Jewish religion – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 15:13:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.jewsformorality.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T151402.937-150x150.png Jewish religion – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ 32 32 Yom Kippur 2022: what you need to know http://www.jewsformorality.org/yom-kippur-2022-what-you-need-to-know/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 15:00:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/yom-kippur-2022-what-you-need-to-know/ For those unfamiliar with Yom Kippur, here’s a breakdown of the most important holiday in the Jewish faith. ST. LOUIS – Jews around the world will soon observe Yom Kippur, also known as the Day of Atonement. It is considered the most important holiday in the Jewish faith, according to History.com. Yom Kippur falls in […]]]>

For those unfamiliar with Yom Kippur, here’s a breakdown of the most important holiday in the Jewish faith.

ST. LOUIS – Jews around the world will soon observe Yom Kippur, also known as the Day of Atonement.

It is considered the most important holiday in the Jewish faith, according to History.com. Yom Kippur falls in the month of Tishrithe seventh month of the Hebrew calendar.

Here’s everything you need to know about the holidays.

What is Yom Kippur?

Yom Kippur marks the end of the 10 days of admiration, a period of introspection and repentance that follows Rosh Hashanah. On this sacred day, God decides the fate of everyone, according to tradition. Jews are encouraged to make amends and ask forgiveness for the sins of the past year.

The holiday is observed with a 25-hour fast and a special religious service, according to History.com. Both Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah are known as the “high holy days” of Judaism.

According to tradition, “God judges all creatures during the 10 days of fear” and decides whether they will live or die in the coming year. God “writes the names of the righteous in the book of life” and “sentences the wicked to death on Rosh Hashanah.”

RELATED: Rosh Hashanah: What You Need to Know About the Jewish New Year

Observing Yom Kippur

Jews who observe the holiday use it as a time to pray, do good deeds, look back on past mistakes, and make amends.

On Yom Kippur, work is prohibited. Jews will participate in church services, which will skyrocket synagogue attendance, History.com said.

According to the Torah, all Jewish adults must abstain from food and drink between sunset the evening before Yom Kippur and nightfall the following day. The sick, the elderly and women who have just given birth are exempt from fasting.

It is believed that fasting “cleanses the body and mind, not as a punishment”. Some religious Jews also abstain from bathing, washing, using cosmetics, wearing leather shoes and having sex, according to History.com.

Similar to Rosh Hashanah, rabbis and their congregations read a special prayer book called the machzor. The blowing of the shofar – a ram’s horn – is also performed on Yom Kippur. A long bell rings at the end of the final service to mark the end of the fast.

RELATED: Yes, Hanukkah Is Considered a Relatively ‘Minor’ Jewish Holiday

When is Yom Kippur?

This year, Yom Kippur begins on the evening of Tuesday, October 4 and ends on the evening of Wednesday, October 5.

Customs of Yom Kippur

Pre-Yom Kippur holiday – Families and friends gather for a feast. The idea is to have enough strength to last for 25 hours.

Break the fast – After the final service, people go home for a meal. It usually consists of comfort foods like blintzes, noodle pudding, and baked goods.

Wear white – White is a symbol of purity, according to History.com. Some married men wear kittens – white shrouds – to signify repentance.

Charity – Some Jews donate or volunteer in the days leading up to Yom Kippur. “This is seen as a means of atoning and asking God’s forgiveness.”

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The spiritual depth of the works of Marc Chagall http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-spiritual-depth-of-the-works-of-marc-chagall/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 19:44:30 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-spiritual-depth-of-the-works-of-marc-chagall/ The Jewish artist maintained a creative connection to his Hasidic faith and was able to translate it into a “universal” language. It was Pablo Picasso who claimed that after the death of Henri Matisse, no other painter had been able to “obtain color” like Chagall. As Vittoria Traverso explains in her article on Chagall’s stained-glass […]]]>

The Jewish artist maintained a creative connection to his Hasidic faith and was able to translate it into a “universal” language.

It was Pablo Picasso who claimed that after the death of Henri Matisse, no other painter had been able to “obtain color” like Chagall. As Vittoria Traverso explains in her article on Chagall’s stained-glass windows, his “dreamlike style and choice of subjects—love, faith, grief—gave his works a deep humanity that stood out from most abstract and intellectual creations of his modernist contemporaries. In a word, his work was decidedly embody.

The book by visual artist and psychoanalyst Jennifer A. Swan Of the Spirit and of Self: The Religious Art of Marc Chagall, explains Chagall’s place in the history of 20th century art as an essentially religious artist. In the words of Dr. Murray Steinauthor of The Bible as a dreamSwan’s book “captured the astonishing breadth of Marc Chagall’s spiritual vision. It is an artist [Chagall] for our time of division, a bearer of healing.In short, Swan’s book explains how Chagall was able to draw from the sources of his own Hasidic Jewish faith and tradition and “translate” them into a “universal” language – that is, he would go to the heart of his own religious experience. , to clarify and express it in a visual language that is symbolically dense but still accessible to everyone. In this direction, “Chagall was one of the most prolific and important religious communicators of the 20th century.”

The director of the Marc Chagall Biblical Message Museum in Nice (France), Jean-Michel Foray, claimed that Chagall was the painter who “returned to art the elements that (most) contemporary artists rejected, such as allegory and narrative – art as commentary on life”. This preservation of the role of art as comment is part of Chagall’s Jewish heritage, Rabbinic literature composed mainly of collections of biblical commentaries.

In reality, Pope Francis has referred to Chagall’s ‘White Crucifixion’ as one of his favorite paintings, emphasizing its “narrative” power. In a biography published in 2013, Pope Francis: Conversations with Jorge Bergoglio: His Life in His Own Wordsthen-Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio said the “‘white crucifixion’ of Marc Chagall, who was a Jewish believer, is not cruel, but hopeful […] The pain is depicted there with serenity. For me, it’s one of the most beautiful things he painted.

“The White Crucifixion” by Marc Chagall

© VATICAN MEDIA / CPP

On François’ predilection for this painting, Denver Diocese website Note that:

“White Crucifixion” was painted in 1938, on the threshold of World War II, after Chagall learned of the horrific Nazi programs against Jews. In the painting, a crucified Christ is surrounded by scenes of terror and devastation. Above the cross float three rabbis and a Jewish matriarch, in obvious dismay. A man in the lower left flees with the Torah, as on the right we see the Jewish holy book in flames. A man in green runs off with his backpack slung over his shoulder, while below him a distraught mother cradles her child – an image reminiscent of so many recent photographs of Syrian and Iraqi refugees fleeing the brutality of more immediate conflict.

On the left of the canvas is a boat presumably full of emigrants, while above them a village is overturned and in flames, its inhabitants and their possessions scattered amidst the chaos. Although Pope Francis spoke about this painting many years ago, it is sadly even more relevant today as the land is currently experiencing its worst refugee crisis since World War II.

Windows of Peace by Chagall

Traverso’s article explains how, in the early seventies, the Russian-born master began to work with stained glass. “In 15 years,” Traverso continues, “Chagall designed iconic shimmering blue windows in synagogues and churches across Europe which are now known as windows of peace.” Having spent much of his life in Catholic France, Chagall was interested in spreading a somewhat “universal” message of peace, love and tolerance using both Jewish and Christian themes.

Metz Cathedral stained glass window by Marc Chagall ©Sabine de Rozières – 5
Stained glass window by Marc Chagall in Metz Cathedral © Sabine de Rozières

“For me, a stained glass window is a transparent partition between my heart and the heart of the world,” said Chagall. “It’s uplifting and uplifting.”

MARC CHAGALL
NOTRE-DAME CATHEDRAL
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Rosh Hashanah, Jewish New Year, is a Solemn Time of Reflection | New http://www.jewsformorality.org/rosh-hashanah-jewish-new-year-is-a-solemn-time-of-reflection-new/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 09:45:42 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/rosh-hashanah-jewish-new-year-is-a-solemn-time-of-reflection-new/ JOHNSTOWN, Pennsylvania — One of the most important holidays in the Hebrew calendar begins at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday. Rosh Hashanah, or Jewish New Year, commemorates the creation of the universe and serves as a two-day time for reflection and prayer. The local celebration centers on a special service at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at Congregation […]]]>

JOHNSTOWN, Pennsylvania — One of the most important holidays in the Hebrew calendar begins at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday.

Rosh Hashanah, or Jewish New Year, commemorates the creation of the universe and serves as a two-day time for reflection and prayer.

The local celebration centers on a special service at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at Congregation Beth Shalom of Johnstown, 700 Indiana St., Westmont. It inaugurates the Jewish year 5783.

“It’s a very solemn assembly,” Rabbi Irvin Brandwein said.

“We come together to pray for a year of life, peace, health and well-being for us, our loved ones, our community and the whole world.”

There will be no loud parties or fireworks.

“It’s not like the secular New Year, although we believe in making resolutions for the better and honing our character and improving our behavior,” he said.

The service traditionally includes the blowing of the shofar, a trumpet-like instrument usually made from a ram’s horn. In ancient times, the blowing of the shofar announced important events, such as the Sabbath, the new moon, and the anointing of a new king.

The sound of the shofar is meant to awaken listeners and alert them to the judgment to come.

It is also rung on the second day of Rosh Hashanah and again during the closing service of Yom Kippur.

Jews traditionally eat apple slices with honey as part of the service. The treats “symbolize the sweetness of the year that we hope to enjoy and experience,” Brandwein said.

Rosh Hashanah marks the start of 10 days of repentance, also known as the Days of Awe, which culminate in the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur, a 25-hour period of fasting, reflection and prayer.

Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are the two “high holy days” of the Jewish religion.

“The whole period is one of multiplying our efforts and acts of loving-kindness and charity,” Brandwein said.

“We take stock of our past year. It’s very personal.

Randy Griffith is a multimedia reporter for The Tribune-Democrat. He can be reached at 814-532-5057. Follow him on Twitter @PhotoGriffer57.

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Standing with the Word of God | Cardinal George Pell http://www.jewsformorality.org/standing-with-the-word-of-god-cardinal-george-pell/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 18:00:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/standing-with-the-word-of-god-cardinal-george-pell/ QSome time ago, during his seminary days, a young priest friend of mine attended an introductory conference on Revelation and Scripture. The speaker told the class that there is a considerable distance between the true message and instructions of God and the texts we have in the Old and New Testaments. The lecturer wasn’t saying, […]]]>

QSome time ago, during his seminary days, a young priest friend of mine attended an introductory conference on Revelation and Scripture. The speaker told the class that there is a considerable distance between the true message and instructions of God and the texts we have in the Old and New Testaments. The lecturer wasn’t saying, like the superior general of the Jesuits, that we don’t know what Christ taught because they didn’t have recorders at the time, didn’t have phones to capture the instant. But she was heading in this direction.

My friend innocently asked if the Second Vatican Council had said anything about this. The speaker, confident in her expertise, explained that yes. What was the document called? Quick as a flash, the answer came: “Dei Verbum“, the Word of God. It wasn’t until she stopped to smile and appreciate her contribution that the speaker realized she had been beheaded. The scriptures are God’s words to us, written in different forms and styles and at different times by human authors. Although they were not dictated by the Archangel Gabriel, as Muslims claim in the Koran, they remain for us the Word of God.

The two major themes that ran in creative tension throughout the four sessions of the Second Vatican Council in Rome (1962-1965) were “updating“, or update things, and”healing», or to go back to the sources for inspiration. The two terms, of course, cover a multitude of meanings. We read the signs of the times to bring the Church up to date. But as the Swiss Protestant theologian Karl Barth asked Pope Paul VI: up to date with what? When and where is the truth found?

For Catholics, what are the sources? Unlike Protestants, Catholics had explicitly appealed, as the Council of Trent taught, to both Scripture and Tradition. Dei Verbum, or the Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation, developed over the four sessions, was one of the best contributions of the Council, resolving many intellectual tensions within the Church and ecumenically. The God of the Bible is not a human creation, nor an oppressor, but reveals himself and his message of salvation through Jesus Christ, “the mediator and the sum total of revelation”.

Scripture and Tradition are linked, come from the same divine source and tend towards the same goal. Tradition transmits the Word of God, which was entrusted to the apostles by Christ the Lord and the Holy Spirit. “Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture constitute a single sacred deposit of the Word of God” (Dei Verbum, 7–8). These perspectives were reaffirmed almost unanimously at the Roman Synod of the Word of God in 2008.

In these postconciliar times, the Catholic Church, like other Churches and confessions in the West, faces something new in its history. She lives in certain countries where many, sometimes a majority, are irreligious, even anti-religious. The ancient pagans of Roman times were not irreligious – most were superstitious, believing in many deities. All who love Christ and their Christian communities mourn Western disbelief, but are often bitterly and fundamentally divided on how best to turn the tide.

The problem can be stated in several ways. Are the teachings of Christ – and especially the Catholic ideas about sacrifice and sexuality, about the need for prayer and repentance – simply outdated, outmoded, as is the belief that the sun revolves around the earth? Did the theory of evolution and millions of years of dinosaurs knock Judeo-Christian mythology off its perch? Should we believe with Comte that the century of religion is over, that it is no longer possible to keep Christianity up to date?

Believers, of course, reject these radical forms of disbelief and confront the situation in more nuanced terms. The modern world has made remarkable progress in reducing poverty and illiteracy, decreasing hunger and increasing longevity. The dramatic advances in science, technology and medicine are undeniable. In these matters we certainly know much more than our ancestors, though too many of our young people are frail and miserable, shackled by habit in various unsavory ways. Youth suicide rates in Australia, for example, are far too high. Why this contrast between progress and increased suffering?

As we continue to believe in our loving Creator God and continue to admire the beautiful teachings of Jesus, the Son of Mary, who was crucified by Roman and Jewish religious authorities nearly two thousand years ago, do we not realize- we no better than ever that while Jesus was a genius and a prophet, he was a man with the limits of his age, his culture and his religion? So are Christians allowed, along with high-ranking German-speaking prelates, to reject fundamental Christian teaching on sexuality because they believe that such teachings no longer correspond to modern scientific knowledge? More than that, are Christians compelled by modern science to reject such and similar Christian teachings?

Two recent developments are noteworthy. At the recent assembly of the German Synodal Path, nearly two-thirds of German bishops seemed to have gone some distance in the direction of rejection, and the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith made no comment. Now the Belgian bishops are on the move. Those forces that want to destroy the monopoly of heterosexual marriage, that ancient Judeo-Christian moral teaching, and to legitimize homosexual activity, are working to spread their poison.

The New Testament describes the duty of the Successor of Peter, the man of rock, the cornerstone (Mt 16, 18), to strengthen the faith of his brothers, especially when some of them weaken (Lk 22, 32). There is now a need for decisive action by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, to prevent further deterioration and to correct errors.

Cardinal Jean-Claude Hollerich’s statement that he no longer wants to change the doctrine of the Church is welcome, and Cardinal Reinhard Marx has also taken a step in this direction. These are good developments; but what about the majority of German bishops?

Who holds the truth in this dispute? Enlightened Western opinion and its German Catholic sympathizers, or traditional Christian teaching supported by the overwhelming majority of faithful Catholics? How does a Christian decide? What are the criteria ? We could return first to the Catholic Catechism, or to the Code of Canon Law, but a return to the terminology and the teachings of the Second Vatican Council is also useful.

Where is the last word to discover? The answer depends on the truths under discussion, for the Church has no special expertise in deciding the truths of science, history, or economics. However, the Old and New Testaments teach, along with the Catholic magisterium, that revelation has jurisdiction in morals as well as in faith. Therefore, moral truths must be recognized and accepted in the apostolic tradition.

It is Catholic teaching that the pope, bishops and all the faithful are the servants and defenders of the apostolic tradition, with no power to reject or distort the essentials, especially when the tradition is expanded and explained. What is challenged when one rejects the fundamental moral teaching on sexuality (for example) is not a paragraph of the Catholic Catechism, nor a canon of Church law, nor even a conciliar decree. It is the Word of God itself, entrusted to the apostles, which is rejected. We don’t know better than God.

If divine revelation, as found in the scriptures, is accepted as the Word of God, we submit and obey. We stand under the Word of God.

Cardinal George Pell is prefect emeritus of the Vatican Secretariat for the Economy.

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“The Jews of Greco-Roman Egypt and the Transmission of the Book of Abraham” http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-jews-of-greco-roman-egypt-and-the-transmission-of-the-book-of-abraham/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 02:54:39 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-jews-of-greco-roman-egypt-and-the-transmission-of-the-book-of-abraham/ Newport Beach, California at sunset. (Wikimedia Commons public domain image) Today’s reading in the new issue of BYU studies was Stephen O. Smoot and Kerry Muhlestein, “Prophets, Pagans, and Papyri: The Jews of Greco-Roman Egypt and the Transmission of the Book of Abraham,” BYU Studies Quarterly 61/2 (2022): 105-134. Stephen O. Smoot holds an MA […]]]>

Newport Beach, California at sunset. (Wikimedia Commons public domain image)

Today’s reading in the new issue of BYU studies was Stephen O. Smoot and Kerry Muhlestein, “Prophets, Pagans, and Papyri: The Jews of Greco-Roman Egypt and the Transmission of the Book of Abraham,” BYU Studies Quarterly 61/2 (2022): 105-134. Stephen O. Smoot holds an MA in Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations from the University of Toronto and is a doctoral candidate in Semitic and Egyptian Languages ​​and Literature at The Catholic University of America in Washington DC. Kerry Muhlestein, Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), is a professor in the Department of Ancient Scripture at Brigham Young University. Here are some of my reading notes:

  • “A question that remains open to scrutiny is how a purported autobiography of the patriarch Abraham could have been transmitted from his time (probably around 2000-1800 BC) to the Ptolemaic period (when the Joseph Smith papyri were created ) – a journey of well over a millennium and a half! How possible or likely is it that a copy of Abraham’s writings could have been recovered at a point in history so far removed from his time? How was the text transmitted and when? And by whom? And for what purpose(s)? And what is the likelihood that Abraham’s writings were associated with a seemingly unrelated collection of funerary papyri with anything Jewish or biblical? (106-107)
  • “To answer the question of how a putative copy of the writings of Abraham could have been transmitted to Greco-Roman Egypt (and subsequently into the possession of Joseph Smith), this article will first examine the evidence that demonstrates a Jewish presence in Greco-Roman Egypt. Egypt. After reviewing this evidence, it will then explore questions related to the direction of cultural exchange between Egyptian and Jewish groups. Did Jewish migrants coming to Egypt absorb more culture? that they imported and spread their own culture and customs? Did Egyptians ever borrow or adapt Jewish ideas and figures? Was there an equal flow of cultural exchange back and forth? What types exchanges are detectable in the surviving evidence? Finally, this article will explore how all of this may shed light on a plausible way in which the Book of Abraham could have been passed down to the Hellenistic era.(107)

The Smoot and Muhlestein brothers acknowledge that their argument for a plausible ancient route of transmission for the Book of Abraham is relevant only “on the assumption that Joseph Smith had in his possession an ancient physical copy of the writings of Abraham” (107). If, however, one posits the notion that the Book of Abraham came by revelation which was simply catalysis by an ancient papyrus which did not actually contain the text – an idea which they expressly say has some merit and is consistent with the belief in the Book of Abraham as authentic ancient writing – their argument will be, as they admit it themselves, essentially irrelevant. Another possibility is that “the Book of Abraham is a pseudepigraphic text composed by a Jewish author during the Greco-Roman period. Much of what is presented in this article may be very relevant to this line of thinking” (107). Why mention these two additional possibilities? Here is their explanation:

“[D]Despite the significant advances scholars have made in recent years, no single theory about the origin of the Book of Abraham can account for all of the evidence. . . . Furthermore, we would like to point out that our presentation of this theory [for a plausible means of manuscript transmission for an ancient Book of Abraham text] does not mean that we strongly favor the theory that the text of the Book of Abraham was on the papyrus over the theory that the papyri served as the catalyst for Joseph Smith’s receipt of a revelation of an inspired scriptural text . We are simply exploring the means by which the text of the Book of Abraham could have been transmitted if this text was actually on the papyrus owned by Joseph Smith. (109, emphasis in original)

Here is my abridged summary of their final summary, which can be found on pages 132-134:

  1. “Archaeological and textual evidence conclusively demonstrates that ancient Jews migrated to Egypt as early as the eighth century BC.”
  2. “In addition to founding new communities with civic and religious structures (including temples), these Jews not only brought with them their religious texts (including the writings of the Hebrew Bible), but also composed and disseminated new literary works while residing in Egypt. . . . This evidence provides a plausible route of transmission for a copy of Abraham’s writings in Egypt.
  3. “Many Egyptianized or Hellenized Jews of the Greco-Roman period retained their religious heritage and identity while also not hesitating to freely syncretize Greek and Egyptian elements with their own traditions and religious texts.
  4. “On the other side of the equation, the polytheistic Egyptians, to whom ‘the very concept of a false god was alien’, also imported Greek and Jewish religious elements into their own religious structures. They intentionally incorporated Jewish religious figures, including Moses and Abraham, into their magical practices and participated in the wider cultural exchange that occurred at the time.
  5. “What we know of Hor, the former owner of P. Joseph Smith I+XI+X ​​(the Book of Breathings), and his occupation as a priest of Thebes (a city that experienced intercultural exchange during the Greco-Roman period) could most likely explain why he might have been interested in a copy of a text like the Book of Abraham.
  6. “The Book of Abraham itself would have found its place in the literary and religious milieu of Greco-Roman Egypt.”

And here is their last paragraph:

“Taken together, the above evidence provides a plausible scenario of how a copy of a text ‘claiming to be the writings of Abraham, while he was in Egypt’, might have been transmitted to Greco-Roman Egypt. by a group of Jewish emigrants and finally [come] in the hands of an Egyptian priest. . . . When it comes to explaining how an ancient copy of the Book of Abraham may have been passed down to Egypt, we can, with some confidence, position ourselves atop this evidence as a solid starting point from which to launch future surveys. (134)

Shipped from Newport Beach, CA


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‘A place for every student’: What Duke religious leaders say about getting involved http://www.jewsformorality.org/a-place-for-every-student-what-duke-religious-leaders-say-about-getting-involved/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 02:40:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/a-place-for-every-student-what-duke-religious-leaders-say-about-getting-involved/ Whether students seek to belong to a community or discover a new faith, Duke religious leaders invite all students to participate in their activities. Supported by Duke Chapel and Student Affairs, Duke’s Religious life groups consists of 21 officially recognized organizations and three affiliated chapel-sponsored groups, including Jewish Life at Duke, Muslim Life at Duke, […]]]>

Whether students seek to belong to a community or discover a new faith, Duke religious leaders invite all students to participate in their activities.

Supported by Duke Chapel and Student Affairs, Duke’s Religious life groups consists of 21 officially recognized organizations and three affiliated chapel-sponsored groups, including Jewish Life at Duke, Muslim Life at Duke, and the various Christian groups on campus.

Christian Life at Duke

In addition to being the center of religious life on campus, the chapel also serves as a hub for the Christian faith. He supports groups such as Duke Catholic Center, Duke Lutherans and Duke Orthodox Christian Fellowship.

Students can get involved in Christian life at Duke by participating in cultsthe Chapel Scholars Program or by singing in one of the three rooms of the Chapel choirs.

“The Chapel is more than a building; it is a living, breathing community of people,” said Luke Powery, Reverend and Dean of Duke Chapel.

Ten years ago, Powery became involved in religious life at Duke because he felt called to foster community and mentor students. He wants the students to focus on a holistic learning experience, concerning the faith of the students.

“Don’t leave a part of yourself out of the classroom, bring your whole being into the classroom,” Powery said.

Students can meet the chapel staff at their offices inside the chapel. Students wishing to see Powery should email Ava West, Dean’s Assistant.

“We are here for you, to serve and support you, during your time at Duke,” Powery said. “There would be no other reason for us to be here, if it wasn’t for the students.

Jewish Life at Duke

Jewish Life at Duke is made up of the Freeman Center for Jewish Life and the Rubenstein-Silvers Hillel. Jewish Life at Duke offers opportunities for students to get involved, such as Sunday bagel brunches at the Freeman Center and free Shabbat dinners open to all students, regardless of religion.

Campus Rabbi Elana Friedman hopes “every Duke student will join us at least once for our Shabbat experience.” Friedman came to Duke because she felt drawn to working with students on campus as they explored their spiritual and intellectual pursuits.

“No matter your background, education, or level of Jewish knowledge (or, indeed, if you’re even Jewish!), there’s a place for you here in our building, our program, and our community,” Friedman wrote. .

The physical address of Jewish Life at Duke is the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, which is located at the corner of Swift Ave and Campus Drive at 1415 Faber St.

The Center of Muslim Life

The Center of Muslim Life offers students a place to “explore Muslim identity, celebrate Muslim and Islamic cultures, build community, and engage with Islam in spiritual, social, and intellectual ways.” Students can get involved through the Jumu’ah prayer service, KitabConnect which is a weekly program to study the Quran, Fajr breakfast club and more.

“We all have the ability to broaden our knowledge and our horizons by getting to know each other,” Director and Chaplain Joshua Salaam wrote in a statement posted on the Center’s website. Since beginning her role in 2018, Salaam brings unique Air Force service experience working with large Muslim communities for many years.

The Center for Muslim Life is located at Few Quad GG.

Although students may be more familiar with the larger centers on campus, many other smaller religious organizations also strive to support students of all faiths. The complete list of Religious Life groups at the Duke can be found on the Duke’s Chapel website.

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ACLU Lawsuit Says Abortion Ban Violates RFRA http://www.jewsformorality.org/aclu-lawsuit-says-abortion-ban-violates-rfra/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 03:05:04 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/aclu-lawsuit-says-abortion-ban-violates-rfra/ INDIANAPOLIS — A lawsuit filed last week by the ACLU of Indiana argues that Indiana’s near-total ban on abortion violates Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act. “Now how can you say that life doesn’t begin at fertilization? Of course it does. There is life out there. But the question people need to focus on is this […]]]>

INDIANAPOLIS — A lawsuit filed last week by the ACLU of Indiana argues that Indiana’s near-total ban on abortion violates Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

“Now how can you say that life doesn’t begin at fertilization? Of course it does. There is life out there. But the question people need to focus on is this : Is the life that constitutes a pregnancy a person?” Dr. Jennifer Drobac, Samuel R. Rosen Professor of Law at IU’s Robert H. McKinney School of Law, said.

This is the question that arises in the trial. The ACLU filed the complaint on behalf of the advocacy group Hoosier Jews for Choice.

“There is a feeling in the Jewish community that this bill restricts our religious freedom. That in my community’s understanding of Judaism and the ways in which we practice our Jewish traditions, abortion is not just something that should be open to us, but could even be mandated by Jewish law,” Elly Cohen, co-chair of Hoosier Jews for Choice, said at an event Wednesday night.

“In the Jewish faith, the life of the mother is believed to be paramount, and we do not believe that a person begins before birth, at least for me and for some Jews,” Amalia Shifriss, Co-Chair of the Hoosier Steering Committee Jews for Choice said Wednesday.

The Jewish faith is not the only one mentioned in the trial. There are also five anonymous women listed, all of whom follow different religions.

The suit reads: “Islam does not believe that the fetus is endowed with a soul at the time of conception and some Muslim scholars hold that the fetus does not possess a soul until 120 days after conception.”

According to Drobac, the government can only impose limits on religious freedom for a compelling reason.

“They’re going to argue that their irresistible interest is the baby’s life. And who doesn’t love babies?” Drobac says.

Now it’s up to the court to decide. The first hearing, regarding whether or not the judge will grant a temporary order to prevent law enforcement while the case is being argued in court, is scheduled for October 14. Whichever way it goes, Drobac says it will continue to be debated in court and at the ballot box.

“The law is not a perfect tool. Changing the law sometimes takes time,” she said. “This Constitution is worth fighting for. Our democracy is worth fighting for.”

A full copy of the lawsuit is available here.

]]> Germany celebrates 70 years of compensation for Holocaust survivors http://www.jewsformorality.org/germany-celebrates-70-years-of-compensation-for-holocaust-survivors/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 10:25:47 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/germany-celebrates-70-years-of-compensation-for-holocaust-survivors/ 1 out of 2 FILE – Nahum Goldman, chairman of the Jewish Claims Commission, center, signs agreements between Germany and Israel during a ceremony in Luxembourg September 10, 1952. On December 8, 2022, Germany had agreed to pay approximately $1.2 billion (€1.18 billion) for home care and compensation for Holocaust survivors living around the world […]]]>
FILE - Nahum Goldman, chairman of the Jewish Claims Commission, center, signs agreements between Germany and Israel during a ceremony in Luxembourg September 10, 1952. On December 8, 2022, Germany had agreed to pay approximately $1.2 billion (€1.18 billion) for home care and compensation for Holocaust survivors living around the world in 2023, bringing Germany's total compensation payout to more of 80 billion euros.  The announcement came 70 years after the signing of the compensation agreement that saw Holocaust survivors receive a measure of justice - the so-called Luxembourg Accords.  (AP Photo, File)
FILE - Nahum Goldman, chairman of the Jewish Claims Commission, center, signs agreements between Germany and Israel during a ceremony in Luxembourg September 10, 1952. On December 8, 2022, Germany had agreed to pay approximately $1.2 billion (€1.18 billion) for home care and compensation for Holocaust survivors living around the world in 2023, bringing Germany's total compensation payout to more of 80 billion euros.  The announcement came 70 years after the signing of the compensation agreement that saw Holocaust survivors receive a measure of justice - the so-called Luxembourg Accords.  (AP Photo, File)
FILE - Nahum Goldman, chairman of the Jewish Claims Commission, center, signs agreements between Germany and Israel during a ceremony in Luxembourg September 10, 1952. On December 8, 2022, Germany had agreed to pay approximately $1.2 billion (€1.18 billion) for home care and compensation for Holocaust survivors living around the world in 2023, bringing Germany's total compensation payout to more of 80 billion euros.  The announcement came 70 years after the signing of the compensation agreement that saw Holocaust survivors receive a measure of justice - the so-called Luxembourg Accords.  (AP Photo, File)

1 out of 2

FILE – Nahum Goldman, chairman of the Jewish Claims Commission, center, signs agreements between Germany and Israel during a ceremony in Luxembourg September 10, 1952. On December 8, 2022, Germany had agreed to pay approximately $1.2 billion (€1.18 billion) for home care and compensation for Holocaust survivors living around the world in 2023, bringing Germany’s total compensation payout to more of 80 billion euros. The announcement came 70 years after the signing of the compensation agreement that saw Holocaust survivors receive a measure of justice – the so-called Luxembourg Accords. (AP Photo, File)

1 out of 2

FILE – Nahum Goldman, chairman of the Jewish Claims Commission, center, signs agreements between Germany and Israel during a ceremony in Luxembourg September 10, 1952. On December 8, 2022, Germany had agreed to pay approximately $1.2 billion (€1.18 billion) for home care and compensation for Holocaust survivors living around the world in 2023, bringing Germany’s total compensation payout to more of 80 billion euros. The announcement came 70 years after the signing of the compensation agreement that saw Holocaust survivors receive a measure of justice – the so-called Luxembourg Accords. (AP Photo, File)

BERLIN (AP) — The organization that handles claims on behalf of Jews who suffered under the Nazis said Thursday that Germany had agreed to pay around $1.2 billion for home care and l compensation for Holocaust survivors living around the world in 2023, bringing the total amount of compensation paid by Germany to more than 80 billion euros.

The announcement came as Germany marked the 70th anniversary of the signing of the compensation agreement that saw Holocaust survivors receive a measure of justice – the so-called Luxembourg Accords.

Over 6 million European Jews were murdered by the German Nazis and their henchmen during the Third Reich.

“The Nazi extermination of European Jewry left a horrific chasm, not only in world Jewry, but in world humanity,” said Gideon Taylor, president of the New York-based Jewish Material Claims Conference. against Germany, also called the claims conference.

“These agreements laid the foundation for compensation and restitution for survivors who had lost everything and continue to serve as the basis for ongoing negotiations on behalf of the approximately 280,000 Holocaust survivors living around the world,” added Taylor.

On Thursday, the German government invited hundreds of guests – including Holocaust survivors and members of the Claims Conference – to a ceremony at the Jewish Museum in Berlin to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the agreement and highlight the special responsibility of the country towards the past, the present, and for the future.

“The Luxembourg agreements were fundamental and led to financial compensation amounting to more than 80 billion euros that Germany paid by the end of 2021,” said German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, who also attended the ceremony.

“Survivor payments and the home care program are very close to our hearts,” added the Chancellor.

The Luxembourg Accords, concluded in 1952, created the basis for all subsequent compensation for Nazi persecution.

The negotiations were highly controversial at the time and even led to violent protests in Israel, where some argued that accepting reparation payments – which they called blood money – amounted to pardoning the Nazis for their crimes.

Yet it was the first time in history that a defeated power paid compensation to civilians for loss and suffering.

“As visionary as those original negotiators were, they could not have imagined the profound, long-term consequences of the Holocaust on survivors,” Greg Schneider, executive vice president of the Claims Conference, told the Associated Press.

“No one imagined that maybe 70 years later there would still be elderly Holocaust survivors who were so poor, who were so needy, who were still suffering the dire consequences,” he said, adding that was why the results of this year’s negotiation include a €130m increase in home care.

Among other payments, €12 million in emergency humanitarian payments will go to 8,500 Ukrainian Holocaust survivors, and €170 million will go to a special hardship fund that will affect approximately 143,000 survivors of the Holocaust. Holocaust in the world.

As the number of Holocaust survivors dwindles, it becomes increasingly important to teach future generations about the atrocities committed during the genocide of the Jewish people. Therefore, Germany agreed for the first time in the negotiations to specifically fund Holocaust education – with 10 million euros for 2022, 25 million euros for 2023, 30 million euros for 2024 and 35 million euros for 2025.

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Shaked returns to Jewish Home Party http://www.jewsformorality.org/shaked-returns-to-jewish-home-party/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 18:40:22 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/shaked-returns-to-jewish-home-party/ By Yisrael Price Communications Minister Yoaz Hendel, co-founder with Interior Minister Ayelet Shaked of the now defunct Zionist Spirit party. (Avshalom Sassoni/Flash90) YERUSHALAYIM – Yamina party leader Interior Minister Ayelet Shaked on Tuesday ended speculation about her immediate political future, three days after the Zionist Spirit alliance imploded with Communications Minister Yoaz Hendel . Shaked […]]]>

By Yisrael Price

Communications Minister Yoaz Hendel, co-founder with Interior Minister Ayelet Shaked of the now defunct Zionist Spirit party. (Avshalom Sassoni/Flash90)

YERUSHALAYIM – Yamina party leader Interior Minister Ayelet Shaked on Tuesday ended speculation about her immediate political future, three days after the Zionist Spirit alliance imploded with Communications Minister Yoaz Hendel .

Shaked signed an agreement with the Jewish Home party for a “joint race” in the November elections, confirming reports that she was negotiating a return to the national-religious party where she began her political career.

Shaked and current Jewish Home leader Yossi Brodny have agreed to run their parties together under the Jewish Home banner, pending ratification by the party’s central committee. Approval is likely but not certain, as some would be against his reinstatement in the leadership.

Hendel and Shaked called off their short-lived partnership in a dispute over whether to consider joining a government under opposition leader Binyamin Netanyahu, should he win the election. Hendel was not against it under any circumstances.

On Monday, Shaked made his intentions explicit, saying, “I support a broad government, but I will probably recommend Netanyahu. I will recommend whoever has the most seats and whoever has the best chance of forming a government,” she said.

Brodny also told Army Radio, “We will recommend whoever leads the biggest right-wing party – it’s probably Binyamin Netanyahu,” although he also stipulated that “we are for a unity government” rather than for a restricted government of right-wing religious parties. by Netanyahu.

According to Army Radio, if the deal goes through, Shaked will top the electoral list while Brodny will step down at No. 2.

According to Channel 14, a United Jewish Home slate is around 2%, meaning the bankrupt Zionist mind is no more likely to cross the 3.25% electoral threshold for representation at the Knesset.

However, a source close to Brodny told The Times of Israel that his own polls indicate he could attract between 3.2% and 4.0% of the electorate. This would explain why Shaked opted for Jewish Home, where the chances of returning to the Knesset seem better than Zionist Spirit. Shaked helped Bennett relaunch Jewish Home in 2013. They both left in 2018 to form the New Right party ahead of the April 2019 election and failed to pass the electoral threshold.

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Yamma Ensemble will bring music from the Mizrahi Jewish Diaspora to Race Brook Lodge in Sheffield | Berkshire landscapes http://www.jewsformorality.org/yamma-ensemble-will-bring-music-from-the-mizrahi-jewish-diaspora-to-race-brook-lodge-in-sheffield-berkshire-landscapes/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 10:00:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/yamma-ensemble-will-bring-music-from-the-mizrahi-jewish-diaspora-to-race-brook-lodge-in-sheffield-berkshire-landscapes/ Israeli music group Yamma set took YouTube by storm, racking up literally millions of views for their mesmerizing mix of Middle Eastern music sung in Hebrew, drawn from the vast diaspora of Jewish migration in that region and North Africa. If you are going to What: Concert in the barn at Race Brook Lodge Who: […]]]>

Israeli music group Yamma set took YouTube by storm, racking up literally millions of views for their mesmerizing mix of Middle Eastern music sung in Hebrew, drawn from the vast diaspora of Jewish migration in that region and North Africa.

This fall, after European summer trips from Denmark to Croatia, they will embark on a tour across the United States, taking them from Massachusetts to California, before wrapping up the year in Morocco and Turkey.

They will begin their North American travels in Sheffield, at the rustic Race Brook Lodge.

“We are all excited to come to the United States,” singer and bandleader Talya Solan said by phone from Tel Aviv, Israel.

“Our last US tour was 10 years ago, in 2012. Most of our YouTube audience is there. We’re rehearsing and preparing, and hope everything goes well because we have a very tight schedule. .

Solan formed Yamma – meaning “to the sea” in Hebrew and “mother” in Arabic – in 2010 in preparation for that original US tour. With some personnel adjustments after a year, “the second year we toured very successfully and we’ve now been together for 12 years,” she said.

Yamma, which is a five-member group, will perform as a quartet at Race Brook Lodge.

Solan studied music theory at Tel Aviv University and took private singing lessons.

“I’ve been performing since 2005, doing my own music and musical direction,” she said.

Although she is also a guest vocalist on other projects, Yamma is Solan’s main musical outlet. “I’m the one directing and choosing the material,” she said — working as a team with her fellow musicians, she noted, all of whom are in high demand for other work.







Four musicians standing in a room holding instruments

Israeli musical group Yamma Ensemble will perform on Wednesday September 14 at Race Brook Lodge in Sheffield.




Yonnie Dror is the wind instrument player. “He’s amazing, he plays Middle Eastern instruments and also Western saxophone,” Solan said. He is particularly acclaimed for sounding the Shofar, a ram’s horn more commonly heard at Jewish New Year religious services. “It’s not an instrument, but it knows how to bring out a really good sound out of it,” she added.

Sahar David replaces longtime Yamma percussionist Nur Bar Goren, who stayed home with his new baby. In addition to playing percussion, David sings and also plays the ney, a flute from the Middle East.

Aviv Behar made his debut in the United States, mainly playing traditional Middle Eastern string instruments like the oud and kopuz. He has a successful career in Israeli pop music, Solan said, “but the Middle Eastern side he brings to Yamma is totally different. It’s really amazing that each of this group has other colors, other faces to show in the music.

Behar also composes and writes lyrics in Hebrew. “I like the way he writes poetry,” Solan said.

Yamma mainly performs live outside of Israel. “I sing mostly in Hebrew, we’re the only band from Israel that exports Hebrew lyrics,” Solan said. Outside the country, most Israeli bands sing Diaspora Jewish languages ​​like Yiddish, she said.

“Hebrew is the oldest language, it has been linked to Judaism since biblical times. It is the only dead language that has been revived and is still spoken.

Some of Yamma’s songs include Arabic lyrics, and concerts often begin with a song that switches from Arabic to Hebrew.

“We tried to collaborate with Arab groups,” Solan said, “but it’s very difficult, because they have problems if they are seen with Israelis. We wanted to do a collaboration to launch a new album where I sing in Arabic, and found a band that we really liked, but they told us very kindly that they were not available.

Unlike more familiar European Ashkenazi and Sephardic Judaism, Yamma plays music drawn from the rich Jewish cultures of the Mizrahi diaspora, which stretches from Morocco to former Soviet lands. Their music is both contemporary and traditional.

“We honor and respect our origins and our heritage,” Solan said — a heritage that includes mostly non-European countries, fairly typical for Israelis their age. In a country as relatively young as Israel, she explained, people started immigrating in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, from different corners of the world, and mixed together.

“My mother’s origins are Bulgarian, my father’s are Yemeni. Yonni’s father is Iraqi, Aviv is a mixture of Turkish and Bulgarian parents. Each of us brings backgrounds from both sides.

They are all ethnic Israelis, known as Sabras. “We were born here, but when you go to your grandmother’s house and she talks [another language] with your mom, you can’t miss it,” Salon said.

Migrant Jews brought the ancient Middle Eastern instruments from their homelands, which Yamma uses to perform their music, along with Hasidic tunes, in a heady mix of religious and secular chants.

Musically, Israel was heavily influenced by neighboring Arab countries such as Syria, Lebanon and Egypt, Solan said. Certain musical traditions are immediately recognizable – Arabic music with its quarter tones, the harmonizing polyphonic choirs of Bulgaria. “But there’s not something you can say is Israeli, other than the mix of cultures,” she said.

For people used to the semitone of a piano, the lute-like quartertone of the oud may sound off, she warned.

Yamma draws age-old sounds and rhythms from contemporary compositions.

“[Audiences] let’s hear the tapestry, the color, the richness of contemporary Israeli culture, the traditions but also our own creations, [that reflect] what happened in our lives. We hope they enjoy it.”

Solan can’t wait to start Yamma’s US tour at Race Brook Lodge. “It’s not hectic or noisy, which is why we chose it. After a very long flight, we land in such a peaceful place.

The general manager of the hall, Casey Meade Rothstein-Fitzpatrick, is delighted to welcome them. Ten years ago, the widely traveled documentary filmmaker took over the reins of the historic inn, restaurant and concert hall his family has owned for more than 30 years. He brings eclectic musical interests to the lineup of live shows at his 200-seat Barnspace concert hall and speakeasy in the basement of the Down County Social Club, the latter now returning to weekly events.

The Stagecoach Tavern restaurant, normally closed on Wednesdays, will be open to people coming to this concert, he said.

This is the first group from Israel that he presents. “It’s beautiful music, I don’t need any other reason,” he said. “It’s a fantastic set, I listened to them online and was inspired by their musical sense and their unique sound. We are always interested in welcoming really talented artists from different cultures and exposing people to great music. music they wouldn’t otherwise see live.

Besides American bands, Rothstein-Fitzpatrick orchestrated an impressive array of world music. “We hosted Alsarah and the Nubatones, an urban contemporary ensemble from New York with musicians primarily from North Africa and Egypt,” he said. Also artists from Crete, members of the Brooklyn Raga Massive collective, African kora player, Indian classical music, Dominican and Brazilian bossa nova music, Indo-Middle Eastern influenced Epichorus and esoteric ensemble Tribe of Love almost every year.

“We try to mix genres a bit,” he said.

“I have as much respect for people who want to preserve their tradition as for others who want to embellish and develop it,” he added. “Music and the arts are often the best ways to gain a window into different cultures.”

If you are going to:

What: Race Brook Lodge Barnspace Concert

Who: Yamma All of Israel

Where: Race Brook Lodge, 864 S. Undermountain Road, Sheffield

When: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, September 14

Tickets: $20 to $30. Stagecoach Tavern open for dinner before the event.

Ticket office/Information: www.rblodge.com413-229-2916

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