish people in which, among other statements, he accused the Jews of controlling the world economy. Taha Al-Motawakel’s rant was launched on January 21 in Sanaa, Yemen’s […]]]>

The health minister for areas of Yemen controlled by the Houthi rebels, the Iranian proxy whose organization is known as Ansar Allah, launched into a diatribe against the Jewish people in which, among other statements, he accused the Jews of controlling the world economy.

Taha Al-Motawakel’s rant was launched on January 21 in Sanaa, Yemen’s largest city, and was broadcast on Al-Eman TV.

During the four-minute clip uploaded to YouTube, Mr. Al-Motawakel can be seen saying that Jews “control the world economy” and invested their money in the UAE because they were too “cowardly and miser” to invest in Tel Aviv, due to the supposed fact that Jews know that Tel Aviv is “in the midst of a conflict with Arabs and Muslims”.

He then went on to say that “Jewish billionaires” had started “conspiring against the Islamic nation from Abu Dhabi and Dubai,” before calling the two cities “Jewish settlements” that are “run, controlled and supervised by Jews. “. ”

He went on to say, “As you know, Jews are always working in the shadows.”

“It is America and Israel that are killing us today,” he added. “The horrific massacres committed today are not conceived by human minds. They are the result of Jewish hatred.

According to the international definition of anti-Semitism, “Making false, dehumanizing, demonizing, or stereotypical claims about Jews as such or about the power of Jews as a collective – such as, in particular but not exclusively, the myth of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of anti-Semitism.

The video ends with a categorical statement by Mr. Al-Motawakel: “We are in a real confrontation with the Jews.”

Also in January, a Houthi scholar said the Saud clan’s “Jewish regime” must be “uprooted”.

In April, attitudes explicitly hostile to the Jewish people and to Israel, including the repeated use of the slogan “curse on the Jews”, were discovered in educational materials in Yemen.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism around the world. Please contact us if you would like to share your feedback or volunteer to help with this project.

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Antisemitism, charges of improper spending led top public defender to resign; he denies them | News http://www.jewsformorality.org/antisemitism-charges-of-improper-spending-led-top-public-defender-to-resign-he-denies-them-news/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 21:00:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/antisemitism-charges-of-improper-spending-led-top-public-defender-to-resign-he-denies-them-news/ When the chief public defender of Ascension, Assumption and St. James parishes resigned in November after 12 years, he did so amid an investigation into allegations he had done anti-Semitic comments, allegedly hired his son inappropriately, and asked staff to do personal legal work for him. , show investigation documents. The Louisiana Public Defender Board […]]]>

When the chief public defender of Ascension, Assumption and St. James parishes resigned in November after 12 years, he did so amid an investigation into allegations he had done anti-Semitic comments, allegedly hired his son inappropriately, and asked staff to do personal legal work for him. , show investigation documents.

The Louisiana Public Defender Board launched the investigation into Alan Robert on Sept. 30 after an email from one of Robert’s employees raised some of the allegations, documents show.

Council investigators substantiated some of the charges of financial impropriety and some of the allegations of anti-Semitism against Robert, according to an investigation summary. Their findings weren’t as strong on broader charges. Robert created a hostile work environment.

The state’s public defender’s board took no action because of the investigation, according to board papers, a board attorney and Robert. Council members declined to comment.

Robert resigned on November 30, but denied the charges against him.

“My resignation is the direct result of a false and malicious complaint that was filed against me,” he wrote in a Nov. 11 email announcing his resignation to his staff and contract attorneys.

Robert says he was the victim of an unfair investigation by staff of the State Public Defense Board, calling it a “witch hunt” and “Spanish Inquisition”.

Robert said the complaint was sparked by a disgruntled, non-lawyer employee who violated office policies and overpaid a contract attorney. He claims the employee filed suit against him after he raised the overpayment and notified the state’s public defender.

Antisemitism allegations

The alleged anti-Semitic comments were directed at Susan Kutcher Jones, chief deputy defender of the 23rd Judicial District Court and Robert’s longtime former litigation supervisor, with whom he had worked closely for years, according to an investigative summary from the staff.

Jones, who declined to comment on the survey, is ethnically Jewish and practical in the denomination of Reform Judaism.

Council investigators concluded that “several staff members confirmed hearing Mr. Robert make remarks to Ms. Kutcher-Jones that they considered anti-Semitic.”

The investigative summary does not specifically describe the type of anti-Semitic comments that were substantiated. But other documents indicate that Robert made jokes about Jewish religious holidays in front of Jones.

Jones initially denied allegations of anti-Semitism about Robert to an investigator, but later admitted to another investigator that Robert had made anti-Semitic remarks about him, according to investigation records.

“She said he often made jokes and made statements about his religion that as a Jewish woman she just ‘knows’ the intent of the comments,” the investigation documents state.

Board records show that she was not the initial whistleblower, but did not speak to investigators until after she launched the investigation. She spoke about her concerns about Robert and the fear some contracted defense attorneys had about talking to investigators, records show.

Robert vehemently denied the allegations of anti-Semitism.

“There are absolutely no factual allegations of anti-Semitism. In other words, it was just a general statement not supported by allegations of a specific nature,” he said in an interview. “It’s impossible to answer anything other than to say it’s bull—-.”

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Investigators said they found allegations that Robert denied the Holocaust. Robert denied this, telling investigators he had visited a Nazi concentration camp and brought back for Jones a book about the camp and a gold Star of David with gems. Distant relatives of Jones’ family suffered in the Nazi camps.

Investigators also uncovered allegations that judges and other 23rd JDC court personnel treated Jones in an anti-Semitic manner, particularly during religious holidays and court scheduling. But they drew no conclusions on these claims.

Alvin Turner Jr., chief judge of the 23rd Judicial District Court, said Thursday that he had spoken with other judges in the district and none, including himself, had been interviewed by council investigators.

He did not comment on the anti-Semitism allegations.

Alleged financial problems

Robert is accused of hiring his son to do legal work for the Public Defender’s Office and paying him $1,845 in 2018 – council investigators called it a “clear breach of ethics”. He is also accused of having a clerk do his personal legal work on public time.

The board also uncovered allegations that he paid his contract attorneys illegal $250 bonuses, paid them before they submitted their timesheets, and left the day-to-day running of the office to Jones and another staff member.

In a written response to the state board and in interviews last week, Robert accused the financial claims of being a rehash or misrepresentation of old issues that had already been resolved or were unproblematic. He said his office had quality financial audits and a $1 million surplus when he left Nov. 30.

Robert said his son returned the money after an earlier audit by the Public Defender Board. He also said the payment never resulted in ethical sanctions.

Robert told investigators that attorney payments were part of the regular compensation schedule, although investigators claimed the structure may still be illegal and noted that contract attorneys described their $250 payments as bonuses.

Robert told investigators Jones’ role was to have day-to-day contact with attorneys and that he managed his office and another public defender’s office with a vacant chief at the time of the investigation.

Hostile demands in the workplace

Among the allegations raised in the initial whistleblower email and subsequent interviews with staff members, Robert was accused of treating female employees with medical and family health issues differently than male employees, primarily by cutting wages.

“The 23rd Judicial District Public Defender’s Office has become a hostile environment in which to work,” the whistleblower’s email claims. “We are mistreated by Mr. Robert because we are women.”

The whistleblower also said Robert falsely told Jones she could face a hefty fine that could come after Robert hired and paid his son.

The staff investigation summary says investigators found the allegations of workplace hostility unclear, although they determined that two female contract attorneys were treated differently than their male counterparts in similar situations.

Robert said the difference in treatment came at the request of the lawyers.

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Opinion: Non-Jewish ASU students must do more to fight anti-Semitism http://www.jewsformorality.org/opinion-non-jewish-asu-students-must-do-more-to-fight-anti-semitism/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 18:06:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/opinion-non-jewish-asu-students-must-do-more-to-fight-anti-semitism/ At January 15a 44-year-old Briton held four people hostage in a Texas synagogue, including the rabbi. Later in the weekan FBI director called the attack an act of anti-Semitism. Anti-Semitism isn’t just something we see in the national news – it happens in our own community here at ASU. In August 2020, antisemitic posters were […]]]>

At January 15a 44-year-old Briton held four people hostage in a Texas synagogue, including the rabbi. Later in the weekan FBI director called the attack an act of anti-Semitism.

Anti-Semitism isn’t just something we see in the national news – it happens in our own community here at ASU. In August 2020, antisemitic posters were found on ASU’s Tempe campus. In November 2021, several more flyers were found posted.

Antisemitism exists here at ASU, and it is our responsibility as a student community to fight against all forms of discrimination so that students of all cultures feel welcome.

Madeleine Steppel, a Jewish student and student of religious studies, fell victim to anti-Semitism when she discovered one of the flyers at the Hassayampa University Village in November. Steppel said that throughout the day his body was shaking due to the intergenerational trauma of anti-Semitism.

READ MORE: ASU PD to investigate anti-Semitic flyers posted on Tempe campus

“You see these things happening on campus, but you never expect them to happen to you,” Steppel said.

According to the Anti-Defamation League, a national organization fighting anti-Semitism, a third of Jewish students experienced antisemitism on college campuses in 2021. Only 51% of students experiencing antisemitism on college campuses said they felt safe on campus.

Although anti-Semitism is an ongoing problem, that doesn’t mean there can’t be a solution. Many students stressed the importance of educating non-Jews about Jewish culture to help combat anti-Semitism.

Steppel said it was important for young people to be educated as well. “Just like when kids are taught that racism is bad, at 4 or 5 years old, we also have to teach them that anti-Semitism is bad,” Steppel said.

Only 22 public school systems Holocaust education mandate. Although Arizona is one of 22 states, Holocaust education was not mandatory statewide until July 2021.

While many ASU students may never have had a Holocaust education or been educated about Jewish culture at all, ASU Hillel Executive Director Debbie Yunker Kail said that it doesn’t mean they can’t learn anything now.

“When you see a Jewish student (or) if you have a Jewish friend, ask them about their culture, tradition and heritage,” Yunker Kail said. “Just the same way you would show interest in anyone.”

According to Yunker Kail, some Jewish students themselves don’t know much about their own culture.

“They can know they’re Jewish, they can see something like what happened in Texas and feel personally affected,” Yunker Kail said. “But they may not even know how to explain it or how to express what their Jewish identity means to them.”

Yunker Kail said the best way to raise awareness is to give people the language to talk about their identity and culture so they can take care of it themselves.

But ending anti-Semitism should not be the responsibility of the Jewish people. Non-Jews must also step in and help.

“Call it,” Steppel said. “Say what it is and explain why it’s also anti-Semitic.”

According to Rabbi Shmuel Tiechtel, of Chabad ASU, acts of violence do not happen by chance.

“Acts of violence don’t start with acts of violence,” Tiechtel said. “Usually they start with words of hate. When the words of hate are stopped – but others say there’s no room for it – I believe that will stop acts of violence.”

As a community here at ASU, we must speak out against anti-Semitism when we see it or hear it, whether we are Jewish or not. If we can educate ourselves by learning more about different cultures and being kind to our Jewish friends on campus, ASU will be a more welcoming place for everyone.


Contact the reporter at wjbrown@asu.edu and follow @JakeBrownASU on Twitter.

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Editor’s note: The opinions presented in this column are those of the author and do not imply any endorsement by The State Press or its editors.

Want to join the conversation? Email opiniondesk.statepress@gmail.com. Keep letters under 500 words and be sure to include your university affiliation. Anonymity will not be granted.


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“When we fight anti-Semitism, we can fight all forms of hatred in the world” http://www.jewsformorality.org/when-we-fight-anti-semitism-we-can-fight-all-forms-of-hatred-in-the-world/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 10:30:20 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/when-we-fight-anti-semitism-we-can-fight-all-forms-of-hatred-in-the-world/ “When we fight anti-Semitism, we can fight all forms of hatred in the world,” said Joël Mergui, president of the Jewish Consistory of Paris and the European Center for Judaism, during an intervention last week at the of a symposium in Kiev. , Ukraine, on the eve of International Holocaust Remembrance Day. His remarks come […]]]>

“When we fight anti-Semitism, we can fight all forms of hatred in the world,” said Joël Mergui, president of the Jewish Consistory of Paris and the European Center for Judaism, during an intervention last week at the of a symposium in Kiev. , Ukraine, on the eve of International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

His remarks come as a new study reveals the extent of anti-Semitism in France, the country of the largest Jewish community in Europe.

“The number of anti-Semitic acts in 2021 has increased in France compared to 2020. Above all increasing violence. There is a rise of extremes in France, in Europe and in the rest of the world. This is very worrying because this anti-Semitism comes from both the far right and the far left – but also from Islamism,” Mergui said.

The survey conducted by Ifop reveals that 68% of French Jews have already been insulted because of their religion and that 20% of them have been victims of physical attacks. A phenomenon rooted in school.

In France, 55% of Jewish parents advise their children not to wear a distinctive sign for fear that they will be the target of physical or verbal aggression.

The survey by the Foundation for Political Innovation and the American Jewish Committee reveals the former weight of prejudice.

“Negative stereotypes towards Jews are still very present” in France, write the authors of the new “X-ray of anti-Semitism”.

“Puns, insults, verbal and physical attacks, the year 2021 was marked by the multiplication of anti-Semitic incidents”, indicates the survey. 74% of French Jews say they “have already experienced anti-Semitic behavior, ranging from mockery to physical aggression, including insults or verbal threats”.

Two-thirds of French respondents believe that anti-Semitism is widespread (64%) and on the increase. Most French people of Jewish faith or culture (73%) believe that anti-Semitism has become more and more prevalent over the past ten years. This survey also reveals that 30% of those questioned agree with the idea that “Jews are richer than the average Frenchman”.

Other clichés persist: “Jews have too much power in the field of economy and finance” resonates with 26% of respondents. 24% of respondents find that “Jews have too much power in the media”. These figures are stable compared to the survey conducted in 2016.

53% of respondents have already been insulted

The thoughts about the Jews remain ingrained and the jokes in bad taste are always present. Two-thirds of French respondents (68%) have already witnessed “derogatory mockery or vexatious remarks”. “These ‘derogatory mockeries’ cannot be equated with acts of violence, but their scale testifies to the permanence within French society of ancient anti-Semitic prejudices, prejudices which Jews are frequently confronted with,” the study indicates.

Jews are not only victims of jokes, anti-Semitic acts persist. 53% of people surveyed say they have received insults (48% in 2019), “threats of assault (24% in 2021, compared to 22% in 2019), theft and damage (22% in 2021 and 2019) and physical attacks (20% in 2021, 23% in 2019)” according to the survey.

Social networks have become one of the spaces where anti-Semitic discourse is released the most according to the survey: “28% of French Jews say they have already been threatened on social networks, a proportion that even reaches 46% for those under 25 years. old.” More and more young people say they are victims of anti-Semitism. In 2019, 53% of 18-24s said they had been insulted at least once, they are now 63%. Social networks are often cited, but the school has become “the first place of exposure to anti-Semitic violence”.

60% of victims say they have been attacked at school, 42% of them on several occasions. “Jewish families have understood this and often ask their children not to wear recognizable signs of their Jewishness, and even to avoid revealing the fact that they are Jewish. This is why these families are increasingly sending their children to denominational, Catholic or Jewish schools,” the survey said.

This study also shows that a certain category of the population is more receptive to anti-Semitic prejudice: men over 65 years old. “The spread of anti-Semitic bias is also more prevalent on the far left and far right,” the researchers noted.

The survey also indicates that almost half of French Jews (46%) have already considered leaving France, six points less than in the 2019 study. What changes are the reasons for leaving? 13% of respondents want to leave France out of fear for their future, compared to 21% in 2019. On the other hand, cultural or religious reasons have increased in three years, from 6% to 12%.

In their conclusions, the researchers note “that between a quarter and a third of our fellow citizens share these anti-Semitic prejudices. This new X-ray of anti-Semitism confirms the persistence of anti-Semitism at the heart of French society.”

Joël Mergui Mergui called for the appointment of a person responsible for the fight against anti-Semitism in each European country. “Unfortunately, countries often name a person responsible for any hate. ‘Each hate must be treated differently and anti-Semitism must be dealt with specifically,’ he said.

While these statistics are cause for pessimism, Mergui said “our responsibility today is that Judaism lives on.”

”There is also a reason to be optimistic because today there is the State of Israel. Half of the Jewish population lives in their land of origin and another half living in the world go back to synagogues, traditions, claim their identity. Let us continue to proudly wear the yarmulke and keep Judaism alive,” he added.

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Jewish women are leaders on abortion rights. But they need your help. -J. http://www.jewsformorality.org/jewish-women-are-leaders-on-abortion-rights-but-they-need-your-help-j/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 23:02:46 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/jewish-women-are-leaders-on-abortion-rights-but-they-need-your-help-j/ In 1966, I was a student at the Boston University School of Social Work when I received a phone call from a college friend. She explained to me in a low voice that she needed an abortion and thought I could help her. At that time, I didn’t know anyone who had terminated a pregnancy; […]]]>

In 1966, I was a student at the Boston University School of Social Work when I received a phone call from a college friend. She explained to me in a low voice that she needed an abortion and thought I could help her.

At that time, I didn’t know anyone who had terminated a pregnancy; all I knew was that abortion was illegal. I quietly asked classmates if they knew how to terminate a pregnancy safely. One of them had an answer.

It wasn’t long before I got the phone number of a doctor who performed abortions in a kitchen that functioned as an underground clinic. “He won’t call you back unless you say the right word,” my classmate told me. I nervously left the doctor a message with the code word, knowing my friend’s fate was at stake. When the doctor called me back, I made an appointment with my friend. For $500, she terminated her pregnancy, regained her independence, and moved on with her life. We never spoke of her abortion again.

My friend was lucky to have had a small community of resourceful people at a time when access to abortion was illegal and surrounded by fear, intimidation and shame. She was also lucky enough to be able to pay $500 – about $4,300 in today’s dollars – for a risky procedure and not suffer any health complications.

I fear that we are approaching a time when clandestine abortions in makeshift clinical kitchens will once again become commonplace in the United States. According to a report published by the Guttmacher Institute in 2018, more than 22,000 women and girls worldwide die every year after having an unsafe abortion. Now, all signs suggest the United States Supreme Court is set to overturn or significantly erode Roe v. Wade, his landmark decision that legalized abortion in 1973.

If so, at least 24 US states would consider it illegal to receive or perform abortions. Consider how many people will die or suffer long-term health problems from unsafe abortions if we revert to a pre-Roe world.

I am a Jewish philanthropist who has supported many women’s dignity initiatives in American Jewry, Israel, and around the world. I never thought I would live long enough to see the day when abortion would become illegal again. But here we are. I look around me and ask myself: why so few Jewish leaders speak out?

Most Jews — 83% according to the Pew Research Center – promote abortion rights, making the Jewish community one of the most progressive religious groups in the country that support reproductive justice. Given this percentage, I would expect Jewish groups to use their influence to protect abortion access at this urgent time in our history. And yet, the vast majority of American Jewish organizations have been chillingly silent.

For years, I have pushed for issues affecting women and LGBTQ+ people to become a central part of the Jewish community agenda. But time and time again, I’ve been disappointed when Jewish institutions that don’t explicitly serve women or LGBTQ+ people don’t prioritize — or ignore entirely — the needs, struggles, and life experiences of more than half of them. of the Jewish population. It is time for that to change.

The burden of mobilizing Jews around abortion access shouldn’t just fall on women and LGBTQ+ people

Jewish women have a lasting legacy in promoting reproductive justice. The Jewish Women’s Archives documents this story in their digital collection. “Jewish Women and the Feminist Revolution” as well as in a recent podcast episode on The Jane Collective – an underground abortion counseling service in Chicago founded by Jewish activist Heather Booth that operated from 1969 to 1973, when abortion was illegal.

Similarly, Lilith Magazine has dedicated several of its pages and blog posts to abortion access, spanning several decades. The 1981 issue of Lilith featured a cover story titled “The Jewish Stake in Abortion Rights” with an image of two bent coat hangers that formed the shape of a Star of David. Hangers were frequently used to terminate pregnancies before Roe, and they remain dangerous (though accessible) tools even today.

Since its founding in 1893, the National Council of Jewish Women has been a leader in the movement for reproductive health and rights. Recently, she launched the “Rabbis for Breeding» campaign and convened a Jewish Abortion Access Coalition with partners inside and outside the Jewish community. This week, NCJW is hosting Repro Shabbat, an opportunity for congregations, organizations, and communities to celebrate the critical importance of reproductive health and justice, and to learn more about Judaism’s approach to these issues.

I am grateful for all these efforts. But the burden of mobilizing Jews around abortion access shouldn’t just fall on women and LGBTQ+ people. Leaders of organized Jewry – dominated by men – have never shied away from expressing their outrage at crises that undermine our basic humanity, such as anti-Semitism and violence in Israel. Nor were they shy about expressing concern about assimilation, intermarriage, infertility, and Jewish continuity. But what about the crisis of losing the right to make decisions about our own bodies? Where is the community outcry over this?

To be clear, I admire the brave Jewish leaders who shared their abortion stories publicly in recent years. There are, no doubt, thousands of people in the Jewish community – rabbis and educators; donors and devotees; friends and neighbors – who have had abortions or who will need them in the future. Their reasons may vary, but one thing remains true: keeping abortion safe and legal reflects our most cherished Jewish values: pikuach nefesh (saving a life), briyut (health and safety), kavod (human dignity) and tzedek (justice). ).

I therefore call on all Jewish leaders and institutions – not just those run by and for women – to speak out boldly in defense of abortion access and safety. Our lives, our families and our future depend on it.

When my friend who needed an abortion called me for help almost 50 years ago, I know she was deeply afraid of what her future would be like if she were forced to become a mother before she died. ‘be ready. I never want another friend of mine – or anyone else – to experience the same fear, or face an even more disastrous outcome, or suffer the effects of an abortion done negligently or without proper medical care.

The Jewish community knows how to defend the dignity, justice and health of those we love, including those who are strangers to us. We have done it before and we must do it again. It is now.

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