Jewish economy – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 10:17:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.jewsformorality.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T151402.937-150x150.png Jewish economy – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ 32 32 Colonialism, dehumanization and neoliberal state building in Palestine http://www.jewsformorality.org/colonialism-dehumanization-and-neoliberal-state-building-in-palestine/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/colonialism-dehumanization-and-neoliberal-state-building-in-palestine/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 09:16:35 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/colonialism-dehumanization-and-neoliberal-state-building-in-palestine/ The Palestinian Authority continues the Zionist colonization narrative that views Palestinians as economically backward. While the past few months have seen a significant increase in global support for Palestinian liberation in response to Israel’s attempts to forcibly dispossess Palestinians of their homes, the absence of an allegedly important actor has been notable. Said actor, the […]]]>

The Palestinian Authority continues the Zionist colonization narrative that views Palestinians as economically backward.

While the past few months have seen a significant increase in global support for Palestinian liberation in response to Israel’s attempts to forcibly dispossess Palestinians of their homes, the absence of an allegedly important actor has been notable.

Said actor, the Palestinian Authority (PA), has instead focused its energies on the violent repression of Palestinian protests, especially those that arose in response to the PA’s alleged assassination of activist Nizar Banat.

While the Palestinian Authority’s involvement in suppressing Palestinian popular protest may come as a surprise to some, it makes perfect sense to those familiar with the failure of the state-building project that the Authority has sought to pursue in the decades since its creation.

Building the neoliberal state

Among the cornerstones of the Palestinian Authority’s state-building project is a commitment to neoliberal economic principles, solidified by President Mahmoud Abbas’ appointment of former World Bank economist Salam Fayyad as Prime Minister in 2007.

In accordance with these principles, the Palestinian Authority is committed to creating institutions that facilitate the accumulation of capital both within the territories it governs as well as outside them, even – perhaps, above all – to the detriment of the will of Palestinian civil society and the grassroots activists and communities.

Fayyad may have resigned as prime minister in 2013, but the Palestinian Authority has continued to focus on neoliberal state building.

The most charitable reading of such an approach to governance in Palestine suggests that the PA’s intentions are to demonstrate that the Palestinians can govern themselves within the confines of the world’s most hegemonic economic logic.

This approach and prioritization, however, requires subduing the political will, the right to self-determination and the economic agency of the Palestinians because of the inherent paternalism it implies, especially when implemented by the Palestinian people. a leadership whose own popular legitimacy remains deeply suspect.

It also continues a tradition of relying on ideas of economic rationalism as a pretext and vocabulary to dehumanize Palestinians, delegitimize their anti-colonial resistance, and advocate for the colonization of their land.

Historic speeches on Palestinian economic backwardness

The Zionist colonization and colonization of Palestine relied heavily on the perpetuation of myths that erased the presence of Palestinians from their historic homeland.

Even among academics and propagandists who acknowledged the Palestinian presence, accounts of economic backwardness downplayed its importance and even served as a pretext for colonization.

Nahla Zu’bi describes two main trends within Israeli scholarship on the economy of Palestine under the British Mandate. The first trend, represented by historian Smiha Flapan, argued in favor of the existence of “two distinct” national economies “: a” Jewish capitalist economy “, which was able to develop rapidly, and a” traditional and backward Palestinian economy. ”, Which could not do so, due to competition and“ a crisis of modernization of the Arab sector ”.

The second trend, represented by veteran of the Israeli intelligence community Yuval Arnon Ohana, downplays the importance of the economic agency of the majority of Palestinians, suggesting instead that the acts of protest during the mandate were instigated by the political elites. and Palestinian economics who feared the potential impact of Jewish and capital immigration on “their existing status and their means of political and economic control.”

According to Zu’bi, this was because Ohana believed that “British colonialism in Palestine was a force for progress” and that Jewish capital “offered the unemployed fellahs wide employment opportunities” – ignoring the fact that the fellahs (Palestinian agricultural workers) were forced into unemployment primarily because of the expropriation of the land on which they lived.

In addition to the racism inherent in such arguments, the whole premise of the Palestinian economy existing as entirely pre-capitalist during the British Mandate era is false; Palestine had already been an important part of the world capitalist system in the 19th century.

As the PA and other facilitators of Israeli settlement colonialism continue to do today, these accounts use racist economic arguments as a method of distracting from the ideologically motivated dispossession and destruction that Palestinians have faced. and continue to face.

Developmentalism and dehumanization

Today, ideas of economic backwardness and powerlessness remain ubiquitous in the “development” narratives of those living under the supposed Palestinian Authority regime.

The presence of NGOs, for example, accountable to their mostly foreign donors, depoliticizes the plight of the Palestinian people, rendering them the victim of an objective circumstance rather than a people oppressed by politically and ideologically fabricated conditions.

The NGO sector has also grown in line with the Palestinian Authority’s growing commitment to neoliberalism. Fundraising cycles peddled by actors allergic to directly attacking political realities and the action of the oppressed reinforce racist ideas about pathological victimization and development, not so different from the colonial dehumanization that guided the missions. civilizational in the past.

Outside of the NGO realm, the PA also tried to promote a developmental agenda that sought to compromise resistance in exchange for funding.

An early example of this during Fayyad’s reign was the 2007 Palestine Reform and Development Plan (PRDP). According to Sami Tayeb, this plan and others were presented to donors with the aim of gaining the support of a Palestinian state “but only if the Palestinians could first achieve good governance, economic growth and security. “.

U.S.-sponsored proposals, such as Donald Trump’s 2020 peace plan, have built on this approach, attempting to further and permanently dispossess Palestinians of their land by offering a series of economic incentives that do not would only anchor the neoliberal state-building attempt more deeply. project.

By drafting proposals like the PRDP, the Palestinian Authority has strengthened its role as a sub-contractor to Israel’s colonial occupation. It seeks to prevent popular protests and resistance, which are not only seen as indicators of poor governance and poor security, but also as an obstacle to attracting the kind of large-scale investments required to execute development projects. which serve as a smoke screen for the deprivation of the right to vote. of the majority of Palestinians.

Returning to the violence with which the PA has faced Palestinian popular protests this year, it is clearer than ever that the PA’s undemocratic insistence on building an integrated neoliberal economy as a path to building state makes it so deeply disconnected from the demands of the people they claim to represent.

So much so that at a time of unprecedented support and visibility for the Palestinian cause, they can only be counted among the institutions that enact violence against the Palestinian people – allegedly in the name of good governance and economic rationalism that only the PA and other Palestinians elites understand.

The neoliberal and developmentalist logics that currently dominate the politics of Israel, the United States, world and regional powers, and the Palestinian Authority itself indicate that little has changed and that the normative ideas of economic rationalism continue to hold sway. ‘be used as a pretext for the perpetual colonial violence adopted. on the Palestinians.

Disclaimer: The views expressed by the authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions, views and editorial policies of TRT World.

We welcome all pitches and submissions to TRT World Opinion – please email them to opinion.editorial@trtworld.com

Source: TRT World

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/colonialism-dehumanization-and-neoliberal-state-building-in-palestine/feed/ 0
Prime Minister of Israel and Minister of Communications inaugurate fiber optic cable in Maalot-Tarshiha | JNS http://www.jewsformorality.org/prime-minister-of-israel-and-minister-of-communications-inaugurate-fiber-optic-cable-in-maalot-tarshiha-jns/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/prime-minister-of-israel-and-minister-of-communications-inaugurate-fiber-optic-cable-in-maalot-tarshiha-jns/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 13:04:24 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/prime-minister-of-israel-and-minister-of-communications-inaugurate-fiber-optic-cable-in-maalot-tarshiha-jns/ Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett and Communications Minister Yoaz Hendel on Tuesday dedicated the “fiber optic connection” to Ma’alot-Tarshiha, in the north of the country. “Today is a public holiday for the people of the region, the people of the Galilee as a whole and the outskirts,” Bennett said at the dedication ceremony, attended by […]]]>

Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett and Communications Minister Yoaz Hendel on Tuesday dedicated the “fiber optic connection” to Ma’alot-Tarshiha, in the north of the country.

“Today is a public holiday for the people of the region, the people of the Galilee as a whole and the outskirts,” Bennett said at the dedication ceremony, attended by the mayor of Ma’alot-Tarshiha Arkady Pomerantz, CEO of Bezeq David Mizrahi, Director General of the Ministry of Communications, Liran Avisar Ben-Horin and other officials.

“We are very interested in the outskirts,” Bennett continued. “It’s a national goal for us. The importance of connecting the periphery and the whole of the State of Israel with fiber optic cables for the economy is immense. This greatly increases the GDP, because everything is going to be faster and easier. More businesses and better education reduce highway congestion and air pollution, and encourage start-ups in all connected places. “

“As a former high tech CEO, I can tell you that the lack of internet infrastructure is simply preventing business creation,” he added. “If it’s slow, I can’t start a business.”

Calling the event the day “historic,” said Hendel, “fiber-optic cables are the most important engine of economic growth currently prevalent in Israel. The labor market increased by 3%, the GNP by 1.1%… and the most important is the reduction of [socioeconomic] gaps.

“The internet based on fiber optic cables is like the spread of the National Water Carrier, the availability of electricity in every home and a phone for every worker,” said Hendel.

“In any other country, they would have told us that connecting the north was not economical and that ‘there is no profitability’. However, we have a perspective called Zionism. This connection is not just a connection of cables, but of values. This is our path, a plumb line, a fiber, the development of the center alongside that of the Galilee and the Negev ”, he added.

An increasing number of Israeli cities are connected to fiber-optic cables as part of the communications infrastructure reform put forward by the communications ministry over the past year, the prime minister’s office said in a statement.

According to the plan, which was approved as part of the reform, remote towns and communities in the north and south of the country will be connected to fast internet, the statement said.

Post-Israel Prime Minister Minister of Communications Inaugurates Fiber Optic Cable to Maalot-Tarshiha appeared first on JNS.org.

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/prime-minister-of-israel-and-minister-of-communications-inaugurate-fiber-optic-cable-in-maalot-tarshiha-jns/feed/ 0
Opinion: the protest did more harm than good http://www.jewsformorality.org/opinion-the-protest-did-more-harm-than-good/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/opinion-the-protest-did-more-harm-than-good/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 09:56:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/opinion-the-protest-did-more-harm-than-good/ In his recent editorial, “Opinion: Principled Acts Take Courage,” Gerry Chidiac praised the actions of workers at the Port of Prince Rupert last month, who refused to unload cargo from a vessel owned by a company. Israeli company. In his recent editorial, “Opinion: Principled Acts Take Courage,” Gerry Chidiac praised the actions of workers at […]]]>

In his recent editorial, “Opinion: Principled Acts Take Courage,” Gerry Chidiac praised the actions of workers at the Port of Prince Rupert last month, who refused to unload cargo from a vessel owned by a company. Israeli company.

In his recent editorial, “Opinion: Principled Acts Take Courage,” Gerry Chidiac praised the actions of workers at the Port of Prince Rupert last month, who refused to unload cargo from a vessel owned by a company. Israeli company.

Chidiac writes that the actions were part of a larger movement called Block the Boat, which “seeks to draw attention to the injustices suffered by Palestinians by preventing Israeli ships, often carrying weapons, from docking in ports. of the whole world “.

It is deeply disappointing to see anyone, especially a high school teacher like Chidiac, promoting this “protest” movement. There are two reasons to oppose these protests, both for ideological and practical reasons.

First, while Chidiac compares these protesters to those defending Indigenous Canadians and black South Africans under apartheid, the comparison is ludicrous.

Despite repeated attempts to portray Israel as some sort of colonialist enterprise in the Middle East, anyone with any knowledge of the region knows full well that Israel did not appear out of nowhere in 1948. The Jewish people lived in its historic homeland for over 3,000 years, and continue to speak the same language and follow the same precepts as their ancestors thousands of years ago. It is not an opinion; it is a fact, supported by large amounts of archaeological and other data.

Although it was occupied for thousands of years by a parade of foreigners, including Romans, Greeks, Arabs, Turks and British, the Jewish people of Israel finally shook off the shackles of l occupation and Israel, the independent Jewish state, was reborn in 1948 Today, more than two million Israeli citizens are Arabs, who enjoy full civil rights in all areas, including government, where a party Israeli Arab is part of the governing coalition. As such, when Chidiac compares Israel to apartheid South Africa, it is more than just misinformation; it is defamatory.

It is contrary to the very concept of justice to support a cause that treats the Jews, a small, vulnerable group of people who have endured literally millennia of oppression and occupation in their own homeland, as illegal occupiers.

But there is more than just an ideological problem with these protests; there is also a practice. Blocking a ship owned by an Israeli company in northern British Columbia – or anywhere else, for that matter – has absolutely no material benefit for anyone, let alone the Palestinians. If it is true that economic and other pressures have had a material advantage in ending apartheid in South Africa, it is because black South Africans have not taken advantage of the country’s economy.

Conversely, in Israel, because the country’s Arab population is fully integrated into all sectors of the economy, attempting to harm the economy of the Jewish state – which luckily did not cause any harm – ultimately helps. nobody at all.

For example, the Israeli company SodaStream, which previously housed a factory in Judea and Samaria – commonly known as the West Bank – closed the factory in part because of international pressure in 2016. And while the boycotters of Israel celebrated the news , there was one. a large group that did not – the 500 Palestinians – and their families – who were employed at the factory, all of whom lost their jobs as a result.

When a protest movement creates no benefit – and in fact only harms – the very people it seeks to help, then it is time for protesters and their supporters like Chidiac, who should be wondering exactly what which pushes them to boycott a liberal, diverse and open society like Israel. It takes some privilege from those thousands of miles here in Canada to ask the Palestinians to suffer a boycott of Israel.

The boycott of Israel, whether by blocking Israeli ships in British Columbia, or any other action, is not only based on a blatant lie – and easily refuted, but it produces absolutely no benefit for the Palestinians either. The only solution to the conflict between the Palestinians and Israel is to deepen and broaden dialogue and cooperation, not to end it. There are two peoples living on a small strip of land in the Middle East, and neither are going anywhere. It is time for the workers protesting in Prince Rupert and their supporters to recognize this fact. Otherwise, their efforts will continue to be a total waste of time.

Robert walker

Toronto

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/opinion-the-protest-did-more-harm-than-good/feed/ 0
Sonoran Hebrew Cemetery Hosts Final Burial of Holocaust Survivor | New http://www.jewsformorality.org/sonoran-hebrew-cemetery-hosts-final-burial-of-holocaust-survivor-new/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/sonoran-hebrew-cemetery-hosts-final-burial-of-holocaust-survivor-new/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 13:00:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/sonoran-hebrew-cemetery-hosts-final-burial-of-holocaust-survivor-new/ The Sonoran Hebrew cemetery pioneer buried its last occupant to rest on the morning of July 8, a Holocaust survivor named Mine E. Grassetti who moved to Jamestown in the late 1980s and lived through most of her life. decades in Tuolumne County with her husband, David. Mine (pronounced Meena) Grassetti died July 4 in […]]]>

The Sonoran Hebrew cemetery pioneer buried its last occupant to rest on the morning of July 8, a Holocaust survivor named Mine E. Grassetti who moved to Jamestown in the late 1980s and lived through most of her life. decades in Tuolumne County with her husband, David.

Mine (pronounced Meena) Grassetti died July 4 in the Bay Area, where she moved in her later years, following a battle with cancer and other illnesses. She was 93 years old.

“She was the center of our lives, of our family, of our world,” said her daughter, Silvia Grassetti-Kruglikov, during a one-hour Jewish funeral ceremony attended by friends, family and friends. members of the Mother Lode Jewish community, a nonprofit organization of Mine Grassetti. organization with members from Amador, Calaveras, Tuolumne and Mariposa counties. “Our mother was a contemporary of Anne Frank, but one of the lucky ones.”

About 20 people gathered in the shade of the cypress trees and huddled near the gravestones carved in Hebrew, some of which date back over 160 years.

The mood turned from heartbreak to joy – in keeping with Jewish ritual and tradition – as her two sons, Richard and Daniel, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Silvia, commemorated her kindness, hospitality, intelligence and his outspokenness.

“It’s the end of an era,” said Elizabeth Grassetti.

“I was looking for her here. She was no longer there,” her son Richard Grassetti said after the ceremony. “But you could smell her here.

Mine Grassetti was buried next to her husband, David Grassetti, from Italy who also escaped the Nazis and died in 2005.

The family received a special dispensation to be buried there – the first since 1977 and probably the last – through family ties with the Commission for the Preservation of Pioneer Jewish Cemeteries and Monuments.

They lived for decades in the Table Mountain area outside of Jamestown.

“We are meeting today to accompany Mine on this most sacred journey,” said MLJC Rabbi Andra Greenwald, who led the ritual traditions for the tearing of clothing, memorial and burial, and read selected passages from the Torah, the Hebrew holy book.

The Grassetti plot is nestled at the end of an old motorable path cutting the cemetery in two, which once would have allowed a hearse to cross it to the other end. They are separated from some of the other occupants because they are not pioneers themselves.

“He had enormous respect for her and her for him,” said Dan Grassetti. “I feel incredibly privileged to be your son.”

According to an article in Friends and Neighbors magazine in its winter 2015-16 edition, Grassetti was born Mine Simmons to Jewish parents living in The Hague, the Netherlands. She was 12 when Nazi Germany invaded Holland in May 1940.

Mine Grassetti attributed his escape to the relative wealth of his family.

“We survived because we were able to get out,” she said.

But she lost her grandfather in Dachau, a Nazi concentration camp. Her best friend, Rose Jacobs, and the girl’s family were also killed and “missing” in the brutal inhumanity of the Holocaust.

Mine Grassetti’s father and a businessman named Felix Pais bribed Dutch Nazis to receive border passes to Belgium for the group, which included medics, his mother and older brother Erik.

The train broke down on the way to Brussels, and they missed their connection to Paris. Pais invented a ruse and told a Nazi commander that they were traveling to Spain to buy steel for the German war effort. Mine Grassetti said she didn’t know why, but the commander allowed it.

Surrounded by Nazis, they move towards Dunkirk, then towards Paris. From there they went to Spain, obtained permanent American visas in Bilbao, and sailed for New York.

Mine Grassetti met her husband while pursuing an architecture degree at MIT, but then gave up. The following year, she obtained a bachelor’s degree in real estate from Berkeley and later a law degree from Golden Gate University.

Articles from the Democratic Union of the late 1980s and early 1990s detail the achievements of Mine Grassetti on a professional level, but also in the art world with various oil paintings influenced by Goerges Rouault. and Marc Chagall.

In 1996, Mine Grassetti was a founding member of MLJC.

“These people are Holocaust survivors,” said MLJC chairman Rodger Orman of Murphys. “It was a suitable place.”

The Mother Lode never had a large Jewish population, but those who settled here during the Gold Rush and stayed through the modern era have always maintained close ties to their traditions and religious community.

Orman said there are around 70 Jewish families in Mother Lode today.

A 1970 CHISPA by Robert E. Levinson titled “The Importance of Sonoran Jewish Community” detailed a diaspora of European-born Jews to the Land of Gold fleeing the dark and growing specter of anti-Semitism.

Levinson was noted in the publication as a history professor at San Jose State College whose doctoral thesis was on “Jews in the California Gold Rush.”

Most of those who settled became merchants, “carrying out the same occupations that their ancestors carried out behind the walls of the ghetto: buying and selling food, clothing (both for the miners and for the inhabitants of the city) , general merchandise, tobacco, hardware and equipment for the dominant mining economy.

“They have certainly been a positive influence on the community and well respected,” said Sonoran historian Pat Perry.

They also came from various national backgrounds, Perry said, including Germany (or Prussia), France and Poland.

Within the community, they were characterized as leaders, Levinson noted. Even today, their names adorn emblematic architectural remains from the founding era of the colonized Mother Lode.

Emmanuel Linoberg’s last name entitles the street along which his historic brick building from 1856 still stands, and his name is inscribed on the upper level of the building.

Even then, the Jewish population was in the minority. Levinson refers to data from the 1860 federal census to enumerate 83 Jewish merchants, representing 3.6% of taxpayers and 0.51% of the population. They owned 6.67% of real and personal property and were assessed at 8.43% of total tax.

According to the article, in 1853 the Jews of Sonora organized the Hebrew Benevolent Society and established the Jewish cemetery. The perimeter wall was built around the same time, according to the article.

Some reports, including a 2007 Democratic Union article, indicated that the cemetery was founded earlier, in 1851.

The first person buried there was Hartwig Caro, 17, in 1853, according to the article, referring to a walking tour of the cemetery of the Commission for the Preservation of Pioneer Cemeteries and Monuments.

Despite a few instances of anti-Semitism locally, the Jewish community has rallied around ceremonies and parties, led by local Jewish leader Mayer Baer (who has a building on South Washington Street bearing his surname which is now occupied by Aloft Art Gallery).

Mayer Baer’s youngest son Julius, born in 1876 and died in 1972, was one of the cemetery’s last stewards, Perry said.

The city council approved the award to the Hebrew Benevolent Society of a deed for the cemetery at their meeting on March 19, 1962 (no actual deed existed so far). In 1969, the Commission accepted the cemetery of the Hebrew Benevolent Society of Sonora.

The Mother Lode Jewish community helped maintain the cemetery with an annual clean-up day hosted by MLJC volunteers and for a partial reconstruction of the exterior wall in 2017.

There are 44 plots visible in the cemetery.

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/sonoran-hebrew-cemetery-hosts-final-burial-of-holocaust-survivor-new/feed/ 0
There is still time to turn Rhode Island’s economy around. here’s how http://www.jewsformorality.org/there-is-still-time-to-turn-rhode-islands-economy-around-heres-how/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/there-is-still-time-to-turn-rhode-islands-economy-around-heres-how/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 19:57:39 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/there-is-still-time-to-turn-rhode-islands-economy-around-heres-how/ General Treasurer Seth MagazinerJulie brigidi This week, CNBC released its “Best States for Business” list and once again Rhode Island ranked in the bottom five nationally, well behind our neighboring states. This is important because in order for more Rhode Island families to join the middle class and achieve financial security and a high quality […]]]>
General Treasurer Seth MagazinerJulie brigidi

This week, CNBC released its “Best States for Business” list and once again Rhode Island ranked in the bottom five nationally, well behind our neighboring states. This is important because in order for more Rhode Island families to join the middle class and achieve financial security and a high quality of life, we need a vibrant local economy with well-paying jobs.

My grandfather Louis grew up in poverty, the son of Jewish immigrants from what is now Ukraine. Grandpa Louis didn’t have the chance to go to college, but he was used to numbers and got a job as an accountant at a local tomato canning company. With this work, he was able to make his way into the middle class, thus laying the foundation for the next three generations of my family. Stories like this are still possible, but only if we have a strong economy that offers a lot of good jobs.

The pace of Rhode Island’s economic recovery from the pandemic has not been strong enough. While media rankings like the CNBC List may be wrong, the underlying data is clear. In May, Rhode Island had 39,000 jobs below pre-pandemic levels, with the slowest job recovery in New England.

A weak economic recovery is hurting vulnerable Rhode Islanders the most. Our state continues to have the highest child poverty rate in the region, and we are the only state in New England with a rate above the national average.

The good news is that we still have a chance to turn around Rhode Island’s economy and provide a path to the middle class for thousands of Rhode Island families. But it will require forward-thinking and bold action.

The most important thing we can do to build a strong 21st century economy in Rhode Island is to invest in our people. The best jobs go where the talent is. It starts in our public school system, where we need to expand career technology programs that will give students the skills they need to be successful in the modern economy. We need to invest heavily in after-school learning programs to help students catch up during the pandemic. We should also expand the RI Promise program to make it easier for adult learners to return to school to get the training and credentials they need to advance their careers.

Rhode Island’s worst performing category in the CNBC rankings was Infrastructure. We must transform our state’s infrastructure to meet the needs of a modern economy. In addition to repairing roads, bridges and schools, we must bridge the digital divide and make businesses more competitive by expanding broadband access, embracing the future of clean energy by achieving the goal of fully renewable electricity by 2030, and increase the state’s supply of affordable housing products. These projects will result in thousands of initial construction jobs and improved long-term economic productivity.

We also need to make Rhode Island an easier place to start and run a business, whether it’s a Main Street restaurant or a high-tech startup. The grants and loans financed by the federal stimulus measures will not last forever, so the state government must re-dedicate itself to reducing bureaucracy, providing technical assistance, promoting l equity and carrying the nuts and bolts necessary to create a favorable climate for entrepreneurship.

The formula is simple. States like Connecticut and Massachusetts have higher growth, higher wages, and higher ratings on the CNBC list because their leaders have made smart investments in education, infrastructure, and entrepreneurship.

The Rhode Islanders deserve no less, and we have the right ingredients to make it happen. The state of the ocean is blessed with natural beauty, a vibrant culture, strong anchoring institutions, and a legacy of innovation. We can turn Rhode Island’s economy around and pave the way for the middle class, just like my grandfather’s, for thousands of Rhode Island families. But we must act with urgency and determination, and never settle for a position at the back of the pack.

Seth Magazine is the general treasurer of Rhode Island.

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/there-is-still-time-to-turn-rhode-islands-economy-around-heres-how/feed/ 0
Are Israel and Jordan ready to turn the page? | JNS http://www.jewsformorality.org/are-israel-and-jordan-ready-to-turn-the-page-jns/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/are-israel-and-jordan-ready-to-turn-the-page-jns/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 20:51:51 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/are-israel-and-jordan-ready-to-turn-the-page-jns/ Jordan’s King Abdullah II has often described his country as being stuck between “a rock and a hard place”, referring to war-torn Iraq and the Israel-controlled areas west of the Jordan River. And this has certainly been true for many years, but now that the United States is withdrawing its troops from Iraq and Israel […]]]>

Jordan’s King Abdullah II has often described his country as being stuck between “a rock and a hard place”, referring to war-torn Iraq and the Israel-controlled areas west of the Jordan River. And this has certainly been true for many years, but now that the United States is withdrawing its troops from Iraq and Israel has a new government, Jordan is facing altered realities along its borders.

Israeli Foreign Minister Yair Lapid last week met his Jordanian counterpart Ayman Safadi at the King Hussein Bridge, where they held ad new water and trade agreements. It came as news broke that Prime Minister Naftali Bennett met secretly with Abdullah in Amman the week before.

Efraim Inbar, president of the Jerusalem Institute for Strategy and Security, believes that while Jordan and Israel could see an improvement in relations with the installation of the new Israeli government, “it is unrealistic to expect to drastic changes, ”and the relationship“ will slowly improve, ”he said.

He notes that Israel and Jordan are linked by common enemies, such as the Palestinian national movement and fundamentalist terrorist groups in the East. The two countries are also linked by common interests, such as maintaining a secure and stable border and joining the 1994 Joint Peace Agreement.

For several years now, Jordan has been in the throes of crises ranging from the collapse of the economy to water scarcity, political instability and even an alleged coup attempt. The King appears to be caught in a Catch-22. If it acts to improve relations with Israel, then it alienates its Palestinian citizens, who make up 70 percent of the country’s population, and risks further political conflict. If it distances itself from Israel, it invites Iranian influence and risks compromising the security, economic and intelligence ties on which Jordan and Israel cooperate.

According to Inbar, Jordan provides Israel with strategic depth and Israel provides Jordan with an umbrella of security.

As such, while Jordan maintains a calm eastern front for Israel and cooperates on security issues, among others, Israel is helping Jordan in a number of ways, including maintaining stability and providing it with water.

Under the newly signed deal, Israel will provide Jordan with an additional 65 million cubic meters of water in 2021, according to Israel’s foreign ministry. The two countries also agreed to increase Jordanian exports to the Palestinian Authority from $ 160 million to $ 700 million.

Bilateral ties are not without problems

Opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday criticized Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett over the deal, saying Bennett “does not understand that when he gives him water, Abdullah is giving gas to Iran “.

But Bennett retaliated by saying, “You say that a leader of Israel sometimes has to face other nations in the interest of Israel. What is the Israeli interest for which MP Bibi Netanyahu destroyed our relationship with Jordan? “

Indeed, the bilateral relationship between Israel and Jordan is not without its problems.

Relations between Netanyahu and Abdullah have become frosty in recent years, especially under the Trump administration, when it comes to Israeli sovereignty over the Jordan Valley and Israel’s ties to the Arab Gulf states are crumbling. are improved with the agreements of Abraham.

As recently as March, Abdullah’s son Prince Hussein bin Abdullah canceled his planned visit to the Temple Mount due to a disagreement with Israeli authorities over his safety.

The next day, Jordan blocked Netanyahu from crossing his airspace on a historic visit to the United Arab Emirates. The visit would have been canceled Therefore.

And soon after, Jordan released a statement denouncing Jewish visits to the Temple Mount.

“We are fixing the relationship,” Bennett said.

The United States also appears ready to reset its relations with Jordan. Abdullah is due to visit the White House on July 19, which, according to the Biden administration, “will highlight the enduring and strategic partnership between the United States and Jordan.”

Inbar thinks Jordan is “playing a game, and we should learn to live with that game like we did with Egypt. We must be fully realistic about the limits of peace with the Arab countries. “

Iranian influence in Jordan is “shocking and radical change”

According to Edy Cohen, a researcher in inter-Arab relations at the BESA Center at Bar-Ilan University, Jordan seems to be turning away from the Gulf countries and turning to Iran, which is not a good sign for Israel.

Cohen says Abdullah seems to believe that opening the door to Iran will save Jordan from its troubles.

As proof, Cohen pointed out the June summit between Abdullah, Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa Kadhimi and Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi in Baghdad, where they announced a cooperation agreement on the transport of Iraqi oil by pipelines from Iraq through Jordan to Egypt, d ‘where it will be exported to Europe.

According to Cohen, the deal is just a fig leaf for Iranian influence. “Iraq is irrelevant because it is controlled by Iran, so we are talking about Iranian oil,” he said.

In his view, the fact that Abdullah brings Iranian influence to Jordan is “a radical and shocking change”.

He also noted that Abdullah visited the tomb of Jaffar Ibn Abu Taleb.

Taleb was Muhammad’s cousin, and his shrine is considered holy by the Shia faith. But because the Sunni faith disapproves of visiting burial grounds for worship, the practice is prohibited. King Abdullah’s visit is therefore seen as an opening to Iran, according to Cohen.

Like Inbar, Cohen also referred to the “game” Jordan is playing. “Maybe this is just a game to blackmail the Gulf countries,” he said. The Jordanians say, “If you don’t give me what I want, I will turn to the Iranians. “

“That’s what happened,” Cohen adds. “Let’s wait a month and see if this really happens. “

“Everything that happens in Jerusalem affects Jordan”

Moshe Albo, a Middle East expert at the IDC Institute for Policy and Strategy in Herzliya, told JNS that Jordan “understands that its stability is a strategic asset to Israel, and the last thing Israel wants is this. are Iranian militias or Palestinian terrorist organizations on the border. “

Albo says the main point of friction between Israel and Jordan is the Palestinian issue: “Everything that happens in Jerusalem affects Jordan. Abdullah’s power stems from his Islamic heritage as a Hashemite and Jerusalem is one of them.

Albo seems to agree with Inbar and Cohen that Jordan is “playing a game” in which it feels it must criticize Israel in order to appease public opinion. “This criticism does not always affect strategic ties,” he said, noting that the Israeli-Jordanian relationship is a complicated game of common interests, appeasing the Jordanian and Palestinian public, with Jordan presenting itself as the protector of the Palestinians and mosques on the Temple Mount.

Albo believes that the new Israeli government is “an opportunity to renew strategic ties” with Jordan. “It’s important that the leaders meet,” he said of Bennett’s recent secret meeting with Abdullah in Amman. “It is important for management to coordinate.

He says the water deal “is an act of goodwill” on Israel’s part and a message to Jordanians that Israel is ready to improve relations “because we have common interests and we want to see the stable kingdom ”.

The deal, he concludes, “is good for Jordan, good for the Palestinians and good for Israel.”

The post office Are Israel and Jordan ready to turn the page? appeared first on JNS.org.

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/are-israel-and-jordan-ready-to-turn-the-page-jns/feed/ 0
In order to overthrow government, Netanyahu seeks dysfunctional Knesset http://www.jewsformorality.org/in-order-to-overthrow-government-netanyahu-seeks-dysfunctional-knesset/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/in-order-to-overthrow-government-netanyahu-seeks-dysfunctional-knesset/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 07:35:34 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/in-order-to-overthrow-government-netanyahu-seeks-dysfunctional-knesset/ The Bennett-Lapid government was sworn in on June 13, now a month old. It is an unprecedented coalition: more ideologically diverse than ever, containing no less than eight factions and holding only the thinnest parliamentary majority at best. And it’s not always the best time. Even the smallest faction, as Ra’am has shown this week, […]]]>

The Bennett-Lapid government was sworn in on June 13, now a month old. It is an unprecedented coalition: more ideologically diverse than ever, containing no less than eight factions and holding only the thinnest parliamentary majority at best.

And it’s not always the best time. Even the smallest faction, as Ra’am has shown this week, can hold the coalition hostage. Any controversial topic, from citizenship rules for the unification of Palestinian families to cuts in family allowances for Haredim families, can cause the coalition to lose its majority or cause upheaval of anger among member factions.

And yet, a month after the start of the new term, the new coalition has proven to be stronger than expected. She has withstood the many crises that have crossed her path. There have been airstrikes in Gaza, fights for controversial laws, and countless attempts by the opposition to come up with legislation designed to drive wedge between the left and right flanks of the coalition. Yet the government held on all along.

Opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu is perhaps the most powerful glue that holds the coalition together. As long as he sits backstage in preparation for his return to power, parties like New Hope, Yamina, Yisrael Beytenu and Labor have a powerful incentive to stick together. There’s another glue, too: each of the parties in the new coalition is desperate to show meaningful dividends to their constituents before facing them again at the polls. This means having a say in the drafting of the state budget law that is due to be passed by November – which means keeping the coalition together until that budget law is passed.

The surprising resilience of the new government has led the opposition, under Netanyahu’s leadership, to pursue a different strategy to topple it. The plan is simple, and over the past few days it has crystallized into a simple plan of action: disrupt everything, every moment.

The past month has seen a grueling war of procedural attrition in the Knesset whose aim was not to overthrow the government directly – the opposition does not have the votes to actually replace the coalition – but to literally render it unable to rule the country. The break-up strategy was very successful. The government has managed to overcome the obstacles of major political crises, but it has struggled and stumbled when it comes to governing and legislating on a daily basis.

Prime Minister Naftali Bennett leads a cabinet meeting at the Prime Minister’s Office in Jerusalem on July 11, 2021 (Marc Israel Sellem / Pool / Flash90)

The opposition tried to delay things at every turn and using all of the procedural tricks in the book. Netanyahu himself has been seen in recent days walking the halls of the Knesset with a copy of the statutes of parliament in his hands.

Likud-led opposition parties refused to negotiate the formation of Knesset committees, refused to debate the budget law, refused to pass even bills they supported, such as the Likud vote of the government law on family reunification on the grounds that granting the government any success at all amounted to a de facto “vote of confidence”.

“You are not just bitter,” frustrated Prime Minister Naftali Bennett slammed the opposition in remarks at the Knesset plenum on Monday, “you are anarchists, who want to burn the whole country just to harm the coalition “.

Resistance

On Monday, after a month of delays and relentless opposition, the Knesset Arrangements Committee finally succeeded in calling for a vote establishing vital Knesset standing committees, in particular the committees on the economy, the health, welfare and education.

Illustration: Members of the Knesset Arrangements Committee vote against tabling the controversial family reunification bill before the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee, July 5, 2021 (Screen capture / channel by the Knesset)

The vote counted. The Delta variant of COVID brought the pandemic back to Israeli shores, but no Knesset health committee was there to oversee or challenge the government’s response. Special unemployment benefits instituted last year run out in the coming weeks, but no welfare committee has met to determine whether the government’s decision to end benefits is appropriate while unemployment remains well above pre-pandemic levels.

Dozens of major reforms, most widely supported across the political spectrum, have been delayed for nearly three years due to the political stalemate in the last four elections. Without functional committees, they cannot move forward. Reform to streamline Israel’s Byzantine import rules, which are a major cause of the country’s high cost of living, cannot move forward without the Economy Committee. An offer by lawmakers to reconsider the terms of natural gas deals with energy companies cannot either, nor public transport reforms, including a rush hour tax to enter Tel Aviv’s metropolitan core.

New Education Minister Yifat Shasha-Biton, who holds a doctorate in education, foresees sweeping changes in the education system, including fewer but longer school days each week, shorter school vacations ( the age-old scourge of working parents), and delegating more control over the program of the ministry’s headquarters in Jerusalem to school principals. But no education committee existed until Monday to debate the wisdom of these reforms or advance the legislation necessary for their implementation.

The feuds that virtually froze the daily work of Israel’s parliament over the past month have left the affairs of the people unattended. And the opposition is impatient for this situation to continue.

Monday’s vote ultimately forming these committees rose to 17-13, entirely along party lines. A plenary vote later approving committee assignments went 60 to naught Monday night; all the opposition was absent in protest.

Prime Minister Naftali Bennett speaks during a plenary session in the Knesset on July 12, 2021. (Olivier Fitoussi / Flash90)

Likud and its opposition allies have good reason to be unhappy with the new committees. Breaking with parliamentary tradition, the coalition has established comfortable majorities in all key committees, well beyond the relative strength of the coalition in the Knesset.

But as coalition sources pointed out on Monday, it was the opposition that refused to negotiate the seat allocation last month – in a transparent attempt to delay the formation of any committee.

On Monday, the opposition redoubled its efforts. The leaders of the opposition parties announced that they would not assign members to the new committees and that they would even boycott plenary sessions with foreign leaders. The plan is simple: refuse to conduct ordinary parliamentary business until the coalition falls.

“There is no dialogue with the opposition,” a coalition deputy told Maariv media on Monday. “It seems they want to fight and are not interested in any deal with us.”

The Minister of Health Nitzan Horowitz, leader of the Meretz party, was quick to castigate the behavior of the opposition: “We have spent many years in the opposition and have never called the government illegitimate nor disrupted the formation of committees. The Knesset must get to work.

Opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu during a plenary session in the Knesset on July 12, 2021 (Olivier Fitoussi / Flash90)

Even in the opposition, the new policy caused nausea. “This is our step for the media,” complained an opposition MP of the decision not to staff committees, “and this is where most of the work is done. “

Hurry up

It is no coincidence that the opposition is now focusing on postponing legislative work. If the government cannot be brought down by its internal ideological divisions, then maybe failure to pass the budget will do.

With the committees now formed, the first and most important of the Knesset’s duties is to successfully pass a state budget for the first time since March 2018. And with a month already lost due to the disruption of the opposition, it will not be easy.

There are just over three weeks left before the Knesset leaves its summer recess on August 6 and returns for its winter session in early October. Knesset Speaker Mickey Levy has given permission for committees to meet during the holidays, but September coincides with the intensive Jewish holiday schedule, making most of the month unavailable for parliamentary business. There will be barely half a dozen working days of plenum between late August and early October.

A plenary session in the Knesset, July 6, 2021 (Yonatan Sindel / Flash90)

The new budget will likely hit the cabinet table in early August. If it is approved, it must then pass a first vote in plenary session a few days later, sending its various parts to the competent committees for debate and revision. The Knesset will then go to the recess. When the Knesset returns, its committees will have barely eight weeks to debate and complete the drafting of the comprehensive budget bill, including the accompanying budget bills containing the many institutional and policy reforms of the budget, and then send the huge legislative package back to plenary for the second and third votes that enact it.

The coalition is on schedule for the moment. But it’s a desperately tight schedule for such complex legislation, which will include reforms stalled by a nearly three-year stalemate and budget adjustments after two years of interim spending bills.

The government may have been resilient to the usual series of political crises, but it will fall if it does not pass this budget which, under Israel’s basic laws, would automatically call a snap election. The opposition’s delaying tactics have already cost the coalition a precious month of work. If the coalition does not improve its game on parliamentary soil, it will lose the greatest war for its survival through sheer procedural attrition.

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/in-order-to-overthrow-government-netanyahu-seeks-dysfunctional-knesset/feed/ 0
Marjorie Taylor Greene and the Republican Anti-History http://www.jewsformorality.org/marjorie-taylor-greene-and-the-republican-anti-history/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/marjorie-taylor-greene-and-the-republican-anti-history/#respond Sat, 10 Jul 2021 11:00:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/marjorie-taylor-greene-and-the-republican-anti-history/ In June, Marjorie Taylor Greene visited the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington. The visit was, in its own right, revealing. Earlier in the spring, the Georgian member of the US House compared Food City, a grocery store chain that identified vaccinated employees on their badges, to the Nazis, who forced Jews to wear Stars […]]]>

In June, Marjorie Taylor Greene visited the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington. The visit was, in its own right, revealing. Earlier in the spring, the Georgian member of the US House compared Food City, a grocery store chain that identified vaccinated employees on their badges, to the Nazis, who forced Jews to wear Stars of David. A few days later, she compared Democrats to the Nazis.

Now she was contrite. “When you make a mistake you should own it. I made a mistake, and it’s been really bothering me for a few weeks now, so I really want to own it,” she said. mentionned. “The Holocaust, there is nothing like it.”

The lesson ended in less than a month. When President Joe Biden announced his intention to send public health officials door-to-door to encourage people to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, Greene tweeted: “People have a choice, they don’t need your brown medical shirts to show up at their doorstep to order vaccinations.”

Another visit to the museum would probably be in vain. For Greene and other members of the Trump wing of the Republican Party, anti-history has become a shibboleth. They deposit historical references and facts in political debates, but without regard to context, logic or proportionality. Their villains include Adolf Hitler, but also Mao Zedong and Joseph McCarthy; the Holocaust was bad, but also the Jewish people control the weather. The pose is more than just the historical illiteracy that is rampant among American politicians. In this faction of the GOP, members willfully ignore history, which they view in purely instrumental terms as a bludgeon to wield even if they don’t bother to understand it.

As usual, Donald Trump himself led the way. In 2018, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly had to give the then president a capsule lesson on inter-war history and which countries were on which side. of the two world wars, from a new book of the Wall Street newspaper journalist Michael C. Bender. “Well, Hitler did a lot of good things,” Trump reportedly replied, citing the improvement in the German economy in the 1930s. (Trump denies it.) “You can never say anything in favor of Adolf Hitler “Kelly replied. ” You can not. He was right, although he didn’t see it as a reason to stop right now.

Ignorance of Trump’s story is well established. During the first fortnight of his presidency, he cited Frederick Douglass as “an example of someone who did an incredible job and is increasingly recognized, I notice”, showing no awareness of who Douglass was. . Weeks later, Trump mentioned Abraham Lincoln at a dinner party. “Great president. Most people don’t even know he was a Republican ”, he said. “Does anyone know? A lot of people don’t know. Who? Then, in May 2017, Trump thought absurdly that if Andrew Jackson had lived later, the Civil War could have been avoided.

predictable, many of the most egregious examples of the anti-historical approach involve Hitler. Another notable case occurred in Washington state, where a Republican state lawmaker wore a Star of David to an event to protest against the vaccination warrants. (“It’s an echo of history. In the current context, we are all Jews,” he wrote on Facebook, before apologizing later.) American conservatives have often argued that the Nazis were in fact leftists, noting that the full name of the party included the words National Socialist, but anti-historians have moved from this sly fallacy to a reflexive recourse to the Holocaust, however inappropriate or misguided, in almost every debate.

Hitler’s contradictory views on the part of anti-historians can resemble ideological confusion. But they actually show how the use of the past by anti-historians is purely opportunistic. These politicians do not interpret history to support their views, but choose isolated and misunderstood examples to match whatever argument they make.

The anti-history is not limited to particular views of Hitler. Earlier this week, former Trump spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany told Fox News viewers, “We know that most of our ancestors, all of our main founding fathers, were against slavery, recognized its evils.” (Several founders expressed their ambivalence about slavery while enslaving people, but that’s not what McEnany said.) Rep. Madison Cawthorn from North Carolina likes to quote American history and is often wrong , creating his own anti-history cannon.

Many legitimate disputes exist over the facts of history and its interpretation: Consider some – but perhaps not most – of the debate over The New York Times Magazine‘s 1619 Project. Politicians can also make questionable or mistaken statements about history without participating in anti-history.

Conspiracy thinking, another hallmark of Trumpism, is anti-history’s natural partner. Each extracts isolated facts or claims from their appropriate context, fabricates new contexts for them without regard to reality, and transforms them into partisan weapons. That Greene (found espousing bizarre anti-Semitic theories while not comparing anything she doesn’t like to the Holocaust) and Trump are the main proponents of anti-history and conspiracy thought is no coincidence.

In 1955, the founding father of a new conservative trend, William F. Buckley, promised than his magazine, National exam, “would be throughout history, shouting Stop”. Rising Trumpist tension in the conservative movement rises through the slop, shouting “History! “

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/marjorie-taylor-greene-and-the-republican-anti-history/feed/ 0
Biden administration must mobilize to end anti-Semitism http://www.jewsformorality.org/biden-administration-must-mobilize-to-end-anti-semitism/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/biden-administration-must-mobilize-to-end-anti-semitism/#respond Thu, 08 Jul 2021 23:04:01 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/biden-administration-must-mobilize-to-end-anti-semitism/ (July 8, 2021 / JNS) The Jewish community and its supporters will come to Washington, DC on July 11 to participate in the “No Fear” rally against anti-Semitism. In the footsteps of the US Capitol, now is the time to claim our civil and human rights in the fight against anti-Semitism. It will be a […]]]>

The Jewish community and its supporters will come to Washington, DC on July 11 to participate in the “No Fear” rally against anti-Semitism. In the footsteps of the US Capitol, now is the time to claim our civil and human rights in the fight against anti-Semitism.

It will be a rare time for Jews to have the national and world stage, and we must use this opportunity wisely. The rally must go beyond awareness raising; this is our opportunity to demand that the Biden administration tackle and stop the mass anti-Semitism that is spreading rapidly and infects all areas of our lives – in our workplaces, schools, colleges, places of worship , social media, in retail and entertainment establishments, on the streets and even in vacation destinations. As is often said, anti-Semitism is the oldest and most tolerated form of racism in the world.

The Jewish community needs US President Joe Biden to bring anti-Semitism out of the shadows and gain public attention. Last May, Biden took an important first step in renouncing anti-Semitism nationwide. But it didn’t go far enough. His statement failed to recognize its pervasive and insidious nature. Blatant discrimination and intolerance against Jews has skyrocketed, and civil rights violations have been a problem for years at North American colleges. His statement did not recognize the rise in hatred until May 2021, following the conflict between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.

The role of the federal government is to protect our human and civil rights. I expect the Republican and Democratic parties to adhere to these principles. I expect Biden to take advantage of his leadership and not only speak out against the anti-Semitism of the right, but also of the left and the center. We need to hold the federal government accountable and demand action.

Our biggest challenge as a Jewish community is that anti-Semitism has evolved over the past decades. It looks and feels different. The 21st century reflects a new era of Jewish hatred that the government must recognize and crush clearly and directly. Classical and contemporary forms of anti-Semitism are not well understood and, therefore, unrecognized.

Last month at The hill, Kenneth Marcus, founder and president of the Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights under the Law and former Assistant Secretary of Education for Civil Rights, called for a decree to combat anti-Semitism in the country and abroad. Everything it lists is important, including the assignment of senior administration officials to this effort to ensure interagency coordination, and that it “should include proactive enforcement initiatives to combat anti-Semitism on the Internet. university campuses and in public schools “. Of course, the Jewish community is still waiting for the president to fill the vacant ambassadorial post of the Special Envoy for Anti-Semitism.

Beyond what Marcus describes, I detail four actions the administration should take to ensure that the fight against anti-Semitism is effective.

First. A critical step is for the Biden to publicly recognize and build on the 2016 International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) working definition of anti-Semitism and the examples provided through its efforts related to anti-Semitism.

The United States, as a member of the IHRA, adopted this definition in the last year of the Obama administration, along with 30 other nations, many of which were directly involved in the Holocaust or were complicit in apathy. or denying the Jews refuge. While not legally binding, it sets the international standard for understanding what anti-Semitism is and provides institutions and organizations, such as government and educational agencies, with an indispensable official resource.

More importantly, however, the administration must pay close attention and explicitly identify the 11 examples of contemporary IHRA anti-Semitism, coupled with explanations of anti-Semitic discrimination and criminal acts. (I invite you to see them again hereThe IHRA list is powerful precisely because it directly recognizes the vast majority of anti-Semitic activity facing Jews in the United States, both from the right, the left and the mainstream.

Second. The administration cannot let foreign affairs dictate silence on anti-Semitism, especially from the left. As the May peak illustrates, anti-Israel sentiment is closely linked to anti-Semitic rhetoric and hateful actions.

During his campaign, Biden acknowledged that the BDS movement “singles out Israel and too often veers into anti-Semitism” and that it “would fight other efforts to delegitimize Israel on the world stage.” This is consistent with one of the examples of the IHRA which states: “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination, for example, by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist enterprise” is anti-Semite.

The Biden administration must declare that Israel’s existence as a sovereign nation is non-negotiable. It is a prosperous democratic nation with a strong and innovative economy, in which its citizens enjoy civil protections and human rights under the law. It is the only democracy in the Middle East. Allowing continued questioning of Israel’s right to exist undermines its very existence. And unfortunately, it fuels contemporary anti-Semitism.

The third. We need the State Department envoy for anti-Semitism in place immediately. We need an official and an empowered voice that represents the US government to speak out against anti-Semitism wherever it appears and lead the effort to combat it.

Anti-Semitism requires distinct recognition, programs, policies and leadership at the federal national and international levels. International and national data confirm this. The rapid escalation of global anti-Semitism through physical violence, discrimination in the workplace and at school, blatant misinterpretations in mainstream media coverage and through the sheer volume of publications and Hateful comments on social media warrants immediate action.

Fourth. Biden’s national efforts must not treat anti-Semitism and Holocaust memory as a uniquely Jewish issue. We cannot fight against all hatred and discrimination without simultaneously fighting against anti-Semitism; they are inextricably linked.

All efforts related to hatred, discrimination and civil rights must include and address the role of anti-Semitism in policies, accountability, and awareness and prevention efforts among all stakeholders.

Biden announced early in his administration that the Home Policy Council (DPC) would be looking at racial justice and fairness. DPC director Susan Rice acknowledged that her office would also focus on outreach and efforts on behalf of ethnic and religious minorities, of which Jews are both.

In the United States alone, the statistics are alarming. The ADL reports that 60% of American Jews witnessed an anti-Semitic case in May, and that rates of harassment and incidents against Jews have doubled in the past year. And that’s after more than 30 years of FBI data showing that Jews and Jewish institutions are the main victims of religious hatred. And the reality is that every type of anti-Semitism is underestimated.

And since 2015, there have been 3,500 documented antisemitic incidents at U.S. colleges and universities, according to the Amcha Initiative, a nonprofit dedicated to monitoring and combating antisemitism in higher education institutions. Americans. Under the guise of free speech and academic freedom, universities across the country allow their faculty and students to create hostile learning environments for Jews.

Agencies nationwide, such as education, homeland security, labor, justice (which includes the FBI), health and social services, and more, need to understand what anti-Semitism looks like. Agencies charged with protecting civil rights and prosecuting discrimination and hate crimes must understand the complexities of modern anti-Semitism; otherwise, we will not progress.

The administration places a strong emphasis on “public engagement,” what it sounds like: interacting with stakeholders and having meaningful, ongoing conversations on policy issues. When it comes to anti-Semitism, the administration and the executive must communicate with local and state agencies, in addition to employers, schools and universities, and then get involved. The message should include that anti-Semitism will not be tolerated and refer to the IHRA definition.

The administration should educate and empower parents, students, schools, employees, and civic and business leaders to identify and report all forms of hatred, which can even take the form of harassment or bullying.

At the same time, the administration needs to focus on prevention through tangible products, events and resources that families, employers, law enforcement, schools and universities can tap into, such as counseling and fact sheets, informative social media posts and even old-fashioned webinars with national experts. The federal government must help leaders in all sectors understand how to create inclusive and welcoming environments for all.

Ida R. Eblinger Kelley is a retired federal education and health care communications and outreach executive in Washington, DC. Later she served as Deputy Director of the Nixon Presidential Library in County of Orange, California, where she currently resides. As a child of Cuban Jewish immigrants, she dedicated her academic and professional career to empowering disenfranchised people.

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/biden-administration-must-mobilize-to-end-anti-semitism/feed/ 0
Jordan and Israel agree to water deal; more trade in the West Bank | Business and Economy News http://www.jewsformorality.org/jordan-and-israel-agree-to-water-deal-more-trade-in-the-west-bank-business-and-economy-news/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/jordan-and-israel-agree-to-water-deal-more-trade-in-the-west-bank-business-and-economy-news/#respond Thu, 08 Jul 2021 18:59:23 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/jordan-and-israel-agree-to-water-deal-more-trade-in-the-west-bank-business-and-economy-news/ Israel and Jordan on Thursday reached a deal for the Jewish state to sell an unprecedented amount of water to the kingdom, while dramatically increasing Jordanian exports to Palestinians in the occupied West Bank. The agreements, reached at a meeting between their foreign ministers, signaled an improvement in relations with Israel’s new government after years […]]]>

Israel and Jordan on Thursday reached a deal for the Jewish state to sell an unprecedented amount of water to the kingdom, while dramatically increasing Jordanian exports to Palestinians in the occupied West Bank.

The agreements, reached at a meeting between their foreign ministers, signaled an improvement in relations with Israel’s new government after years of strained relations under former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Cooperation on water resources has been a central issue between Israel and Jordan since a 1994 peace accord, but relations between neighbors have deteriorated in recent years.

In a meeting held just inside the Jordanian border, Israeli Foreign Minister Yair Lapid and his counterpart Ayman Safadi approved Israel’s sale of 50 million cubic meters of water to its neighbor.

An Israeli official said this would effectively double the supply for the year – measured between May 2021 and May 2022 – because around 50 million cubic meters were already sold or given to Jordan. A Jordanian official said Israel is giving the kingdom 30 million cubic meters per year as part of its 1994 peace treaty.

Statements from both governments confirmed the sale and indicated that final details of the transaction would be finalized in the coming days.

Gidon Bromberg, Israeli director of EcoPeace Middle East, a leading organization on regional water cooperation that operates in Israel, the West Bank and Jordan – described the sale of water as “the greatest quantity ever. sold between the two countries ”.

“[It] is a real milestone, ”said Bromberg.

“It represents an understanding of mutual interests and how countries in the region must work together if we are to survive the enormous challenges to water and national security presented by the climate crisis.”

Jordan is one of the poorest water countries in the world and experts say the country, home to 10 million people, is struggling with one of the most severe droughts in its history.

Israel, which also faces water pressures, is a world leader in desalination.

Palestinian trade

Regarding Palestinian trade, both sides have confirmed that the ceiling for Jordan’s potential exports to the West Bank, a territory occupied by Israel since 1967, will drop from around $ 160 million to $ 700 million per year.

Jordan’s Supreme Envoy said in a statement that he and Lapid also discussed a path to “just and comprehensive peace” between Israel and the Palestinians.

“The Kingdom of Jordan is an important neighbor and partner,” said Lapid. “We will expand economic cooperation for the good of both countries. “

Jordan said technical teams will work out details in the coming days and discussions on the implementation of the export cap will take place between Israeli, Jordanian and Palestinian officials.

Amman tour

Meanwhile, Israeli media reported on Thursday that Prime Minister Naftali Bennett secretly visited Jordan last week and met King Abdullah II at his Amman palace.

It would be the first meeting between the king and an Israeli prime minister in more than five years.

Palestinian sources said PA President Mahmoud Abbas met King Abdullah after his meeting with Bennett, Haaretz reported.

Bilateral relations have grown strained under Netanyahu, who was banned from using Jordanian airspace earlier this year, thwarting what was supposed to be his very first trip to the United Arab Emirates.

Netanyahu was replaced last month by Bennett, whose coalition has made warming relations with Jordan a foreign policy priority.

Israel and Jordan made peace in 1994 and maintain close security ties, but relations have been strained in recent years due to Palestinian tensions within the compound of Al-Aqsa Mosque, Israel’s expansion of Jewish settlements on lands won over by war and the lack of any progress in the long moribund peace process.

Jordan and the Palestinians were fiercely opposed to the Trump administration’s Middle East plan, which would have allowed Israel to annex up to a third of the occupied West Bank. Israel captured East Jerusalem and the West Bank from Jordan in the 1967 war, territories the Palestinians want to be part of their future state.

The announcements came days before Jordan’s King Abdullah II visited the White House. The Biden administration called on all parties to take steps that could help lay the groundwork for a resumption of possible peace talks.

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/jordan-and-israel-agree-to-water-deal-more-trade-in-the-west-bank-business-and-economy-news/feed/ 0