Jewish religion – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 11:23:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.jewsformorality.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T151402.937-150x150.png Jewish religion – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ 32 32 Julia Haart tackles pushback of Orthodox Jews after Netflix show http://www.jewsformorality.org/julia-haart-tackles-pushback-of-orthodox-jews-after-netflix-show/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/julia-haart-tackles-pushback-of-orthodox-jews-after-netflix-show/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 09:02:18 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/julia-haart-tackles-pushback-of-orthodox-jews-after-netflix-show/ Julia Haart cherishes the positive reactions she has heard since the launch of her reality series, “My Unorthodox Life”, on Netflix. But the former Orthodox Jewish mother / yeshiva teacher and Monsey resident and fashion mogul is also keenly aware of the negative comments and admits she was surprised at the level of vitriol. “I […]]]>

Julia Haart cherishes the positive reactions she has heard since the launch of her reality series, “My Unorthodox Life”, on Netflix. But the former Orthodox Jewish mother / yeshiva teacher and Monsey resident and fashion mogul is also keenly aware of the negative comments and admits she was surprised at the level of vitriol.

“I wonder if those who write on these topics have watched the show,” Haart said in a phone interview the same week his reality show launched. “I think if people actually watched the show they would see it’s very positive.

“I’m actually surprised by the attitude,” Haart said in a July 14 telephone interview as she prepared for a work trip to Europe. “I really thought people would give him a chance. There is no anger in my heart.”

Julia Haart in "My unorthodox life," Season 1. Episode 5, Secular in the city.

The show is, in many ways, a typical reality TV dish: Haart leads a glamorous New York existence with fabulous jobs, four very different children, bringing their own drama, which she adores; a divorce and a second marriage which adds to the act of juggling work and personal life; and a best friend and confidant, Elite’s COO, Robert Brotherton, who adds new scenarios and offers opportunities to provide “outside” definitions and translations for Orthodox Jewish life.



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Biden to call on ambassador to fight anti-Semitism soon: White House official http://www.jewsformorality.org/biden-to-call-on-ambassador-to-fight-anti-semitism-soon-white-house-official/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/biden-to-call-on-ambassador-to-fight-anti-semitism-soon-white-house-official/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 18:18:20 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/biden-to-call-on-ambassador-to-fight-anti-semitism-soon-white-house-official/ President BidenJoe Biden Aides who clashed with Giuliani intentionally gave him the wrong time to prepare for the Trump debate: Biden book says Eid al-Adha has “special significance” amid the Manchin pandemic to support the candidate for the post of head of public lands PLUS will soon appoint a State Department ambassador general to combat […]]]>

President BidenJoe Biden Aides who clashed with Giuliani intentionally gave him the wrong time to prepare for the Trump debate: Biden book says Eid al-Adha has “special significance” amid the Manchin pandemic to support the candidate for the post of head of public lands PLUS will soon appoint a State Department ambassador general to combat and monitor anti-Semitism, the senior White House official for religious engagement said on Tuesday at a Jewish national conference in Washington, DC.

Melissa Rogers, executive director of the White House’s Office of Faith and Neighborhood Partnerships, told a conference hosted by the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA) that the president would soon appoint a senior official to oversee the anti-Semitism.

Rogers did not specify who the president would appoint.

The announcement was greeted by Mark Wilf, owner of the Minnesota Vikings and chairman of the JFNA board.

“Our JFNA leadership has called for the appointment of a State Department ambassador to combat and monitor anti-Semitism, and we applaud the Biden administration’s commitment to us today to announce the official appointment in the coming weeks, “he said in a statement.

The JFNA event, called “Cabinet Activation Against Anti-Semitism,” drew Jewish leaders from across the United States to tackle the rise of anti-Semitism in the country, including the concerns of Jewish students over university campuses and the role of social media in amplifying hatred against minorities and ethnic groups. groups.

Secretary of State Antoine BlinkenAntony BlinkenGloria Estefan Says US Should Get Involved in Cuba Passport Backlog Threatens to Disrupt Travel Plans of Millions of Americans Protesters Paint “Cuba Libre” in Street Outside Cuban Embassy in DC MORE in June, told lawmakers at a hearing he expected a candidate to fight anti-Semitism to appear before the Senate “very, very, soon”.

Congress elevated the State Department’s Supreme Envoy to Combat Anti-Semitism to Ambassador in January, allowing the Ambassador to report directly to the Secretary of State.

Former President TrumpDonald TrumpGreene gets 12-hour Twitter suspension for COVID-19 disinformation Biden seeks to dump Gitmo PLUS appointed Elan Carr in 2019 to be the special envoy to combat anti-Semitism, and he served until the administration ended on January 20.

In February, more than 50 bipartisan lawmakers wrote to Biden urging him to quickly appoint someone as ambassador, citing an increase in anti-Semitism across the world and widespread manifestations of anti-Semitic rhetoric in the United States. .

They specifically noted that amid the crowd of Trump supporters who stormed the Capitol on January 6, there was a man wearing a “Camp Auschwitz” sweatshirt, referring to the Nazi death camp. where about 1.1 million Jews were killed during the Holocaust.

In the United States, anti-Semitic cases and attacks generally outweigh hate crimes against other religious and minority groups.

Assaults and incidents against Jews and Jewish institutions escalated in May, amid tensions between Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem and an outbreak of fighting between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.

Around this time, Jewish, Democratic and Democratic lawmakers urged Biden to quickly fill the position of roving ambassador to fight anti-Semitism.

–Update at 3:00 p.m.


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Debate on Ethics and Religion: What’s Special about a Place of Worship? Part 1 http://www.jewsformorality.org/debate-on-ethics-and-religion-whats-special-about-a-place-of-worship-part-1/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/debate-on-ethics-and-religion-whats-special-about-a-place-of-worship-part-1/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 00:46:35 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/debate-on-ethics-and-religion-whats-special-about-a-place-of-worship-part-1/ Dahyabhai is curious about the places of worship in a community. “How important is a special place of worship? Is a place of worship compulsory? What are the rules and requirements for a person to be allowed to enter a place of worship of your religion? “ We present the answers to Dahyabhai’s question in […]]]>

Dahyabhai is curious about the places of worship in a community. “How important is a special place of worship? Is a place of worship compulsory? What are the rules and requirements for a person to be allowed to enter a place of worship of your religion? “

We present the answers to Dahyabhai’s question in two parts. This week we have responses from non-Christian and Catholic panelists. Next week we will have three more Protestant responses.

My answer:

Jewish communities believe that it is better to pray in community rather than alone. Any space can be used for community prayer. The synagogue has developed as a focal point for Jewish community life, to be a house of prayer, study and community meetings. There are no strict rules for entering such a space, although it is customary in traditional synagogues for men, including visitors, to cover their heads in spaces of worship. Other prayer garments, such as the tallit (prayer shawl) or tefillin (speech bubbles), are usually reserved for Jewish men and women. Non-Jewish visitors should not wear tallit or tefillin.

Fred Stella, the Pracharak (Minister of Outreach) of the West Michigan Hindu Temple, responds:

Most Hindus would agree with Roman Catholics and Orthodox followers that a place of worship is more than just a building. We consider the sacred space of the temple. The different ceremonies that we perform during the dedication of a temple are numerous and last several days. This has the effect of impressing the idea that when we walk in we are in a very special place that allows us a deeper connection with the divine. At the deepest level, we believe that the cosmos is a manifestation of the divine. From this point of view, a temple is no more “sacred” than the men’s restroom in a biker bar. However, most mortals are not as spiritually equipped to sense the presence of divinity in the latter as they would in the former.

The temples are generally open every day. Ceremonies take place almost daily, but most of the time the building is open to the public for silent meditation and prayer. There is no compulsion to go to the temple. Many Hindus prefer to make their home the main place of worship. Most Hindus have a dedicated room for this. That said, many agree with the idea of ​​balancing individual or family prayer with activities involving the larger community.

We at West Michigan Hindu Temple are happy to welcome anyone who wishes to visit. The only thing we ask is that the shoes be taken off in the hallway. Of course, the same sartorial modesty that one would exhibit in any church or synagogue is encouraged.

Reverend Colleen Squires, minister of All Souls Community Church of West Michigan, a Unitarian Universalist congregation, responds:

Unitarian Universalists are very flexible in terms of what defines a house of worship. There are no mandatory requirements for a space to be considered a place of worship other than it must be accessible to everyone as much as possible. We do not have any special rules or requirements for a person / visitor to enter our worship space.

Father Kevin Niehoff, OP, a Dominican priest who serves as judicial vicar, Diocese of Grand Rapids, responds:

The Catholic Church defines a church as “a sacred building intended for divine worship, to which the faithful have the right of access for the exercise, in particular the public exercise, of divine worship” (Code of Canon Law of 1983, canon 1214 ). There are many references to “the church” in the New Testament. First and foremost, a church is the people of God (eg, 1 Corinthians, Galatians, and Ephesians) and not a building or place of worship.

No, a house of worship is not compulsory. However, having a worthy place for a community of believers to come together and pray together is not necessarily inappropriate.

Everyone is welcome in any Catholic parish. If no one is present, you are respectfully invited to walk around the church. Please avoid the altar platform, chairs on the altar platform or movements near the reserved Blessed Sacrament. Always feel free to take the time to pray and reflect in this holy place.

If people are present, follow their example and respect the faithful. At the time of Communion, please note that non-Catholics are not free to accept the Eucharist, but if you follow the crowds online for Holy Communion, you can fold your arms over your chest and receive a blessing.

This column answers questions of ethics and religion by submitting them to a multi-faith panel of spiritual leaders in the Grand Rapids area. We would love to hear about the ordinary ethical questions that arise during your day as well as any religious questions that you have. Tell us how you solved an ethical dilemma and see how the members of the Ethics and Religion panel would have handled the same situation. Please send your questions to [email protected].

The Rapidian, a nonprofit 501 (c) 3 Community Media Center program, relies on community support to help cover the costs of training journalists and publishing content.

We need your help.

If each of our readers and content creators who enjoy this community platform help support its creation and maintenance, The Rapidian can continue to educate and facilitate a conversation around issues for years to come.

Please support The Rapidian and make a contribution today.


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From Fashion Week to Fashion Week: Julia Haart’s ‘Unorthodox’ Journey Burns Netflix http://www.jewsformorality.org/from-fashion-week-to-fashion-week-julia-haarts-unorthodox-journey-burns-netflix/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/from-fashion-week-to-fashion-week-julia-haarts-unorthodox-journey-burns-netflix/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 11:35:35 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/from-fashion-week-to-fashion-week-julia-haarts-unorthodox-journey-burns-netflix/ “Julia Haart” was born at 42 years old. After more than two decades as Talia Hendler, the pint-sized power has drifted away from her marriage and her strict Orthodox Jewish community in Monsey, New York, and reinvented herself as a force to which you have to be reckoned with in the fashion world. Now the […]]]>

“Julia Haart” was born at 42 years old. After more than two decades as Talia Hendler, the pint-sized power has drifted away from her marriage and her strict Orthodox Jewish community in Monsey, New York, and reinvented herself as a force to which you have to be reckoned with in the fashion world.

Now the Moscow-born style guru is telling his story in a new Netflix show, “My Unorthodox Life,” which premiered globally on July 14.

“When I first left, I didn’t really talk about my past,” Haart told The Times of Israel by telephone on the day of the show’s premiere. “I didn’t want people to know where I was from and my crazy story.”

But more than seven years after leaving behind her old existence, Haart has felt ready to open up her past to millions of viewers around the world.

“I realized that while my experience might not be typical, there are so many women in so many situations who have been told they are less than, or made to feel small. , or that it has been said that they don’t have the right or the capacity to go out and work or to be alone and independent, ”she said. “And I realized I have a responsibility here… it’s a story I have to tell.”

Julia Haart leads a working meeting. (Courtesy of Netflix)

Against all odds, Haart launched his own line of shoes months after leaving the community. She eventually turned that into a job for lingerie brand La Perla, where she met her second husband, her then owner, Italian billionaire Silvio Scaglia. Today, Haart and Scaglia are co-owners of Elite World Group and she is CEO of the multinational model and talent agency.

Brash, blunt and with a new penchant for wearing revealing clothes and dizzying stilettos, Haart is a force both on and off screen. And as the show gains popularity and attention – along with a wave of criticism from some Orthodox Jews – Haart maintains that she still has a deep love and respect for Orthodox Judaism.

“I have religious children, I have kosher cuisine, I have a kosher pizza oven. She’s not a woman with anger in her heart, ”she said. “I want women to have it all, I want them to know how amazing they are and what they are capable of.”

In many ways, the real heart of the show lies with Julia’s four children, who each follow their own path as a result of their mother’s decisions and vary in their levels of adherence.

Batsheva, now 27, married her husband Binyamin at the age of 19, just weeks before her mother’s dramatic upheaval. The couple remain observant, but have drifted towards a more modern approach. Shlomo, now 25, still observes Shabbat but feels in conflict with some aspects of the religion. Miriam, 21, has followed her mother’s path to completely abandon religious observance and explore her sexuality and regained freedom. And Aron, just 15, who divides his time between Manhattan with his mother and Monsey with his father, is vowed to maintain his strict religious lifestyle – and resent the efforts of others to persuade him otherwise.

“As my children progressed, I became less and less religious,” Haart said. “So the Talia [who is mother to] Batsheva and Shlomo were not the same Talia as [the one who was mother to] Myriam and Aron.

Miriam Haart, Batsheva Weinstein and Binyamin ‘Ben’ Weinstein are lounging poolside in the Hamptons. (Courtesy of Netflix)

Haart said it took her several years before she made the decision to completely withdraw from her marriage and religious practice.

“It’s not like one morning I woke up and I was wearing my sheitel [wig] and my stockings and I walked out the door, ”she said. “It was a very gradual process. I started to educate myself and discover the outside world… so their experience was a little different from mine, ”she said, as as she got older she slackened off.

Refreshingly, the series refuses to make Julia’s ex-husband Yosef Hendler the villain, and he even appears on camera multiple times.

“He’s a lovely, kind and good man,” said Haart. “The misery that I had in my marriage, I realize now … had nothing even to do with it.”

“My Unorthodox Life” is about as real and authentic as most reality shows of this genre, that is, not at all. Conversations are staged and scripted, scripts are made and “characters” are performed alongside family members. And yet, the show is, without a doubt, wildly entertaining.

“My Unorthodox Life” is about as real and authentic as most reality shows like this – that is, not at all

For the vast majority of the over 200 million Netflix subscribers who are unfamiliar with the religious Jewish world, terms like “frum”, “tzitzis”, “tznius” and “rebbetzin” (“respectively religious”, “ritual fringes “,” Modesty “and” rabbi’s wife “) appears on the screen with glossary-type explanations.

But those more connected to the observer world will enjoy shopping Julia in the sprawling Evergreen Kosher supermarket in Monsey, dining at Mocha Bleu in Teaneck, New Jersey, or trying to explain the concept of “shells,” the tight underwear worn by many nuns to cover skin otherwise exposed by certain clothing.

Julia Haart with her children Batsheva, Miriam and Shlomo in Atlanta in 2002 (Credit: Elite World Group)

While the whole family’s religious trips are a central part of the show, it’s also about their transition from a middle-class, middle-class existence to one dominated by helicopters, Hamptons, and house staff. The Tribeca family’s penthouse was one of the best-selling prices in the area, and they rent a 12th-century castle when they travel to France for a combination of Paris Fashion Week and the Jewish holiday of Sukkot.

The different accounts of different members of the Hendler / Haart family send conflicting messages about their past levels of adherence. The self-proclaimed community of “heimishe yeshivishe” to which they belong in Monsey is generally not as isolated from the outside world as the Hasidic Satmar sect depicted in the Netflix drama “Unorthodox”. Haart worked as a teacher in a coeducational school and later as an insurance agent, and the family also lived in Atlanta for a period.

Haart, née Talia Leibov, is the eldest of eight siblings. Only one – Chana, who appears on the show – continues to speak to her after she leaves the community, and her parents have also cut off contact, Haart said.

“I just have hope,” she said. “I keep sending love, and someday I’ll get some back.”

I keep sending love, and someday I’ll get some back

And Haart says she has reason to be hopeful, as her ex-husband has moved on to a more moderate approach to religion, and her son, Aron, now attends Frisch School, a co-ed modern Orthodox Jewish school in New York. Jersey. which emphasizes a strong secular education alongside religious studies.

“His school is wonderful, I love it, I love the rabbis, they have been incredibly positive and supportive,” about the show, said Haart. “It’s modern orthodoxy.”

Miriam Haart and Julia Haart in her vast Manhattan closet. (Courtesy of Netflix)

Unsurprisingly, criticism of the show abounded in some circles, especially from Orthodox women who argue that their religious observance has not stopped them from pursuing their dreams. Many have told their own stories under the Instagram hashtag “My Orthodox Life,” including Beatie Deutsch, a marathon runner and Orthodox mother of five.

“Like Julia, I come from a warm and loving Orthodox community. I am a proud mother of five, but I have been able to pursue a career that is rewarding and meaningful to me, ”writes Deutsch, who notes that Netflix has turned down the opportunity to edit a film about her life story. “Netflix will probably never share my story because I’m not controversial or outrageous enough. Because I’m happy and proud of the life I lead… But I will continue to show myself here and share my stories, my authentic voice in as a deeply proud and committed Orthodox Jewish woman, mother, athlete and representative of Israel.

Haart maintains that his problem is not with Judaism, but with the extremism and misogyny that tries to control women’s lives and their career paths.

“I think Shabbos is beautiful, and Yom Tov, if you want to stay kosher, why not? She said, using the Hebrew words for the Sabbath, holidays and strict dietary laws. “I have zero against Yiddishkeit [Judaism]. I think the Jews are amazing. I love being Jewish, I myself have been a victim of anti-Semitism on several occasions.

Restrictions on women “don’t just exist in Judaism, they exist in any basic culture… it’s not about Judaism,” she said. “My problem is with fundamentalism, period.”

Haart, who says she considers herself “a spiritual woman, I believe in God,” still has positive connections to her past life. When she was younger, her 5-year-old brother was killed in a car crash, and the response from the Jewish community has been overwhelming.

“The way the community came together, supported us and took care of us – there is so much benevolence and charity, gratitude, appreciation, I learned so many beautiful things”, a- she declared. “I love the beautiful concepts and precepts that I learned in my community: attention, kindness, taking care of each other.

Julia and Yosef Hendler vacationing in the Colorado Rockies during their first year of marriage. (Courtesy of Elite Global Group)

And with the enormous reach of a platform like Netflix, Haart is humbled at the thought of being teleported to the homes of millions of people around the world. She says she has received hundreds of messages from people inspired by her trip.

“People have unorthodox aspects of their lives, people have suffered, people who have been marginalized or who have been told that they are inferior or that what they think they should be is bad,” she declared.

What she wants viewers, especially those less familiar with Jewish life, to take from the show is an understanding of the broad spectrum of Jewish identity.

“I hope what they get out of it is to see that there are all types of Jews,” she said. “You have people like me and Miriam who are extremely, you know, feminists, leading the way. Then you have Batsheva, who is a religious Jew, who is also leading her way. And you have Aron, who is an even more religious Jew.

At the end of the day, she says, “I hope what people will remember is that Jews are like everyone else. There are different types of Jews, we have different belief systems, and we are human, we bleed.

“There is no anger here. There is just a desire to give everything to women, ”said Haart.



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Tensions at the shrine in Jerusalem on Jewish holy day http://www.jewsformorality.org/tensions-at-the-shrine-in-jerusalem-on-jewish-holy-day/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/tensions-at-the-shrine-in-jerusalem-on-jewish-holy-day/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 14:32:12 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/tensions-at-the-shrine-in-jerusalem-on-jewish-holy-day/ Published on: 07/18/2021 – 4:32 PMAmended: 07/18/2021 – 4:30 PM Jerusalem (AFP) Israeli police clashed with Muslim protesters on Sunday at a shrine in Jerusalem’s Old City, as Jews were on their way there to mark a religious holiday, police said. The tensions and the Jewish pilgrimage to the highly sensitive compound of the Al-Aqsa […]]]>

Published on: Amended:

Jerusalem (AFP)

Israeli police clashed with Muslim protesters on Sunday at a shrine in Jerusalem’s Old City, as Jews were on their way there to mark a religious holiday, police said.

The tensions and the Jewish pilgrimage to the highly sensitive compound of the Al-Aqsa Mosque, known to Jews as the Temple Mount, were condemned by the Palestinians.

Israel’s right-wing nationalist Prime Minister Naftali Bennett backed the state’s decision to allow Jews to visit the site.

According to the police, in the early hours of the morning, “Palestinian youths started throwing stones on the Temple Mount plaza in the direction of the police, who dispersed them.” There were no official reports of any arrests or injuries.

The EU delegation in the Palestinian territories said in a tweet that it was “concerned about the ongoing tensions” and called for no “acts of incitement”.

He also called for respect for the status quo of the site and urged Israeli, religious and community leaders to “urgently calm this explosive situation”.

The incident took place on the Jewish holiday of Tisha Beav, marking the day of the year thousands of years ago when, according to tradition, the two Jewish temples on the Temple Mount were destroyed.

The holy site is in East Jerusalem, which Israel occupied and annexed in 1967, but is administered by the Muslim organization Waqf which reluctantly grants Jews limited access.

A spokesperson for a Jewish group encouraging such visits told AFP that 1,679 pilgrims were in the grounds of the mosque on Sunday morning and afternoon.

The Waqf condemned the “violations and attacks” perpetrated by “fanatic Jewish groups, with the support and political cover of the Israeli government,” he said in a statement released by the Palestinian official website Wafa, saying that Israel “aimed at a religious war”.

# photo1

And the Palestinian Authority accused Israel of “undermining the security and stability of the region” by allowing “incursions” of worshipers.

Newly sworn Prime Minister Bennett, who belongs to Israel’s religious right but heads a coalition comprising left-wing and Islamist parties, said he had “ordered that organized and safe visits by Jews to the Temple Mount continue, while maintaining order at the site ”.

In a second statement following the condemnations of the Waqf and the PA, Bennett stressed that “freedom of worship on the Temple Mount will also be fully preserved for Muslims”, referring to the upcoming Eid holiday. al Adha.

Two years ago, as Jewish and Muslim holidays coincided, violence at the site left dozens of Palestinians injured and led to seven arrests.


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Manitoba Jewish community adopts College of Physicians proposal on circumcisions http://www.jewsformorality.org/manitoba-jewish-community-adopts-college-of-physicians-proposal-on-circumcisions/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/manitoba-jewish-community-adopts-college-of-physicians-proposal-on-circumcisions/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 16:38:27 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/manitoba-jewish-community-adopts-college-of-physicians-proposal-on-circumcisions/ Manitoba’s physician regulator vows it will uphold religious and human rights, after proposed change raised concerns in the local Jewish community over its ability to continue the traditional rite of infant circumcision boys. A draft of a new College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba standard of practice, as currently drafted, would mean that Manitoba […]]]>

Manitoba’s physician regulator vows it will uphold religious and human rights, after proposed change raised concerns in the local Jewish community over its ability to continue the traditional rite of infant circumcision boys.

A draft of a new College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba standard of practice, as currently drafted, would mean that Manitoba physicians would only be allowed to practice traditional Jewish brit milah within the confines of a medical facility or a doctor’s office.

It’s an inappropriate restriction on a number of fronts, critics of the college’s proposal say.

The rite is something best done in a private home or synagogue as it introduces the baby to the religious community, Congregation Rabbi Anibal Mass told CBC News on Friday.

Mass was one of five Manitoba rabbis who co-signed a feedback letter to the College of Physicians regarding the draft standard. The letter, obtained by CBC, describes their frustration and opposition on a number of grounds, including lack of evidence of risk.

“There is no evidence to support that the brit milah is not safe,” reads.

‘Why now? What is the problem?’

The rite of circumcision on the eighth day of a male child’s life is a fundamental Jewish practice that believers regard as not a medical procedure, but a religious procedure that is part of a larger and vital community ceremony. .

The college says its proposed standard of practice is being developed to minimize the risks associated with a range of specific in-office medical procedures, with male circumcision among many outlined in the draft.

But its potential interference with the activities of the Mohels doctors (the Hebrew title of the person who performs circumcision) has caused great concern among local Jewish religious leaders, legal experts and the B’nai Brith Canada advocacy group.

” Why now ? What is the problem ? Read the letter co-signed by the Manitoba rabbis.

“The Jews have been doing this for decades with trained doctors. In fact, our Jewish community in Winnipeg is fortunate to have Jewish doctors who have undergone special training in this procedure and the rituals and blessings that go with it, and who have performed this task outside of their offices. and in a non-hospital setting for years. “

Mohel Manachem Fleischmann, left, holds a baby in his arms after a circumcision ceremony at a Berlin synagogue in a 2013 file photo. Winnipeg’s Rabbi Anibal Mass says he knows two mohels in the city, all of them two doctors. (Markus Schreiber / The Associated Press)

Mass told CBC he was aware of two mohels in Winnipeg. Both are doctors and would therefore be bound by the college’s proposal. The standard of practice would have no impact on a mohel who is not a doctor because he would not fall under the jurisdiction of the regulator.

This in itself is an issue that could create greater risk, University of Manitoba law professor Bryan Schwartz told the College of Physicians in a lengthy written brief he shared with CBC on Friday.

“Denying the ability of mohels doctors to conduct a home brit milah can mean that the most experienced and medically expert person is not available for a family,” Schwartz said.

Additionally, having to take a newborn to a health facility could expose them to an unfavorable environment, he said.

“Given the potential impact on the viability of Jewish families to maintain their faith and way of life, the college is required under human rights law to take into account the specifics of the brit milah and carefully calibrate any limitations that might affect the way she is performed, “Schwartz said.

The college promises an amendment

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba provided extensive responses to questions posed by CBC. He said the proposed standard was developed by a working group established last year and has been released publicly for consultation and feedback.

“While focusing on the standards of care in the profession, the task force was informed by various complaints that the CPSM has received over time,” said Registrar and CEO, Dr. Anna Ziomek.

“Common issues raised are about communication, informed consent, conflict of interest, infection or other complications,” she said.

Ziomek said the college recognizes there are issues with the draft standard and will take action to resolve them.

“We recognize that as currently written, this would involve a practicing CPSM member performing male circumcision outside of an appropriate medical facility,” Ziomek said.

“This was not the intention when drafting the standard. At a minimum, the working group will consider adding an exemption to the standard for male circumcision performed in a religious ceremony or tradition. “

Understanding how people might interpret the standard was the purpose of writing and researching public comment on it, Ziomek said.

“We want to assure the public that the standard will not infringe any human or religious rights and freedoms.”

Schwartz noted that the provincial government has recognized the brit milah as distinctive in its health regulations.

He suggested that the college incorporate the language used in the regulations to define an exemption into its finalized standard of practice.


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NYDEGGER: Jesus’ “stripes” healed us for the glory of God | Religion http://www.jewsformorality.org/nydegger-jesus-stripes-healed-us-for-the-glory-of-god-religion/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/nydegger-jesus-stripes-healed-us-for-the-glory-of-god-religion/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 04:00:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/nydegger-jesus-stripes-healed-us-for-the-glory-of-god-religion/ What is black and white and black and white and black and white? No kidding, it’s Siena Cathedral. This Tuscan treasure, located atop the highest point in Siena, Italy, is striped outside and inside with alternating bands of greenish-black and white marble. It is not an optical illusion, but an architectural tribute to the symbolic […]]]>

What is black and white and black and white and black and white?

No kidding, it’s Siena Cathedral.

This Tuscan treasure, located atop the highest point in Siena, Italy, is striped outside and inside with alternating bands of greenish-black and white marble.

It is not an optical illusion, but an architectural tribute to the symbolic colors of the city, black and white. The medieval “Duomo di Siena” (its Italian name) is almost 800 years old.

Built on the site of a 9th-century church, construction began in 1215 and ended in 1263. For a bit of sober color, the builders accented the facade with red marble.

Tuscan Romanesque architecture combined with Gothic ornamentation give this Cathedral of Santa Maria, built in the shape of a Latin cross, a visually stunning exterior. A golden lantern, resembling the sun, crowns the structure’s hexagonal dome. The adjacent 252-foot-high striped spire, containing six bells, adds to the beauty of the building.

Her inner beauty also dazzles. Magnificent striped columns rise from the floor halfway up to the ceiling to support large arches. Resting on these arches, the ribs of the massive vaulted roof crisscross from side to side, surrounded by stained glass to let God’s natural light shine upon man-made art. Frescoes, sculptures and panels by renowned Italian artists Donatello, Bernini, Giovanni, Piccolomini and many others adorn the structure.

Not to be overshadowed, the marble mosaic floor is also majestic. Fifty-six inlaid panels, depicting scenes from the Old Testament and other historical events, transform the cathedral floor into a work of art.

There is nothing clear about the striped “Duomo” of Siena.

There was nothing extraordinary in the life of Jesus. This was one of the reasons why many Jewish religious leaders and most ordinary Jews rejected the idea that he was their prophesied and long-awaited Christ.

They made fun of Jesus because he was from Nazareth. Jewish scholars knew that the Scriptures predicted that their Messiah would be born in Bethlehem, just outside of Jerusalem. They believed that their Christ would enter the holy city and the temple of God with pomp and appearances as befits a king. They concluded that God would surely have nothing to do with Nazareth, a hinterland town without a reputation and Jesus’ hometown.

Perhaps they should have asked him where he was born rather than assuming that he had always lived in Nazareth!

The Jews demeaned Jesus and his family members, suggesting that they had nothing special, that they would never be members of the royal family.

“Isn’t that the carpenter’s son?” Isn’t her mother called Marie? And are not his brothers James and Joseph and Simon and Judas? And aren’t all her sisters with us? (Matthew 13: 55-56).

In other words: “Jesus, we know your family. You are not king! Far from it! ”In fact, religious leaders have insinuated that he was illegitimate by birth and possessed by a demon (eg John 8:48), hardly the kind of person they believed God would be associated with. They regarded him as a deceived aspiring Messiah.

Jesus rejected popularity and acclaim during his ministry. He often frequented the sick, the sick, the infirm and the poor. He taught women, prostitutes, Samaritans and the “dregs” of Jewish society.

“Why is your teacher eating with tax collectors and sinners?” His disciples were questioned (Matthew 9:11). Intimation? That God would never allow His Messiah to associate with that kind of outcasts and scoundrels.

On another occasion, a religious leader said to himself sarcastically, “If this man were a prophet, he would know who touched him and what kind of woman she is – that she is a sinner.” ).

However, Jesus was not an impostor or a setter. God never wanted his Son to be a political king, a military hero, or a social beginner. Writing 600 years before the birth of the Messiah, the prophet Isaiah predicted details about the Messiah.

“He had no form or majesty that we should be looking at, and no beauty that we should desire. He was despised and rejected by men, a man of sorrows and accustomed to pain; and as one from whom men hide their faces, he was despised, and we did not esteem him. But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the chastisement that brought us peace was upon him, and by his stripes we were healed. (Isaiah 53: 2-3, 5). “

At the end of his ministry, Jesus was scourged (leaving stripes) and crucified. Three days later, he rose from the dead, proving that, regardless of what one thought, he was indeed the Messiah, the Christ, the Anointed and the Son of God.

Quoting Isaiah, the apostle Peter gave the essence of the gospel in 1 Peter 2:24: “He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live for righteousness. . By his wounds (scratches) you were healed.

Were you crucified with Christ by baptism into his death, burial, and resurrection? Have his stripes become yours? Have you been spiritually healed?

Gregg Nydegger is the evangelist at the Church of Christ in Monticello.


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In German town of 30 Jews, restored Art Deco synagogue will house interfaith efforts | JTA http://www.jewsformorality.org/in-german-town-of-30-jews-restored-art-deco-synagogue-will-house-interfaith-efforts-jta/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/in-german-town-of-30-jews-restored-art-deco-synagogue-will-house-interfaith-efforts-jta/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 16:53:11 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/in-german-town-of-30-jews-restored-art-deco-synagogue-will-house-interfaith-efforts-jta/ (JTA) – For years after World War II, the magnificent Goerlitz synagogue in Germany housed a family with goats and pigs. The roof of the Art Deco building was collapsing; the government almost demolished the whole structure. But this week, that same synagogue – the only one in the state of Saxony to survive the […]]]>

(JTA) – For years after World War II, the magnificent Goerlitz synagogue in Germany housed a family with goats and pigs. The roof of the Art Deco building was collapsing; the government almost demolished the whole structure.

But this week, that same synagogue – the only one in the state of Saxony to survive the Kristallnacht pogrom of 1938 – was converted into a place of worship and space for interfaith gatherings after some 30 years of renovation and restoration. .

The synagogue of the Görlitz Cultural Forum – which will soon house both Jewish religious services and interfaith cultural events – was revealed in a ceremony broadcast on Monday in an event that had been repeatedly postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. Norwegian Jewish singer Bente Kahan performed, and local and national politicians, rabbis and other dignitaries made remarks.

Completed in stages over the years, the restoration was “done with love,” although it did not fully restore the synagogue, said Alex Jacobowitz, cantor and president of the city’s Jewish community. For example, the tablets of the sanctuary with the Ten Commandments have not been restored, nor the stars of David outside the building, nor the words of the Exodus that once adorned the entrance: “And let them do from me a sanctuary, that I can dwell among them.

But the small Jewish community – less than 30 members – and its supporters raised some 70,000 euros (roughly $ 83,000) to cover the cost of replacing a giant Jewish star that once stood on the building’s dome, visible at for miles around in the town of some 55,000 near the Polish border.

Architects William Lossow and Hans Max Kuhne designed the synagogue, which could accommodate the entire community of around 600 Jews when it first opened in March 1911. The town of Goerlitz had many Jewish institutions at the time. Jacobowitz told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. He recently published a book on the synagogue.

During the Crystal Night pogrom in November 1938, the Nazis burned down the building, but local firefighters extinguished the flames. A few years later, many Jews in the community were deported and killed during the Holocaust.

After the war, the building – located in the former East Germany – fell into disrepair. For a while, it was used to store theater props, and it was also home to a local family and their farm animals. The city bought the synagogue from the remaining Jewish community in Dresden in 1963, then officially bought it back at the Conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany in 1990 after the country’s unification.

A group of local citizens defended its restoration. Ultimately, the costs of some 12.6 million euros (about $ 15 million) were borne by the federal and state governments, as well as private foundations and individuals. The first thing to repair was the roof, in 1990.

As a finishing touch, the new star is expected to be placed on the dome later this year, Jacobowitz said.

“After many decades, the Jewish community in Görlitz finally has a place for prayer and break again,” the German Orthodox Rabbinical Conference said in a statement on Monday. “We hope that the Görlitz synagogue will be a place of exchange and meeting for all citizens on this side and on the other side of the Neisse river, in order to learn much more from each other and from each other. and breaking down prejudices. . “

In a gesture summing up years of interfaith effort, the son of a Protestant pastor who worked in the town donated his own Steinway piano to the space, saying he would “now find a new home” in the town. where he grew up.

Speakers at Monday’s event included the mayor of Goerlitz, Octavian Ursu; the Prime Minister of Saxony, Michael Kretschmer; and Rabbi Akiva Weingarten from Dresden.

“I have always found it important that the synagogue continues to show its scars,” Jacobowitz told the Jewish Telegraph Agency, “to show that the history of the Jews of Goerlitz will not be destroyed by political exigency.

The post In a German town of 30 Jews, a restored Art Deco synagogue will house interfaith efforts that first appeared on the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.


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Beloved ‘Bitcoin Rabbi’ deals with religious and financial herds on Twitter http://www.jewsformorality.org/beloved-bitcoin-rabbi-deals-with-religious-and-financial-herds-on-twitter/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/beloved-bitcoin-rabbi-deals-with-religious-and-financial-herds-on-twitter/#respond Mon, 12 Jul 2021 01:15:25 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/beloved-bitcoin-rabbi-deals-with-religious-and-financial-herds-on-twitter/ JTA – Many of Twitter’s cryptocurrency fanatics are often notorious trolls, but one thought leader in particular stands out above the rest. He happens to be a rabbi. “People on Twitter use it to yell at each other and not be nice, which I don’t like,” says micro-influencer Rabbi Michael Caras, also known as @thebitcoinrabbi. […]]]>

JTA – Many of Twitter’s cryptocurrency fanatics are often notorious trolls, but one thought leader in particular stands out above the rest. He happens to be a rabbi.

“People on Twitter use it to yell at each other and not be nice, which I don’t like,” says micro-influencer Rabbi Michael Caras, also known as @thebitcoinrabbi. “I like to connect with my two communities via Twitter, both Jewish Twitter and Bitcoin Twitter.”

Caras, a rabbi associated with the Chabad-Lubavitcher Hasidic movement, is fascinated by how Bitcoin, both the network and the asset, relates to halacha (Jewish law). And since he’s talked about it enough online, Caras says strangers sneak into his Twitter posts every week asking for spiritual advice and guidance on the matter.

Prior to serving as a public bridge between the two worlds, Caras studied at Yeshiva Ohr Tmimim in Israel and now teaches both Judaism and technology classes at Maimonides Hebrew Day School in New York City. Caras has been interested in Bitcoin since 2017, and in 2019 he published a children’s book about it which sold over 10,000 copies.

The book, a secular introduction to basic economics for kids, tells the story of children learning how to use Bitcoin for cash by running a lemonade stand in a town called Bitville.

Caras has also spoken in synagogues and Jewish youth groups on Bitcoin and Judaism, including how the history of money is discussed in the Torah.

“There are people who are Jewish but non-practicing who have never spoken to a rabbi at any other time,” he says. “Because they feel a kind of kinship with me through Bitcoin Twitter, they will feel comfortable that I give them relevant information without lecturing them.

“I also have a WhatsApp chat where people often ask me for advice in private. Sometimes they have a Bitcoin issue, one way or another, and I’m happy to help. I’m happy to be this resource for the community, especially for things like private key management.

Although there are now thousands of things called cryptocurrency, Bitcoin is the oldest and most decentralized blockchain network in the world, with the most diverse user population as of 2021. People can store, send and receive currencies like Bitcoin without a third party, like a bank.

Most avid cryptocurrency users keep track of transactions with a public network and a ledger called a blockchain. For example, the Bitcoin ledger is a record of all transitions with Bitcoin (the asset). However, many cryptocurrency traders prefer to use traditional financial markets (such as Fidelity or the Israeli company eToro), which do not necessarily need to use the public blockchain for all transactions.

Illustration: A line of potential Bitcoin buyers outside the Bitcoin Embassy in Tel Aviv, December 2017 (Simona Weinglass / Times of Israel)

Caras is among the avid users who prefer to participate in the basic Bitcoin network, transacting with open source tools rather than just trading cryptocurrencies like stocks.

Caras, like many rabbis, is a huge fan of old records, great books, and sacred secrets. Regarding the “private key management” he mentioned, bitcoin users keep track of their bitcoin using a unique password called a private key – protect that key and the bitcoin will stay under. your guard. This is why knowledge related to private key management is so important to Caras.

The public blockchain ledger is reminiscent of how Jewish communities have kept written records of their companies for thousands of years. This combination of history and technology fascinates Caras.

“We literally have ‘the chain of tradition’ in Hebrew, that point of following tradition in written history,” he says. “We’re chasing a chain, and it’s a continuous chain. There are soft forks and hard forks within Judaism, different customs, like protocols, which are compatible with each other.

Caras, 31, grew up in a “fairly secular” home, he says, and was considering a computer science degree before moving on to rabbinical school. His brother, also a well-known Bitcoin advocate, became more religious after visiting a Chabad house as a teenager and Caras followed suit.

Now a father of six and an observant member of the Chabad movement, Caras finds many similarities between Cypherpunk philosophy and Judaism. He is not alone, as there are many WhatsApp groups for Jewish crypto fans, including the “Jewish Crypto Chat” where Caras is one of nearly 190 participants.

I answer questions like: could this marriage transaction be done with bitcoin?

“Judaism has a lot of legal frameworks for how money is used. A Jewish marriage is a transaction. The groom puts a ring on his finger because he needs to give him something of value under the chuppah [wedding canopy]. [In private DMs] I answer questions like: could this marriage transaction be done with bitcoin? ” he says.

As a family, Caras and his wife see bitcoin stewardship as part of their family virtues.

“I hope most of the time we’re using this technology for good,” he says. “This is what I like to encourage people to think about.

There is always a way to apply Torah guidance to the new puzzles of the modern world. Some people have asked Caras to run trading robots or mine bitcoin on Shabbat, or if checking bitcoin’s ever-fluctuating price (its value against the dollar) disrupts a day of rest.

Bitcoin is often used to donate to charity and to secure savings. On the flip side, there are, of course, some controversial and harmful ways to use bitcoin. For example, Hamas – the militant group that rules the Gaza Strip and is considered a terrorist organization by the United States and Israel – allegedly raised funds using cryptocurrency.

Caras, who has lived in Israel for four years at the rabbinical school and has a brother who lives there, says he thinks a lot about the Holy Land since the last conflict. It is impossible to say exactly how many bitcoin users there are in Israel, although some local exchanges have amassed over 55,000 users (each) and thousands of people are working in the local crypto industry, including some companies that have grown globally to serve millions. (On a much smaller scale, some Palestinian bitcoin dealers also get their wares from the same Tel Aviv crypto hubs.)

Israel’s first Bitcoin ATM in Tel Aviv, June 12, 2014 (Photo credit: Ben Sales / JTA)

Caras strongly believes in Israel’s right to defend itself and hopes that Bitcoin could present economic opportunities that could reduce the hold he says Hamas has over the people of Gaza. Prior to the pandemic, in 2019, several Gaza Bitcoin resellers reportedly transacted more than $ 5 million in cryptocurrency each month for civilian use cases such as international purchases, paying tuition fees to overseas or accepting independent payments without PayPal or credit cards.

“I am not concerned that Hamas is using relatively small amounts of bitcoin to finance its terrorism, as it seems rather insignificant compared to their other methods of funding,” Caras said. “Terrorists use cell phones and electricity and any other kind of technology that most people use for good and peaceful purposes… I am happy that individual Palestinians can use money that cannot be easily controlled or taken. by the Palestinian Authority or Hamas. “

This sentiment is common among Caras compatriots on Twitter. Israeli investor Eylon Aviv of crypto-savvy fund Collider Ventures, who knows Caras and enjoys his Twitter feed, said that “the promise here is that Palestinians do not depend on the financial services provided by these terrorist organizations.”

Aviv also agrees with Caras that Bitcoin ethics complements Jewish ethics.

“Basically every party is about ‘inserting someone dominating who tried to kill us,’ they fail and we celebrate. The celebration is about the freedom and liberation that occurs around the unsuccessful elimination attempt, ”said Aviv, adding that censorship, resistance, loss and liberation are all recurring themes throughout Jewish history. .

I am happy that individual Palestinians can use money that cannot be easily controlled or taken away from them by the PA or Hamas.

As a tool for self-sovereign transactions, people fleeing a dictatorship or freely transacting despite persecution often use bitcoin.

And some Jewish users like Aviv wonder if Bitcoin would be useful if a Holocaust-like situation happened again, with governments and armies seizing assets from Jewish communities. It would be easier to escape with Bitcoin.

Israeli crypto industry veteran Danny Brown Wolf thinks so, saying that “being Jews pretty much all of us in our family history have some form of immigration history that involves being forced to leave assets behind ”.

“Given this history, Jews of all peoples should appreciate financial sovereignty,” she said.

To be clear, Caras is not an advocate of a ‘blockchain revolution’. He only answers questions when asked and firmly considers himself a “maximalist,” meaning he only uses Bitcoin, no other cryptocurrency. He believes that users’ energy is better spent on Bitcoin rather than exploring new token experiences.

“I’m a hardcore maximalist. I don’t think blockchain has a use case outside of Bitcoin and securing the Bitcoin blockchain, ”Caras says. “My brother in Israel tells me about all things blockchain under the sun, but I haven’t seen anything positive that is useful beyond that yet. “

Instead, Caras prefers to contemplate what the Jewish law says about loans and interest, for example, so that he can learn on his own and help others learn to apply Jewish ethics to the way he manages his Bitcoin.

“Every piece of technology in this world is up to us to choose for ourselves,” says Caras, “whether we use technology for better or for worse. “



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British Chief Rabbi: Ban on chilled meat could make Jewish life in Northern Ireland ‘unsustainable’ http://www.jewsformorality.org/british-chief-rabbi-ban-on-chilled-meat-could-make-jewish-life-in-northern-ireland-unsustainable/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/british-chief-rabbi-ban-on-chilled-meat-could-make-jewish-life-in-northern-ireland-unsustainable/#respond Sat, 10 Jul 2021 14:26:15 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/british-chief-rabbi-ban-on-chilled-meat-could-make-jewish-life-in-northern-ireland-unsustainable/ UK Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis has warned that it may become “unsustainable” for Jews to live in Northern Ireland due to an upcoming ban on imports of chilled meats from Britain, as part of the country’s Brexit deal with the European Union. The ban does not include an exemption for kosher meat, which the religious […]]]>

UK Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis has warned that it may become “unsustainable” for Jews to live in Northern Ireland due to an upcoming ban on imports of chilled meats from Britain, as part of the country’s Brexit deal with the European Union.

The ban does not include an exemption for kosher meat, which the religious leader of Northern Ireland’s Jewish community said could result in “the community’s complete death,” the BBC reported on Friday.

In the deal under which the UK left the EU, Northern Ireland must continue to meet block product standards, including a ban on the import of chilled meats, such as sausages or minced meat from non-member states such as the UK.

The ban was supposed to go into effect on June 30, but its implementation was postponed until the end of September.

While the community of less than 100 Jews can import chilled kosher meat from EU member Ireland, they say it costs too much, according to the broadcaster. Meanwhile, the ban will prevent them from acquiring the meat elsewhere in the UK, due to the trade barrier created with Northern Ireland as part of the Brexit deal.

The report quotes a statement by the Chief Rabbi describing the situation as “unintentional collateral damage resulting from the current trade differences between Britain and the EU”. He called for a solution for “this precious and historic Jewish community, enabling them to bring essential food supplies and items necessary for the observance of festivals.”

He added: “These are existential concerns, as there is an increasing risk that living together will become unsustainable. “

By way of illustration: A photo of the old synagogue in Belfast. (Northern Ireland Friends of Israel via JTA)

The rabbi also thanked UK Secretary for Northern Ireland Brandon Lewis for pledging to work with the EU to find a solution.

David Kale, the religious leader of the Jewish community of Northern Ireland, has expressed concern for the future and called for a religious waiver to the ban on importing kosher meat from non-member states of the EU.

“Our religion forces us to eat kosher and unfortunately no one can live without eating,” he told the BBC.

Kale also said members of the Jewish community living in old age residences or in hospital depend on kosher meals on wheels from Britain – England, Scotland and Wales.

Speaking in the House of Commons on Wednesday, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson warned that the effect of the ban on imports of kosher meat from Britain could lead to an “exodus” of Jews from Northern Ireland .

“We want to do everything we can to prevent this,” he said, while acknowledging that the problem was “far from over”.

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