Jewish ethics – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ Fri, 13 May 2022 18:03:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.jewsformorality.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T151402.937-150x150.png Jewish ethics – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ 32 32 Death of the week of May 13, 2022 – J. http://www.jewsformorality.org/death-of-the-week-of-may-13-2022-j/ Fri, 13 May 2022 18:03:51 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/death-of-the-week-of-may-13-2022-j/ The obituaries are supported by a generous grant from Sinai Memorial Chapel. Zel Bauer April 4, 1931 – May 1, 2022 Zel Bauer Zel Bauer, daughter of the late Dr. Harry Greenberg and Lee Winkler Greenberg, passed from this land peacefully home, surrounded by her loved ones. Born and raised in San Francisco, Zel graduated […]]]>

The obituaries are supported by a generous grant from Sinai Memorial Chapel.


Zel Bauer

April 4, 1931 – May 1, 2022

Zel Bauer

Zel Bauer, daughter of the late Dr. Harry Greenberg and Lee Winkler Greenberg, passed from this land peacefully home, surrounded by her loved ones.

Born and raised in San Francisco, Zel graduated from Lowell High School and went on to a 40-year career as a highly respected residential real estate broker and entrepreneur in Marin County. Starting with Grubb & Ellis, she went on to open her own brokerage, Zel Realty, and became a leading broker and agent mentor at top firms such as Frank Howard Allen and Pacific Union.

Zel was a pioneer in every sense of the word, and with her foresight she spurred Marin’s real estate companies to adopt the newly invented fax machine. Twice elected president of the Marin Association of Realtors, Zel was widely known for being honest and fair. A master negotiator who used the utmost integrity and business ethics in work and life.

She opened her house, graciously inviting people from all walks of life to sit at her table and share in good spirits. She offered her resources and mentorship without hesitation, with generosity and unconditional love. Zel’s cup was full. She traveled the world and lived her life with vigor and optimism.

Zel will be sadly missed by his daughters, Janet Richoux (late Gilles) of France and Ellen Edelstein (Jim) of San Carlos; grandsons Damien Richoux and Terence Richoux (Sandra) of France; granddaughter Kaley Scofield of Los Angeles; great-granddaughter Eliana Richoux of France; brother Bert Greenberg of San Jose; nephew Stephen Greenberg (Marianna) of Grass Valley; niece Lisa Gioia (Jim) of Pleasanton.

Zel’s funeral for immediate family will be held at Eternal Home in Colma. A celebration of life will be planned in June for friends and family.

Donations can be made in his name to Homeward Bound of Marin, whose goal is to end homelessness by providing housing, education and hope.

Sinai Memorial
(650) 369-3636


Jacqueline Relieuse Annes

June 6, 1937 – March 28, 2022

Jacqueline Bookbinder Annes, 84, died peacefully with friends by her side on March 28, 2022. “Jackie,” as her family and friends call her, was born in New York City at Mount Eden Hospital in the Bronx on June 6, 1937 to the late Sam and Harriet Bookbinder. She was the wife of Dr. George Annes of Texas, New York and San Francisco.

Ms. Annes received her BA from Hunter College in the Bronx in 1961 and an AA in nursing from City College of San Francisco in 1976. She was a radioisotope technician in the Bronx at Montefiore Hospital and later worked as a nurse allowed in the OB unit. and Nursery at Mount Zion Hospital and VNA in San Francisco from 1976 to 1988, and with the UCSF AZT/AIDS Research Project at Mount Zion Hospital from 1988 to 1991.

Jackie is writing her own obituary, and she/I have nothing but GOOD things to say about her… (obviously she had a great sense of humor).

She was a compassionate and caring human who volunteered at JFCS with Russian refugees and Marin JCC, donated to numerous Jewish, environmental, homeless, suffrage and community charities medical science.

She was loved and will be missed.

She is survived by her sister Helene Scherer, her nephew Bob Scherer and son Evan, her nephew Doug Scherer and his wife Nelida, their daughter Juliana and nieces Renee Scherer and Melanie Mosier.

Please contact Aldersly Retirement Community (415) 453-7425 or Congregation Rodef Sholom (415) 479-3441 for more information about the memorial.

Please send donations to the St. Francis Foundation at St. Francis Hospital, 900 Hyde St., San Francisco, CA 94109, in the name of Dr. George and Jacqueline Annes, Marin Food Bank, or Bay Area Jewish Healing Center, 2530 Taraval, Ste. 202, San Francisco 94116, or Congregation Rodef Sholom, 170 N. San Pedro Road, San Rafael, CA 94903.


Sheila Feuchtwang

September 1, 1934 – April 26, 2022

Sheila Feuchtwang
Sheila Feuchtwang

Sheila Feuchtwang died on April 26, 2022. She was born in Tel Aviv in 1934 to Max and Betty Winer, the eldest of their four children, including Judy (deceased), Gila and Shlomo. His parents were among the early pioneers who helped found Tel Aviv. Sheila excelled in school, even skipping a grade, and had a sharp mind. She was an avid reader, loved singing and Israel.

His father and mother were pharmacists, and the family lived on the upper floors of the same building his father had built, which housed the pharmacy on the first floor. She fondly remembered her childhood in the early days of Israel, although her family experienced material deprivation and hardship like many others at the time.

Her idealism as a first-generation Israeli teenager was also tempered by the sadness surrounding the Holocaust and existential fear leading up to the 1948 War of Independence, with ultimate redemption and hope in its aftermath.

At 15, Sheila immigrated to the United States with her father and sister, living in Shreveport, Louisiana, then moved to Memphis, Tennessee, for college, where she met fellow Israeli student Thomas Emanuel Feuchtwang. who happened to be in town on a college road trip from Georgia Tech. They soon married and moved to California, where he completed his master’s and doctorate. degrees at Caltech and Stanford, respectively, while she continued her studies in sociology, then worked as a research assistant at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences.

After that, they began their life together across the United States as Emanuel completed his postdoctoral training at the University of Illinois, then held faculty positions at the University of Minnesota and finally at Penn State. University.

She was a loving wife and mother of four children, Orna (Larry), Daphna (Norbert), Jonathan (Robin) and Ilan (Julie). She always retained and helped instill in her children her idealism, Zionism, love of Israel, Jewish history and – despite being a self-proclaimed atheist – her deep knowledge and appreciation of Judaism and its values. humanists.

Both Sheila and Emanuel have dedicated efforts to Jewish causes, including pro-Israel advocacy and activism. Although she looked forward to retiring with Emanuel in Florida, during her final years as a physics professor at Penn State, Emanuel tragically suffered from Parkinson’s disease and she cared for him until when he died in August 2000.

She is survived by her children and grandchildren: Doron, Galit, Tali, Sivan, Ben, Shira, Orli, Eden, Leo, Jordan and Jake, as well as her great-grandchildren Maayan and Meira. May his memory be a blessing.

Donations in Sheila’s memory may be made to any of the following charities: FIDF: Friends of the Israel Defense Forces (fidf.org); JNF: Jewish National Fund (jnf.org); Hadassah: The Zionist Women’s Organization of America (hadassah.org).


Jerome Magidoff

March 26, 1933 – April 29, 2022

Jerry (Jerome) Magidoff died on April 29, 2022 in Walnut Creek, California. Jerry was born on March 26, 1933 in New York City to Isadore and Blanche Magidoff, who predeceased him. Jerry was a graduate of Duke University and law school. He leaves behind his loving family, including his wife Marilyn, his sister Dorothy, Berk, his children Elisa Magidoff (Pacifica, CA) and Michele Magidoff (Piedmont, CA), and his grandchildren Jacob Yedra (Pacifica, CA) and Hannah Sullivan and Sarah Sullivan (Piedmont, California).

In Jerry’s memory, memorial contributions may be sent to PBS.org and the East Bay Jewish Federation and Foundation (jewishfed.org).

Sinai Memorial
(925) 962-3636


Kathy Williams

May 6, 1947 – May 2, 2022

Kathy Williams
Kathy Williams

On Monday, May 2, 2022, Kathy Roberts Williams, beloved wife, mother, grandmother, aunt and friend, died at the age of 74.

Kathy was born May 6, 1947 in Denver, Colorado to Alex Ackland Roberts and Gertrude Jonas Roberts (née Jonas). Kathy lived in Denver, Colorado until she was 4 years old, then moved to Hillsborough, California. As Hillsborough was a growing town, she attended all three elementary schools, starting with South School. Kathy attended Crocker Middle School and Burlingame High School, Class of 1964. She later earned her bachelor’s degree in sociology from San Jose State University in 1969.

In college, she met the love of her life, Donald Williams (z’l). It was the beginning of a real love story. On February 16, 1969, they were married at the Hilton Hotel in San Francisco. Kathy and Don were blessed with 51 years of marriage before Don passed away in 2020. In 1973, Don and Kathy moved to “the countryside” and settled into their home in Hillsborough, California. In 1976 their daughter, Tracy, was born, followed by their son Mike in 1979. Kathy and Don lived out the rest of their years in the beautiful home they built together.

Kathy spent her early years working in a bank before becoming a dedicated volunteer and leader in her community and abroad. Kathy began her volunteer career as president of the Hillsborough Chapter of Women’s American ORT. She went on to hold numerous positions with the Federation of the Jewish Community and several other nonprofit boards and committees, including Peninsula Temple Sholom, Peninsula Jewish Community Center, Ronald C. Wornick Jewish Day School, and Jewish LearningWorks. Kathy’s greatest passion was helping mentor young leaders to take on and continue her work. Her most recent project was advocating for the development of a mentorship program for the PJCC Board of Directors. She has received many awards and accolades over the years, her greatest being the Judith Chapman Award, named after her dear friend and late mentor.

Kathy’s passion for helping others included advocating for social justice locally and globally. She has helped Ethiopian Jews flee to Israel, participated in countless human rights marches and protests, raised funds for women’s rights and “adopted” a family in Rwanda by helping provide for their basic needs and their education.

Kathy was devoted to her family and friends and was proud of everything they did. She enjoyed organizing life events and parties, learning about world issues, and traveling. She has traveled to all seven continents and to more than 86 countries. Kathy was proud to become a bat mitzvah as an adult. Kathy was known for her positivity and smile and was someone to trust and talk to for hours.

Kathy is survived by her beloved children Tracy Stettner (Aaron) and Mike Parker (Finn) and her beloved grandchildren Alex and Jordan Stettner. She is also survived by many beloved family members including in-laws, nieces, nephews and cousins. She was predeceased by her husband Donald Williams, her parents Gertrude and Alex Roberts and her brother Douglas Roberts.

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Debate on the great Jewish writers and thinkers http://www.jewsformorality.org/debate-on-the-great-jewish-writers-and-thinkers/ Wed, 11 May 2022 21:41:45 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/debate-on-the-great-jewish-writers-and-thinkers/ By Rabbi Dr. Dov LernerClinical Assistant Professor at the Straus Center On Wednesday, April 13, the Zahava and Moshael Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought hosted Dr. Abraham Socher, Emeritus Professor of Jewish Studies and Religion at Oberlin College, Editor-in-Chief of Jewish book reviewand author of the recently published book Liberal and illiberal arts: […]]]>

By Rabbi Dr. Dov Lerner
Clinical Assistant Professor at the Straus Center

On Wednesday, April 13, the Zahava and Moshael Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought hosted Dr. Abraham Socher, Emeritus Professor of Jewish Studies and Religion at Oberlin College, Editor-in-Chief of Jewish book reviewand author of the recently published book Liberal and illiberal arts: essays (especially Jewish), in conversation with Straus Center Clinical Assistant Professor Rabbi Dr. Dov Lerner. The presentation was given as part of Rabbi Dr. Lerner’s “Thought of Rabbi Jonathan Sacks” course, which is offered at Yeshiva College in conjunction with the Straus Center. The two discussed the fiery exchange between Rabbi Sacks and Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, the latter having reviewed Sacks’ 2017 book, Not in the name of Godin the pages of Socher’s publication.

Rabbi Riskin, a prominent Zionist cleric and founder of the city of Efrat, accused Rabbi Sacks of seemingly embracing the Diaspora as an ideal and portraying powerlessness as a central tenet of Jewish aspiration. Rabbi Sacks vehemently defended his work, accusing Rabbi Riskin of misreading the proportions of Maimonides – to which Rabbi Riskin responded by reiterating claims that he felt Rabbi Sacks had failed to to counter.

“Abraham himself, the man revered by 2.4 billion Christians, 1.6 billion Muslims and 13 million Jews, ruled no empire, commanded no army, conquered no territory , performed no miracles and delivered no prophecies, Rabbi Sacks wrote in Not with God Name.

Central to their debate was the role and character of the Jewish state – both embodied in the modern state of Israel and in any embodiment of Jewish political power. Rabbi Riskin censured Rabbi Sacks for portraying an “anemic Abraham,” and Rabbi Sacks suggested that Rabbi Riskin deliberately overlooked the toxic mix of religion and power.

“Why does Sacks feel compelled to describe such an anemic Abraham? Rabbi Riskin wrote. “Although Moses Maimonides once described the patriarch as a ‘weak’ philosophical preacher, it was precisely to emphasize the ultimate necessity of political action and power.”

During the semester, students came closer to the thought of Rabbi Sacks in the areas of theology, ethics, and political theory. Hearing Dr. Socher engage their instructor on issues that intersected with all three brought their studies to life in a way that promised to make the rest of the semester even more uplifting.

You can find out more about the Straus Center and subscribe to our newsletter here. Also be sure to like us on Facebookfollow us on Twitter and instagram and join us on LinkedIn.

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Gill Cafiero ’22 receives scholarship to study professional ethics and the Holocaust http://www.jewsformorality.org/gill-cafiero-22-receives-scholarship-to-study-professional-ethics-and-the-holocaust/ Mon, 09 May 2022 20:40:19 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/gill-cafiero-22-receives-scholarship-to-study-professional-ethics-and-the-holocaust/ Each year, the highly competitive program chooses 12 to 15 scholars to spend two weeks in Berlin and Poland, where they visit key historical sites and participate in daily seminars. Run under the auspices of the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York, FASPE examines the role that professionals in business, journalism, law, medicine and […]]]>

Each year, the highly competitive program chooses 12 to 15 scholars to spend two weeks in Berlin and Poland, where they visit key historical sites and participate in daily seminars.

Run under the auspices of the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York, FASPE examines the role that professionals in business, journalism, law, medicine and clergy played in Nazi Germany and how breaches of moral codes can have devastating consequences. FASPE offers scholarships in these five disciplines.

Cafiero joins a diverse group of 80 FASPE Scholars across the five programs who were chosen through a competitive process that attracted applicants from across the United States and around the world. FASPE covers all program costs, including travel, food, and accommodation.

The 2022 scholarship will take place in Germany and Poland. The business program will be led by Nottingham Business School professor Mollie Painter and Paul T. Harper, clinical assistant professor of business administration at the University of Pittsburgh’s Katz School of Business.

Prior to Yale SOM, Cafiero worked in software and network operations for British Airways and Verizon, London. She plans to return to her hometown of Rome to work as a management consultant after SOM.

“I applied for the fellowship for the same reason I applied to Yale SOM — I care about the mission of serving both business and society, Cafiero said. “In Tony Sheldon’s Global Social Entrepreneurship course, I learned that real impact can only be achieved with a clear vision of the desired results and strong evidence that one’s actions contribute to that mission.”

Together with the FASPE team, Cafiero aims to learn from past mistakes. “I hope to refine my personal mission and also have access to a network of global advisors who can help me establish the most impactful ethical business practices,” she said.

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The left’s war on childhood | The Jewish Press – JewishPress.com | Daniel Greenfield | 7 Iyyar 5782 – 8 May 2022 http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-lefts-war-on-childhood-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-daniel-greenfield-7-iyyar-5782-8-may-2022/ Sun, 08 May 2022 01:03:50 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-lefts-war-on-childhood-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-daniel-greenfield-7-iyyar-5782-8-may-2022/ photo credit: unsplash Simpler and healthier days From Greta Thunberg to children put on puberty blockers, the victims of the war on childhood are everywhere. They show up at environmental or gun control rallies holding giant signs in their little hands, they are indoctrinated at school to enlist as child soldiers for the Last Cause. […]]]>

photo credit: unsplash

Simpler and healthier days

From Greta Thunberg to children put on puberty blockers, the victims of the war on childhood are everywhere. They show up at environmental or gun control rallies holding giant signs in their little hands, they are indoctrinated at school to enlist as child soldiers for the Last Cause.

The adults tell them that if they don’t save the world, they won’t even live long enough to grow.

At the heart of the exchange of culture wars political buzzwords is a simple question of whether childhood should exist. Leftists believe that no one can escape political commitments, and therefore the idea that childhood should be a space apart from the causes and concerns of adults is a privilege that belongs to teachers and popular culture to break into pieces.

And it’s the war on childhood that we see all around us, from Disney to kindergarten.

What it is really about is the leftist belief that children cannot be allowed to be children, occupying a separate world of imagination and wonder, but must be indoctrinated into struggle as soon as possible. with The Anti-Racist Baby Book and Baby Loves Green Energy. The only way to save the world is to politicize childhood and turn children into little adults worried about microaggressions, experimenting with sexuality and fearing the end of the world.

Utopia, the dreamland of progressive adults who act like children, has no place for children.

It is the job of adults to save the planet, assuming it needs saving, to debate political causes, to explore whatever needs to be explored when it comes to sexuality, and to build or to destroy their lives as they please.

And it is their main job to protect children from life in this threatening adult world.

The game is the business of childhood. Beginning in the Victorian era, civilized societies worked to create safe spaces for children to grow and learn before it became a term for whiny adults. The reformers and the muckrakers took the children out of the factories. Growing prosperity allowed for the rise of a children’s culture in which a multitude of toys and books aimed at children filled the stores.

The adults protected the children, preserving their innocence as they grew into unique people.

Baby boomers, a generation named after an era of offspring, may have had the last golden childhood in American history. And many never grew up. The generations that followed came of age with the breakup of the American family and now the very idea of ​​family. Indirect harm to children is now eclipsed by direct harm to childhood.

Radical leftists who demand safe spaces for themselves take them away from children. Children are put back to work, not in factories, which would be kinder in comparison, but in radical causes, they are told that they are on the verge of death, that their country is evil and that the world is about to be destroyed if they don’t do something immediately.

This is where the traumatized children who scream in anger at gatherings come from.

Children, especially young children, implicitly trust adults and their parents. If they are told that the world is about to end, that they are racist or that they have to experiment with gender, they believe it.

The adults who rob them of their innocence and their childhood are the monsters.

Instead of growing up feeling safe and protected, children on the left are traumatized from an early age by being forced to think of the world as a dangerous and evil place that their parents cannot protect them from, but must. take responsibility for change. otherwise everyone will die.

The “parentification” of children began with the despair of baby boomers following the end of “Camelot”, the death of left-wing culture heroes and the collapse of the counterculture, followed by the belief that the next generation had to pick up the slack and fix things. Adults who acted like children insisted that children become adults. And these days, precocious children and immature adults are all around us. They are also two halves of the same tarnished coin.

Adults who have not had a secure childhood claim the privileges of childhood as soon as they are economically secure enough to have one. They surround themselves with toys, seek exclusively the most direct pleasures, and claim safe spaces and trigger warnings, for the emotional security they lacked in childhood. But they deny this emotional security to real children and selfishly traumatize them for their own actualization.

Teachers on TikTok freely state that their feelings matter more than the safety of children.

The aggressive push to embed sexual politics in elementary schools is the way dysfunctional adults, including some teachers, prioritize their own sexual identity over the well-being of children.

It also comes down to pushing the policy in general on children at the youngest possible age.

The transgender war on children is just the latest in a series of attacks on childhood by politicizing everything. When African warlords enlist 8-year-olds to champion their causes, we think it’s monstrous, but when leftists turn unstable teenager Greta Thunberg into a heroine and even encourage preschoolers to protest against global warming is activism.

Activism is the beginning of the educational war against childhood. Now the war is not just about how children see the world, but against their bodies. Child soldiers are expected to accept death. The political gender identity movement expects children to have their minds damaged and their bodies mutilated, taking away their ability to have children of their own, as a political commitment.

Even African warlords would find this unfathomably barbaric.

The ancients sacrificed children to the fires of Moloch while the progressives sacrificed them to their passion for enlightenment. Either is a symbolic assertion that the adult’s obsessions are more important than the child’s safety. Civilized adults don’t act that way. Barbarians, which is another way of saying children who inhabit the bodies of adults without the disciplined ethics of adulthood, do things like this because they live in a world of emotional turmoil, insecurity frightening and angry selfishness. They see every encounter as a threat to their fragile identities, their insecurities surround them with humiliating microaggressions, and they retreat from their belief that the world is a threatening place by escaping into fantasies.

Fantasies are supposed to be children’s things, but in the post-modern era, supernatural, conspiratorial, political and utopian fantasies are all around us. And adults are sacrificing children to utopian ideologies that promise a better world is upon us.

All it will take is to destroy the childhood, then the children.

{Reposted from author Blog}

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Torah UBusiness – The Commentator http://www.jewsformorality.org/torah-ubusiness-the-commentator/ Fri, 06 May 2022 04:34:44 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/torah-ubusiness-the-commentator/ In the fall, a YU student asked me an interesting question: “Do Torah Umadda apply to Sy Syms? Isn’t ‘Madda’ only sciences and arts that can help us understand Torah, not business studies? I asked him which volume of the Talmud he is studying this year. “Bava Basra.” What does it cover? “Ownership, partnerships, property […]]]>

In the fall, a YU student asked me an interesting question: “Do Torah Umadda apply to Sy Syms? Isn’t ‘Madda’ only sciences and arts that can help us understand Torah, not business studies?

I asked him which volume of the Talmud he is studying this year. “Bava Basra.” What does it cover? “Ownership, partnerships, property rights, acquisitions, legal documents.”

I asked him who had had the most impact in shiur to help add ideas to what they were learning: non-business students or business students? “Business students — they understand economics much better and can explain ownership issues. The rest of us learn the basics while they can see the nuances and can help us understand them. If so, what kind of knowledge has enhanced Torah learning at YU this year? “Business.”

Every day he and the rest of the YU talmidim saw our powerful combination of Torah UBusiness.

In fact, I told him that he should look at the last mishna in Bava Basra, and the last line of that mishna. Elsewhere, in one of the most important debates in all of the Talmud, Rabbi Yishmael, one of the greatest of all time, has a debate with Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai (Berachos 35b) about making a living. Rabbi Yishmael appears there as the main proponent of the Torah U’Madda. At the end of Bava Basra, What Rabbi Yishmael tells us? “He who wants to become wise should study the monetary law, for there is no greater discipline in the Torah, and it is like a flowing spring” (Bava Basra 175b).

Especially today, Sy Syms embodies the values ​​of YU, not only in substance but also in its ethics.

The missing “U”

In Torah Ubusiness, the Torah itself is world class and we also strive for excellence in business studies. Particular emphasis is placed on the “U” (“and”) that connects them. Otherwise, students are left on their own to figure out how to embrace the different parts of their lives.

Two years ago, Sy Syms presented its Jewish Values ​​Program to fill in the “U”. This is entirely consistent with Sy Syms’ mission: to develop Torah-grounded professionals who excel in the workplace and in the community.

The faculty of Jewish values ​​is world-class talmidei chachamim who also have real-world experience in the fields in which they teach, which makes them much more effective at conveying the “U”. The courses they teach include practical work in the workplace halakhawhich prepares students for the challenges faced in each workplace by teaching from sources and role models how to be a kiddush hashem; Jewish public policy, which prepares students to play a leadership role in the community by understanding community issues; and Jewish business law, which helps them understand the overlaps and contrasts between American law and Jewish law.

This semester, we added three options to complete these three required courses. Students can develop their historical thinking and knowledge by taking the course “Business, Community and Leadership Through the Ages”. They can learn to think rigorously about key life decisions in Designing Your Jewish Life. Finally, students can expand their knowledge of both economic theory and moral and political philosophy in the new Syms Honors course “Jewish Law, Economics, and Philosophy.

These courses make the disciplines of history, philosophy, and psychology tangible by connecting them to the real-world experiences our students will soon have, as well as their Judaism.

Ethics and Integrity Across the Curriculum

Every Sy Syms student is required to take a business ethics course. The students enjoy the course so much that they awarded Rabbi Robert Greenberg, one of the course teachers, their Teacher of the Year award at the first Sy Syms awards dinner I attended. In addition, all honors students take an ethics course taught by my predecessor as Dean, Dr. Moses Pava, a leading expert in business ethics.

However, coverage of ethics and values ​​is not limited to these courses, but rather permeates the curriculum. This was beautifully captured by Tomer Weider, a Sy Syms student who was featured in the Undergraduate Torah Studies newsletter before Passover. Responding to a question about “My favorite part of YU,” Tomer said, “Apart from the Beis Medrash, many of my Sy Syms classes have been imbued with Torah values. My finance, accounting, and other lay teachers deliberately include topics and emphasize the importance of acting honestly and amicably in business.

When it comes to exams, projects and academic integrity, Sy Syms has also been a leader. Two years ago, Sy Syms led the formation of the YU-wide Academic Integrity Committee (AIC). ICE has developed best practices and review processes that have had a significant impact on academic integrity in all undergraduate schools.

Community service outside of the school curriculum

Summer 2020, when other students went through the crisis summer with nothing to occupy them amid COVID, three dozen students participated in the new YU Consulting Group. Through the Advisory Force, these students have led high-impact projects for more than a dozen Jewish nonprofit organizations, making it the summer of the vschesed and help fulfill the “excel…in the community” part of the Sy Syms mission.

Since then, amid the ups and downs of COVID, we hoped we wouldn’t have to keep the Consulting Force running. However, every spring, students have asked to help associations, which themselves have asked to participate in our Consulting Force. These students could take on more lucrative jobs for the summer, but would rather make a positive impact on the Jewish community.

Outside of these formal channels of community support, individual students and groups of students provide hunted for the community and beyond. We expect that from the graduating students to whom we presented our character and service awards this week. However, even our academic stars take time out of their classes to do hunted.

For example, this year’s female valedictorian, Shoshi Tuchman, works with the homeless every Super Bowl Sunday, helping them feel cared for rather than alone. Shoshi is a double major in accounting and finance, but instead of taking a high-paying job at an accounting firm or investment bank after graduation, she plans to major in nonprofits. lucrative. Last week during TEDxYeshiva Universityshe explained her decision in a stellar talk titled “Allowing Your Values ​​to Impact Your Career.”

Our men’s valedictorian has helped the wider community in a different way. In the midst of COVID, in order to help small businesses survive, the government provided a lot of funding, but many small businesses did not know how to apply for it. Jonah Loskove took time off from work and school to help 700 small businesses apply for and receive desperately needed government funding, a feat of hunted For who he received a Congressional Commendation.

Conclusion

Today’s Sy Syms embody Jewish values, instill ethics and excellence, prepare students to become community leaders, and show how far UBusiness Torah excellence can be achieved.

Dr. Noam Wasserman is the Dean of the Sy Syms School of Business.

Photo caption: Every day, he and the rest of the YU talmidim saw our powerful combination of Torah UBusiness.

Photo credit: Yeshiva University

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South Dakota Ethics Committee moves forward on Noem’s complaints http://www.jewsformorality.org/south-dakota-ethics-committee-moves-forward-on-noems-complaints/ Mon, 02 May 2022 17:31:45 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/south-dakota-ethics-committee-moves-forward-on-noems-complaints/ SIOUX FALLS, SD — A South Dakota Ethics Committee decided on Monday to hire an outside attorney as it reviews a pair of ethics complaints against Gov. Kristi Noem, delaying its decision to investigate the allegations of interference by the governor in a state agency evaluating his daughter. application for real estate appraiser license and […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD — A South Dakota Ethics Committee decided on Monday to hire an outside attorney as it reviews a pair of ethics complaints against Gov. Kristi Noem, delaying its decision to investigate the allegations of interference by the governor in a state agency evaluating his daughter. application for real estate appraiser license and state aircraft abused.

After meeting for about an hour in a closed executive session, retired judges who sit on the Government Accountability Board decided they needed legal advice, but shouldn’t come from the lawyer who usually advises counsel because she works in the attorney general’s office. That attorney, Katie Mallery, was recused from legal business in the complaints.

Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg, who is a Republican like Noem, launched the complaints after the media reported Noem’s actions in office. The board’s decision on Monday was a procedural decision as a key moment for complaints approaches.

The board in February asked Noem to respond to the complaints and will eventually decide whether to dismiss them or investigate.

“We haven’t made an initial decision yet, so we’ll be consulting with a lawyer on this,” said board chairwoman Lori Wilbur, a retired Supreme Court justice.

The board’s review of complaints has stretched since last year and has taken place entirely in private meetings. Democratic Rep. Linda Duba, who was at Monday’s meeting, expressed frustration with the laws governing the council, which was created in 2017 but has never addressed high-profile allegations against Israel’s top official. State.

“For a law that was passed that was supposed to provide transparency, we’re in the dark,” she said.

The Associated Press reported that the governor played a hands-on role with the appraiser certification agency as it assessed her daughter’s application for an appraiser’s license in 2020. Just days after the Labor Department and Regulation decided to deny his daughter’s application, Noem called a meeting with his daughter, the Secretary of Labor and the Director of the Appraiser Certification Program.

Agency director Sherry Bren told a legislative committee last year that she felt ‘intimidated’ at the meeting, where she said Peters’ unsuccessful candidacy was discussed in detail and that a plan had been formulated to give him another chance to apply. Noem’s office, defending the governor’s conduct, said the plan was already in the works before the meeting.

The attorney general’s other complaint was prompted by a report by Raw Story, an online news site. Noem in 2019 had used state jets to travel to events hosted by political organizations, including the National Rifle Association and the Republican Jewish Coalition, even though South Dakota law prohibits their use for anything other than business. of State.

Noem, who faces re-election this year and has positioned herself as a White House contender in 2024, called the reports a political attack.

In her daughter’s case, she said she was working to “cut red tape” to address a shortage of assessors. She said she was acting as an ambassador for the state in her use of state aircraft.

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The “moral pandemic” is even worse http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-moral-pandemic-is-even-worse/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 02:02:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-moral-pandemic-is-even-worse/ The covid-19 pandemic is physical, but it strongly highlights a more disturbing pandemic besetting our world, including the United States: the moral pandemic known as selfishness. We are all sometimes selfish about unimportant things, but the selfishness in question here goes far beyond that, as it can literally – and too often these days does […]]]>

The covid-19 pandemic is physical, but it strongly highlights a more disturbing pandemic besetting our world, including the United States: the moral pandemic known as selfishness.

We are all sometimes selfish about unimportant things, but the selfishness in question here goes far beyond that, as it can literally – and too often these days does – put certain lives in danger and in danger. take others. Our Sages of Holy Memory considered selfishness to be among the seven most serious sins imaginable. (See the Babylonian Talmud treatise Arachin 16a.)

Selfishness will be a topic tomorrow when many communities begin a six-week study of Pirkei Avot, the (Ethics) Chapters of the Fathers, beginning with Chapter One. This chapter has much to say about selfishness, especially when he quotes the revered sage Hillel. He wants us to make his most famous adage our own: “If I am not for me, who is for me? But if I’m for me [alone], what am I? And if not now, when?”

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“If I am not for myself” may sound like something a selfish person would say, but then Hillel immediately adds, “But if I am for myself [alone]what am I?” In other words, a person must put themselves forward because they have an obligation to help others. This obligation, adds Hillel, exists immediately when help is needed. “If not now when?” By the time we act, if we act at all, it may be too late. Delaying or refusing help is selfishness.

In various places in the Talmud this notion is developed, often dramatically. For example, in BT Bava Metzia 33a, a mishnah bluntly states that in a situation in which someone’s parent or teacher has lost something, and that person has also lost something, “his own lost object takes precedence” despite Torah commandments to honor and respect one’s parents and, by extension, teachers. It follows that one person’s own loss also takes precedence over someone else’s loss. However, as the gemara that follows this mishnah explains, this only applies if the failure to recover the lost item prevents the person from helping someone else.

The Babylonian sage Rav Yehudah, quoting his teacher Rav, begins the discussion of gemara by noting that this rule is based on Deuteronomy 15:4. ‘there are no needy among you,’ [meaning that] yours takes precedence over anyone else’s. However, he quickly adds, “anyone who [routinely] behaves in this way will eventually become [needy him- or herself].

As the commentator Rashi explained, seen this way, a person’s selfishness is in fact altruism. We cannot help others if we ourselves do not have the resources to do so.

It may feel like a stretch —

sages and commentators twisting the words of the Torah. If the Torah says that what belongs to someone takes precedence, the warning against routine behavior in this way actually invites people to violate Torah law.

It’s no exaggeration, however, because this quoted verse is meant to refer to the much longer statement in which it is found (which we read on the last Shabbat, the last day of Passover). He understands this: “If, however, there is a needy person among you…you should open your hand and lend whatever is sufficient to meet the need…. Give willingly and have no regrets when you do…” There will be no needy, but only if those who are able help those in need.

To repeat, then, selfishness is a sin. Not wearing N95 masks in enclosed settings, refusing to be fully vaccinated and boosted, and refusing to follow social distancing guidelines are acts of selfishness.

Boston Globe columnist Renée Graham was on point when she recently wrote that “for many Americans, having to wear a mask once in a while has been the worst thing about the covid-19 pandemic.” It was what they considered the worst thing, not the more than seven million deaths from Covid-19 worldwide, nor the long-term effects of Covid-19 that many now have to endure, nor the grief that many still feel because of the loss of loved ones.

Graham noted the “jubilant reactions posted on social media” that followed a federal judge’s decision early last week overturning the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s mask mandate for airlines. “Carried away by the selfishness that has prolonged this pandemic, they only think of themselves,” she wrote.

This selfishness begins at the very top. It’s an election year, and government officials from both parties are making decisions based on what will get them the most votes, rather than what will save the most lives. Although the decision on the mask is under appeal, for example, the government has not asked that it be reinstated pending the outcome of that appeal. The judge’s decision stands for now so as not to upset voters.

These are facts: the more transmissible and highly contagious omicron subvariant BA.2 is now responsible for nearly 90% of new covid-19 cases in the United States, with the largest increases noted up to present here in the Northeast and in the Midwest. Two new BA.2 sub-variants – BA.2.12 and BA.2.12.1 – are considered the cause. Another variant, omicron XE, is to be feared.

This rise has prompted colleges in Washington, DC, New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Texas – none of which care about what voters think – to reimpose mask-wearing and other measures. As of this writing, one of them, Howard University, has reinstated distance learning.

Philadelphia reinstated its mask mandate after new cases and hospitalizations there jumped dramatically in the first 18 days of April. However, it only took three days of declining numbers for Philadelphia to cave to the political backlash and end the term.

Most political leaders, including the governors of New Jersey and New York, are also concerned about upsetting voters. Both states are seeing new cases soar, but they prefer to rely on individuals to act responsibly. On April 17, for example, New York Governor Kathy Hochul vowed not to shut down New York City when it is currently the nation’s top covid-19 hotspot. “I’m not going to close it again, you can count on that,” Hochul said. “I’m going to protect the health of New Yorkers, but I’m also protecting the economy.”

Given the degree of selfishness here, reliance on personal responsibility is a huge risk. We’re in the third year of the pandemic, but nearly a quarter of all eligible Americans haven’t even received a single dose of the vaccine, while only two-thirds are fully vaccinated. Enter any closed venue and there will be plenty of people who won’t wear a mask, even if a sign at the entrance says masks are required.

Maimonides, the Rambam, notes that the Torah assigns blood guilt to a person who “acts almost criminally due to negligence or gross negligence”. (See his Mishneh Torah, The Laws of Murder and Preservation of Life 6:4.) This certainly includes those who show callous disregard for the health and safety of others by refusing to take all covid precautions. -19 needed.

The 18th century rabbi and philosopher, Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzatto, sharply criticized the “person who walks through his world without considering whether his actions are right or wrong”, and who does not take “proper precautions to guard against a potential danger” to himself. and to others. (See his Straight Path 2:4.)

The standard excuse these days is that covid-19 isn’t the dreaded disease it was when it started. Tell that to the more than 400 people here who die from it every day, or the roughly 40,000 people here who we know catch covid-19 every day – a number far lower than the actual number because most people at home tests are usually not reported.

Getting a mild case, however, is misleading. For example, according to a recent study published in the journal Nature, even a mild case can significantly affect a person’s brain, shrinking its size and damaging tissues associated with memory and senses such as taste and smell. smell.

New research has also shown that people aged 50 and over who contract covid-19 are 15% more likely than the rest of us to develop shingles, a painful rash that can have devastating effects.

Previous studies have shown that covid-19 can lead to long-term damage to the heart and lungs.

There is nothing sweet about a “mild case”.

And then there’s this: A study published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found that the unvaccinated among us threaten the safety of all who are vaccinated. “The decision to get vaccinated cannot be seen as a simple matter of personal choice, as it has implications for the safety of others in the community,” said study co-author Professor D epidemiology from the University of Toronto, Dr. David Fisman. He added: “Vaccinated people have the right not to have their efforts to protect themselves undermined.”

Jewish law, starting with the Torah, is very clear about this: it is as much a sin to endanger one’s own life as it is to endanger the lives of others. Selfishness is also involved here, as a person who is at risk of contracting covid-19 does not care about the impact their illness or death will have on their family and friends.

Selfishness is a sin. In this case, it could lead to two even greater sins: harming yourself or others, and/or taking someone’s life.

Unfortunately, there is no vaccine to protect us from a moral pandemic.

Shammai Engelmayer is Rabbi Emeritus of Congregation Beth Israel of the Palisades and an adult teacher in Bergen County. He is the author of eight books and the winner of 10 commentary awards. Its website is www.shammai.org.

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Levine, Morton http://www.jewsformorality.org/levine-morton/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 05:17:39 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/levine-morton/ LEVINE, Morton Morton P. Levine, 95, died in Atlanta, Georgia on April 26, 2022, peacefully at home surrounded by family. Morton was born on April 7, 1927 in Mt. Vernon, New York, the third son of Meyer and Esther Levine. He grew up with brothers, Maurice, Sidney and Robert (Bobby) in Mt. Vernon where his […]]]>

LEVINE, Morton

Morton P. Levine, 95, died in Atlanta, Georgia on April 26, 2022, peacefully at home surrounded by family.

Morton was born on April 7, 1927 in Mt. Vernon, New York, the third son of Meyer and Esther Levine. He grew up with brothers, Maurice, Sidney and Robert (Bobby) in Mt. Vernon where his father owned a car dealership.

When World War II slowed new car sales, Morton helped his family by finding work at a factory where he polished plastic ring boxes. He gave his salary to his parents to help pay for food and other needs.

The day after graduating from high school, Morton was drafted into the United States Army. While serving his country, he was promoted to corporal and awarded the World War II Victory Medal. After his honorable discharge in 1947, Morton was admitted to the University of Georgia in Athens, where he pledged Tau Epsilon Phi fellowship.

He then enrolled in law school at the University of Georgia, which allowed him to stay in Athens, a city he had come to love. He earned his JD degree in 1953, becoming the first member of his family to practice law.

He created his own firm in Atlanta, specializing in bankruptcy law. He has proven negotiation and conflict resolution skills in large and small matters. Morton was in the people business, representing a diverse group of clients over the years, many of whom were in the automotive industry, as it was an industry he was familiar with and learned from his father. He was also highly respected by bankruptcy judges across the country and was appointed in over 100 cases to serve as trustee in bankruptcy for the debtor.

Morton was a member of the Atlanta and Georgia bars as well as a founding member of the Southeastern Bankruptcy Law Institute. He was president of the Southeastern Bankruptcy Law Institute in 1978-79. In 2003, the Atlanta Bar Association, Bankruptcy Section, awarded Morton the David Pollard Award, for exemplifying a high level of professionalism and ethics in the practice of bankruptcy. His three sons proudly followed in his footsteps. His youngest son, Ronald, is a partner in the company he founded, now called Levine and Block.

Loved and respected by his peers, Morton cherished the camaraderie he shared with his colleagues. He was considered by his associates to be an energetic and gentle man, devoted to his clients and to his duty as a lawyer.

On June 22, 1958, Morton married Phyllis Louise Borochoff. They raised four children, Jonathan, Russell, Susan and Ronald. Morton, an avid Georgia Bulldogs fan, bought four season tickets to Sanford Stadium in 1954 and has held those same seats for 68 years. Until recent years, he rarely missed a home game and his tailgates in the parking lot across from his fraternity were a sight to behold.

He was a member of the Ahavath Achim Synagogue in Atlanta.

Morton was predeceased by his parents, Meyer and Esther Levine; and his brothers, Maurice and Sidney Levine.

Morton is survived by his beloved wife, Phyllis; her four children; son and daughter-in-law, Jonathan and Allison Levine; son and daughter-in-law, Russell and Anne Marie Levine; son and daughter-in-law, Ronald Levine and Joni Romanek; and his daughter, Susan Levine; ten grandchildren, Olivia, Molly, Alexa, David, Daniel, Andrew, Jamie, Jennifer, Matthew and Rachel, and brother Robert “Bobby” Levine.

Services will be held at the cemetery at 4:30 p.m. at Arlington Cemetery in Atlanta. Participants are requested not to arrive before 4:15 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting that donations be made to the University of Georgia Law School Morton P. Levine Scholarship Fund online at: https://www.law.uga.edu/fund/morton-p-levine-scholarship or by check: payable to: UGA Foundation For: Morton P. Levine Scholarship (72598003), University of Georgia School of Law, Law School Advancement Office 225 Herty Drive, Athens, GA 30602-6012. Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.

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Allegation of discovery of Bible scroll in Iran is false http://www.jewsformorality.org/allegation-of-discovery-of-bible-scroll-in-iran-is-false/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 15:56:57 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/allegation-of-discovery-of-bible-scroll-in-iran-is-false/ Copyright AFP 2017-2022. All rights reserved. Videos shared on social media claim to show a newly discovered original scroll of the Book of Esther, a biblical text that chronicles the deliverance of the Jewish people from a plot to exterminate them in the 5th century BC. But experts say the video shows a document with […]]]>

Copyright AFP 2017-2022. All rights reserved.

Videos shared on social media claim to show a newly discovered original scroll of the Book of Esther, a biblical text that chronicles the deliverance of the Jewish people from a plot to exterminate them in the 5th century BC. But experts say the video shows a document with random Hebrew letters and no indication of genuine antiquity.

“The original book of Esther was recently found in Iran by a Jew who lived there. The scroll is 1500 years old. Beauty is all written in pure gold,” reads the accompanying text of a YouTube. video published on March 19, 2022 and viewed over 3,000 times.

Screengrab from YouTube video taken April 20, 2022

The same video was shared elsewhere on Youtube as well as on top Facebook and Twitter as well as comments on the impressive gold lettering.

But experts said the object in the video – in which an unidentified person is seen unrolling the scroll without gloves or any other preservation technique – is clearly not the Book of Esther or from that period. , according to the writings and marks on the roll.

“It’s a fake,” said Lawrence Schiffman, professor and director of New York University’s Global Network for Advanced Research in Jewish Studies.

“We have an arbitrary arrangement of Hebrew letters. We don’t have the Book of Esther.”

Schiffman said a number of forged antiques have surfaced in the Middle East in recent years, but that this article is not likely to mislead anyone with knowledge of Hebrew or Jewish history.

The text is “gibberish” and the Hebrew vowel marks under the letters came into use much later, in the Tiberian time, Schiffman told AFP.

Additionally, he said there do not appear to be any corrections in the scroll, which is unusual for a handwritten manuscript from ancient times.

“I should see corrections; nobody writes a text in the first version without corrections,” he said.

the Book of Esther tells the story of the Jewish queen who helped prevent a planned annihilation of the Jewish population during the reign of Xerxes I, the king of Persia from around 486 to 465 BC. The Old Testament text inspired the carnival-like Jewish holiday of Purim and was later incorporated into the New Testament.

One of the oldest verified Esther scrolls – also called megillah – was gifted last year at the National Library of Israel. It is thought to date from around 1465.

The roll of the video cannot be credibly linked to any ancient document from this period, said Jodi Magnessan archaeologist and professor of religious studies at the University of North Carolina who has worked extensively in the Middle East and who is a former president of the Archaeological Institute of America.

The use of the Star of David suggests the scroll isn’t even a good fake, Magness told AFP.

“The Star of David did not become a symbol of Judaism until the Middle Ages,” the archaeologist said in a telephone interview from Jerusalem.

“It doesn’t look ancient, but in any case, you couldn’t date it before the Middle Ages.”

Significantly, the video offers no evidence of the object’s provenance, making it impossible to verify as an antique, Magness said.

“Without any documentation of its origins, it’s a no-start for archaeologists,” she said.

“Archaeology is like (the TV show) CSI. You have to have a chain of custody. You have to know where it was found and under what circumstances, otherwise there would be no way to verify it.”

Based on the lack of apparent evidence of its authenticity, Magness said it was not worth subjecting it to scientific analysis and that archaeologists could not make this lack of provenance without violating their code of ethics.

“I wouldn’t waste my time trying to authenticate it,” she said. “It looks like something one of my students would do for a class assignment.”

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The corporate media is hostile to you and your religious beliefs http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-corporate-media-is-hostile-to-you-and-your-religious-beliefs/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 23:48:45 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-corporate-media-is-hostile-to-you-and-your-religious-beliefs/ by Kerry Dougherty Chances are you were too busy last weekend, or too smart, to bother with it. The New York Times. But if you had taken a look, like me, you would have seen this article, promoted to the front page: “In this time of war, I propose that we abandon God.” The editors […]]]>

by Kerry Dougherty

Chances are you were too busy last weekend, or too smart, to bother with it. The New York Times.

But if you had taken a look, like me, you would have seen this article, promoted to the front page:

“In this time of war, I propose that we abandon God.”

The editors of The temperature ran this story on a weekend that is holy for all three major religions: for Christians, it was Easter. For Jews, Passover. And for Muslims, it is part of the holy month of Ramadan.

I read the play, by the way. Written by a Jewish man apparently still haunted by some of the metaphorical stories he heard in his youth about the ancient Jews.

In my opinion, that was drivel. But even drivel has its place.

But why was it released this particular weekend? Does anyone have The temperature do you think the article might be offensive to those with a religious bent? Who in this newspaper thought the timing was perfect?

I spent 42 years in daily newspapers and I believe it was no accident. It was a deliberate boost for believers.

Coverage of religion has always been anemic in most American newspapers. When forced to dabble in reporting with a religious twist, reporters tend to treat the faithful as mere quaint curiosities whose lives are guided by belief in the supernatural.

I can’t find any recent survey of the religious beliefs of American journalists. The closest was a 2008 study by the Pew Research Center that found that only 8% of people working at national publications attended church services weekly. This was well below the national average of almost 40% for the general population.

This perhaps explains why the media remained silent when the governors of the blue states closed the churches two years ago – at Easter, no less! – in a brutal and unsuccessful attempt to slow the spread of COVID-19.

It was then unthinkable. It’s unthinkable now.

Don’t be fooled into thinking the media cares about American values.

The mainstream media dislikes you, disrespects you, and mocks your belief in God.

Act in consequence.

This column has been republished with permission from Kerry: unemployed and unedited.

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