Ethical literature – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ Sun, 18 Jul 2021 23:49:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.jewsformorality.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T151402.937-150x150.png Ethical literature – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ 32 32 Church Bridge Project Focus Group Findings: African American Perspectives of Weight Management Programs to Improve Nutrition and Physical Activity Behaviors | BMC Nutrition http://www.jewsformorality.org/church-bridge-project-focus-group-findings-african-american-perspectives-of-weight-management-programs-to-improve-nutrition-and-physical-activity-behaviors-bmc-nutrition/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/church-bridge-project-focus-group-findings-african-american-perspectives-of-weight-management-programs-to-improve-nutrition-and-physical-activity-behaviors-bmc-nutrition/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 23:43:38 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/church-bridge-project-focus-group-findings-african-american-perspectives-of-weight-management-programs-to-improve-nutrition-and-physical-activity-behaviors-bmc-nutrition/ This study examined perceptions about a faith-based weight management program that were helpful in identifying factors related to the design and implementation of the weight management intervention. The themes gleaned from the focus groups suggested that the participants in the intervention, the “graduates”, had a positive perception of the program. However, the use of technology […]]]>

This study examined perceptions about a faith-based weight management program that were helpful in identifying factors related to the design and implementation of the weight management intervention. The themes gleaned from the focus groups suggested that the participants in the intervention, the “graduates”, had a positive perception of the program. However, the use of technology appeared to be both a barrier and a facilitator for the success of the program. Competing priorities were discussed as barriers to participation in the weight management program for “graduates” and “non-participants”. Another theme was the negative connotation associated with the terminology “weight management program”. Suggestions included wording the wording as a nutrition and physical activity program. Social support and personal health have also been identified as key factors for the success of a weight management program.

The results of the focus groups indicate that careful considerations are needed when integrating technology into health intervention research. Mobile technology was seen as a way to facilitate motivation, participation in sessions and social support; however, a predominant theme among the “graduates” was that the mobile app’s food diary feature was difficult to use. A review of articles on dietary assessment using cellphones found that six of the seven included studies reviewed had high participant satisfaction with using cellphones for dietary assessment. [21]. The results of two additional studies also support general acceptance of mobile food recording methods among adults, including a community sample. [22, 23]. Previous research found that higher user satisfaction was associated with more accurate food intake reporting [24]; however, it was not related to participants’ perceived burden of remembering and recording food intake [23]. In addition, Krebs and Duncan [25] found that 44.5% of users surveyed stopped using a health-related app because it took too long to enter data. Thus, although the use of mobile apps for dietary assessment may be seen as a satisfactory mode of data collection for participants, it may not reduce the perceived burden of data collection, which has implications. on data integrity.

While mobile technology does not reduce the burden of data collection, supplementing behavioral interventions with technology can help maintain program intensity / contact and provide individualized support to participants without increasing participant burden. . One review indicated that technology-based weight loss interventions induced positive weight-related outcomes, improved social support and opportunities for self-monitoring, and improved program adherence. [26]. Our previous research as well as the conclusions of another study [27] The examination of virtual health-related communities supports the hypothesis that technology, by increasing convenience and access, can improve perceived support, thereby improving outcomes. As we have found, simple strategies such as providing participants with live access to sessions when they cannot physically attend can increase program support and keep participants engaged in the program. Since previous church-based intervention research studies have concluded that greater program participation positively influences health outcomes [6, 7], an important theme was that competing priorities are major barriers to participation in the program by young, middle-aged African American adults. More research is needed to determine with the population what strategies might help them overcome barriers to participating in the program.

Various types of social support (general social and instrumental support, religious and religious) have been associated with improved eating behaviors and physical activity in minority and rural communities [8, 9] and is crucial to engage the population in healthy behaviors [10]. Preliminary work also identified family support to be associated with weight loss intentions among an African American population. A similar theme found in this study was that the “church family” was a motivator for program participants. However, research examining the potentially beneficial health effects of perceived church social support and group interventions is minimal.

An additional theme, disease management and prevention goals were identified as motivators for participation in a weight management program. It was interesting to note that although the “non-participants” expressed a common theme about the importance of participating in weight management programs for health and longevity, they were not sufficiently motivated to actually participate in the program. program when offered. Relevant themes from focus group data and previous literature support the importance of shifting the obesity conversation from bodily ideals to health in a culturally appropriate way. [12]. The challenges associated with this goal include perceptions among African Americans that obesity per se is not an indicator of poor health. [28], health is independent of obesity status [29], and “bigger is healthier” [30]. Other African-American focus group participants also viewed body mass index negatively. [31] which corroborates our results on the preference of African Americans to define “weight management interventions” as “nutrition and physical activity interventions” to improve the determinants of a healthy lifestyle and decrease the weight. emphasis on weight. This suggestion is supported by the currently published concepts that individuals should focus on their health and not achieve a certain ideal body weight. [31].

Limits and strengths

In alignment with the four principles of reliability of qualitative survey [16], our results were credible, transferable, reliable and ultimately confirmable. Credibility relates to the quality of the fit between the ideas of the participants and the interpretation of these ideas by the researchers. We used a multi-step approach that included triangulating the research, or multiple observers, at different steps to define and confirm the themes that represent the data and reduce potential bias. Code and theme development was also documented at each step and reviewed by several researchers as the themes were refined and finalized. Transferability refers to the generalization of knowledge acquired through research. This study highlights the importance of approaching weight management from a disease prevention and preventive health perspective. In addition, faith-based programs, compared to traditional medical settings, may be advantageously provided with social support to facilitate diet, physical activity, and other health behavior change goals. Although our results are limited to a rural African American population in Mississippi and a small sample, these results are not completely isolated in the literature and may have implications for other populations, particularly in the Great South. We also conducted only one focus group for each type of group. Our research staff felt that they had saturated the pool of potential participants with recruitment efforts and did not believe that additional recruitment would result in enough participants for an additional focus group. Our sample uniquely represents a predominantly young to middle-aged African American population, who will be a critical target for health and behavior education programs to move beyond disease management towards reduction. disease risk and ultimately health disparities.

Finally, our research is both reliable and verifiable. Reliability refers to the research process in that it is clear and repeatable. Our steps are documented and follow best practice guidelines for qualitative investigation. Confirmability requires the demonstration of how the conclusions were drawn, which is achieved when credibility, portability and reliability are achieved. Our study describes a clear qualitative process for how themes were derived with multiple checkpoints and the results have clear implications for weight management in a specific population, which may have implications and guide research in other populations.


Source link

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/church-bridge-project-focus-group-findings-african-american-perspectives-of-weight-management-programs-to-improve-nutrition-and-physical-activity-behaviors-bmc-nutrition/feed/ 0
Measuring the cost of racial abuse in football http://www.jewsformorality.org/measuring-the-cost-of-racial-abuse-in-football/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/measuring-the-cost-of-racial-abuse-in-football/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 20:28:41 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/measuring-the-cost-of-racial-abuse-in-football/ Like many football fans around the world, Paolo Falco, a labor economist at the University of Copenhagen, was delighted with the outcome of the European Championship final last Sunday, which saw Italy beat England. in a decisive penalty shootout. And he was appalled in equal measure at the consequences. In the hours following the match, […]]]>

Like many football fans around the world, Paolo Falco, a labor economist at the University of Copenhagen, was delighted with the outcome of the European Championship final last Sunday, which saw Italy beat England. in a decisive penalty shootout. And he was appalled in equal measure at the consequences.

In the hours following the match, the three English players, all black, who missed their shots on goal were beset with racial abuse on social media. The abuse sparked the indignation of Prince William and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, and rekindled an all-too-familiar aphorism: “When you win, you are English; when you lose, you are black.

In recent years, UEFA, the governing body of European football, has made efforts to combat racism against its players, both online and in stadiums. But the behavior persists; in Italy and elsewhere, world-class players of color have been subjected to racist chants and epithets, and even bananas thrown onto the pitch. “I have been through all kinds of terrible things that have been said, cursed and shouted at players,” said Dr Falco, who closely follows Serie A, the best Italian league.

In December, he and two colleagues – Mauro Caselli and Gianpiero Mattera, economists at the University of Trento, Italy, and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development in Paris, respectively – published one of the first studies seeking to measure the impact of stadium abuse on the game. Their discussion paper, which is expected to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, compared the performance of around 500 Serie A players during the first half from the 2019-2020 season of the main Italian league league – before the Covid-19 pandemic, when stadiums were full and noisy – until the second half, when “ghost games” were played in empty stadiums .

Their results were striking: a subgroup of players, and only one, performed significantly better in the absence of a crowd. “We find that players in Africa, who are most often the target of racial harassment, experience significant improvement in their performance when supporters are no longer at the stadium,” the authors wrote.

Dr Falco spoke by phone from Copenhagen on Thursday. The following conversation has been edited for brevity and clarity.

What inspired your study?

I was watching a football game after the lockdown started and was struck by the difference I experienced even on TV just not hearing all the noises and chants that usually happen in background of a football match. .

I’m from Naples and the football fans in Naples are really loud. In this kind of stadium, we see emotions expressing themselves at best and at worst. And you can’t help but feel that it is having an impact on what is happening on the pitch in the stadium.

I started to wonder: Would this make a difference for all players in the same way? Who are the players who will suffer more or less, or win more or less, to have or not the pressure of the supporters?

What was your working hypothesis?

That the players targeted because of their color will perform better when the pressure is removed, regardless of the general pressure of playing in a stadium, which is the same for all players.

This question is incredibly difficult to tackle under normal circumstances, as you don’t have the experience you would like to have seeing how these players behave in relation to themselves, before and after, with and without fans. Covid has given us precisely this natural experience. Overnight, players went from full stadiums to empty stadiums.

We got curious and started to analyze the data. And we have found that indeed players are affected differently, those who are most prone to abuse seemingly experience an improvement in their performance the moment they no longer have that pressure on them. This effect survived even after we controlled for a host of potentially confounding factors – the weather, the time the game was played, the strength of the opposing team – so we firmly believe it’s there.

What metric did you use as a measure of player performance?

There are very detailed statistics, created by a publicly available algorithm, on the performance of each player after each match. It’s much more than goals scored, and it’s very objective: how far did the player go during the match? How many passes did they make?

These are stats from a database commonly used for fantastic team ratings and betting purposes, right?

Yes that is correct.

There is an interesting and growing literature on the effect that football fans have on teams as a whole. For example, it has been shown that the referees are not so favorable to the home team in the absence of spectators, and that the home advantage is not so pronounced in terms of the winner. What we wanted to do was look at individual players, see the differences in performance between those who come from certain ethnicities.

I want to come back to the very end of this match between England and Italy. Just imagine for a second what goes through the minds of these players as they approach that penalty, knowing not only that they have the same pressure as every other football player on the pitch, but also that they are Black, that they are in a minority, and they will most likely be treated exactly as they were treated when they made a mistake.

Think about the incredible pressure that is placed on these players. It almost makes you shiver. That’s why I don’t think it’s too big of a leap of the imagination to think that we could find something like this in the data.

What did your results show?

We found that African players did 3% better in the second part of the season compared to the first part. You might be thinking, OK, 3% isn’t that bad. But if you were talking about the productivity or profits of a company and its workers, 3% would be huge. If you think of football players as hardworking, which is what they are, and that they are 3% less productive, it affects the team as a whole.

These are economic costs, not just moral or ethical concerns. Players of African descent play less well in front of spectators, but no one else plays better, so overall the quality of the game is declining. This is something that should bother club owners as they invest in the players.

We also looked at players from teams we know were particularly prone to abuse early in the season. Italian authorities are actually recording episodes of abuse by fans at the stadium, so we know which teams were playing in matches before the lockdown where there was such racist behavior. And it was the players from those teams, including Napoli, who saw the biggest improvement in their performance – 10% better – in the absence of spectators.

We are talking about the elite of the elite athletes of the country. They are the best placed in terms of social status and money earned. The fact that these athletes are affected is therefore extremely worrying; if you looked at the lower leagues, there must be a lot more to that.

Do you think your study group, with African players making up only 7 percent of the total, was strong enough to deliver significant results?

It’s a good question. But the number of players only plays a role to a certain extent, as these are players that we observe several times during the year – each week 38 observations for each player during the season, about half before. locking and half after. The statistical power of the analysis is very strong because we are comparing exactly the same people, not just two random samples, before and after.

As fans in the stadium, we all like to think that we are more than just spectators, that our voices have a real impact on the game. Your research suggests that we actually do it, and in an uncomfortable way.

Sometimes I get a little worried about what we’ve done here as we may inadvertently reassure people in their belief that yelling racist things is going to help their team win. On the other hand, I firmly believe that research should aim to uncover facts and always be transparent about them. In this case, I hope those in charge of the economics of this game will understand that racism costs them money and hurts their investments. When some players can’t express their full potential, the game just isn’t as good-looking and engaging as it could be.

The inquiries were raised because at the recent shot put event a UK national record of 55 feet would have been set had it not been for the 16 pound weight to have been found to have been half an ounce too light .



Source link

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/measuring-the-cost-of-racial-abuse-in-football/feed/ 0
No change in food intake after quitting smoking; a prospective study in Switzerland | BMC Nutrition http://www.jewsformorality.org/no-change-in-food-intake-after-quitting-smoking-a-prospective-study-in-switzerland-bmc-nutrition/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/no-change-in-food-intake-after-quitting-smoking-a-prospective-study-in-switzerland-bmc-nutrition/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 23:53:25 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/no-change-in-food-intake-after-quitting-smoking-a-prospective-study-in-switzerland-bmc-nutrition/ To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess weight gain and dietary changes in non-smokers to be conducted in Switzerland. Our results show that smoking cessation was associated with a mean weight change of 2.1 kg, corresponding to a 0.9 unit increase in BMI over a median follow-up of 5 years. Conversely, and […]]]>

To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess weight gain and dietary changes in non-smokers to be conducted in Switzerland. Our results show that smoking cessation was associated with a mean weight change of 2.1 kg, corresponding to a 0.9 unit increase in BMI over a median follow-up of 5 years. Conversely, and contrary to our initial hypothesis, no change in the total reported calorie intake was found.

Changes in food intake after quitting

Weight gain increased by an average of 2.1 kg, a finding consistent with a meta-analysis and systematic review involving various populations around the world [1]; It should be noted that the authors did not find any studies carried out in Switzerland. Indeed, weight gain is a common phenomenon after quitting smoking and is one of the reasons why many smokers tend to relapse. [1]. Yet, proper dietary management after quitting smoking has been shown to prevent weight gain. [14]. In this study, only nine participants who quit reported dieting and did not lose weight compared to participants without dieting. Therefore, our results suggest that effective dietary support for weight control is not provided on a regular basis to people who quit smoking.

No change in total energy expenditure or the prevalence of inactivity was found. Our results mimic those of a previous study, where no change in physical activity was noted after stopping [15]. Nevertheless, the data on physical activity were questioned via a questionnaire and reporting bias cannot be excluded; other studies evaluating physical activity by more precise methods (ie accelerometry) would be welcome.

Contrary to what was assumed, no increase in declared total energy intake was observed in ex-smokers. Our results do not reproduce those of studies conducted 30 years ago [2, 3] but are consistent with a recent Australian study, where weight gain associated with stopping smoking was not explained by worsening eating and physical activity behaviors [6]. One possible explanation for the Australian study results is that the authors assessed food intake one year after quitting, and smokers have been shown to increase their energy intake soon after quitting. [2, 4]. Yet, in our study, no difference in energy intake was found between the different withdrawal periods. Therefore, our results suggest that smokers do not increase their energy intake in the first year after quitting. However, our sample size was small and it would be interesting to replicate the study in a larger sample.

The dietary intake of people who quit smoking changed little before and after quitting, and the results were reproduced after stratification by sex or BMI category. The absolute decrease in total and saturated fat (kcal) intake was small and clinically irrelevant, as it corresponded to 2 g of fat per day. Therefore, our results suggest that the changes in food intake seen in smokers do not contribute to weight gain.

Comparison between groups of smokers

Dropouts had higher weight gain than maintainers and non-smokers, suggesting the increase was not due to aging. No significant difference was found regarding changes in diet. Women who quit smoking showed a higher intake of total and animal protein compared to women who never smoked, while no difference was found between people who quit and those who did. quit smoking. Our results do not replicate those of a previous study where women who quit smoking had more energy and lower fat intake than women who continued to smoke. [16]. Yet several studies indicate that the benefits of quitting smoking outweigh the benefits of weight gain. [17]. Therefore, people who quit smoking should refrain from smoking, even at the cost of increased body weight. Ideally, people who want to quit smoking should receive lifestyle advice to prevent and control weight gain after quitting.

Association with time elapsed since shutdown

Few changes in anthropometric or dietary intake were found based on time since stopping. The exception was fruit, the consumption of which declined among participants who had quit for less than a year but increased thereafter. A previous study showed an inverse association between the consumption of fruits and vegetables and weight gain in people who quit smoking [18], while no such association was found in another [6]. While we cannot rule out that this association may have occurred by chance, negative but statistically insignificant correlations were found between changes in fruit or vegetable consumption and weight (Supplementary Table 11). Nonetheless, our results suggest that food intake does not change after quitting smoking and is not associated with weight gain, a finding also reported elsewhere. [6].

Possible mediators

In this study, neither physical activity nor changes in food intake could explain the weight gain that occurred in the majority of participants. It has been suggested that dietary changes occur within the first 6 months and return to baseline levels after a year. [4]. This could explain the lack of differences in food intake, as most people quit smoking for more than a year. Another possible explanation would be changes in the gut microbiota after quitting [19] but more studies are needed to better identify the determinants of weight gain after quitting smoking.

Several studies have suggested that low socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with a low likelihood of quitting smoking [20], although the reverse trend (i.e. low-income people having a higher likelihood of attempting to quit) was reported in a German study [21]. In a previous article, we found no clear association between education level and dropout, although a trend (p= 0.064) towards lower dropout rates with lower education levels was found [22]. Therefore, it is possible that participants who quit smoking had a higher SES and therefore a healthier lifestyle, which did not change significantly after quitting.

Limitations of the study

This study has several limitations. First, the sample size was small, resulting in low statistical power. Therefore, it is likely that some changes in food intake have gone unnoticed; again, the sample size is comparable to another study (NOT= 124) [6]. Second, the timing of smoking cessation was not available for almost half of the participants. Therefore, it was not possible to assess whether changes in food intake occurred during the first years of smoking cessation. Third, a large fraction of smokers were excluded, which may limit the generalizability of the results. However, this was necessary because many excluded participants had no dietary data or erroneous data. Fourth, the same food composition database was used at both times, and possible changes in the composition of some foods may have occurred. Further studies should attempt to assess this point. Finally, our study was conducted in a geographically limited population and the results may not be applicable in other settings.

We conclude that smoking cessation is associated with weight gain in most smokers and is not accompanied by significant changes in food intake. Systematic dietary support should be provided to all smokers wishing to quit smoking.


Source link

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/no-change-in-food-intake-after-quitting-smoking-a-prospective-study-in-switzerland-bmc-nutrition/feed/ 0
Grua / O’Connell Fellows Pursue Eclectic Research http://www.jewsformorality.org/grua-oconnell-fellows-pursue-eclectic-research/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/grua-oconnell-fellows-pursue-eclectic-research/#respond Mon, 12 Jul 2021 19:35:58 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/grua-oconnell-fellows-pursue-eclectic-research/ The Grua / O’Connell Awards support the research of students supervised by professors in all disciplines. Six students received Grua / O’Connell Research Awards this summer to study a range of topics representing the scope of the liberal arts. They study reporting on conflict, literature and evil, partisanship within the Federal Election Commission, access to […]]]>

The Grua / O’Connell Awards support the research of students supervised by professors in all disciplines.

Six students received Grua / O’Connell Research Awards this summer to study a range of topics representing the scope of the liberal arts. They study reporting on conflict, literature and evil, partisanship within the Federal Election Commission, access to health care for Brazilian women, the digital economy, activism and “white guilt” and mathematical measurements of vibrations.

Fellows are supported by an endowment fund established in 2007 by Peter Grua ’76 and Mary O’Connell ’76. While these particular college grants fund projects in any discipline, others, like the Coles Undergraduate Research Fellowship or the Watterson Summer Fellowship, fund research in specific areas.

Each year, the Student Grants Committee evaluates student proposals for allocating research funds. Cindy Stocks, director of the Office for Student Fellowships and Research, said that “tThe opportunity to design and carry out your own research project, and to do so under the close mentorship of a Bowdoin faculty member, is a tremendous learning experience. “

Scholarships can get students to co-write papers with a professor and help them compete for national scholarships and graduate schools.

“Former scholars recount the exhilaration they felt upon realizing that they could contribute to their field of study and the importance their mentor played in their academic and professional life long after graduation. summer stock market, ”Stocks said.

Below is a brief description of the Grua / O’Connell Laureates’ projects this summer.


Source link

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/grua-oconnell-fellows-pursue-eclectic-research/feed/ 0
Majority of 2011 article co-authored by criminal law committee member plagiarized http://www.jewsformorality.org/majority-of-2011-article-co-authored-by-criminal-law-committee-member-plagiarized/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/majority-of-2011-article-co-authored-by-criminal-law-committee-member-plagiarized/#respond Sun, 11 Jul 2021 05:31:11 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/majority-of-2011-article-co-authored-by-criminal-law-committee-member-plagiarized/ Several sections of an article co-authored by Balraj Chauhan, a member of the Interior Ministry’s Committee for Criminal Law Reforms, are plagiarized. The article, titled “Good Governance: Search for Accountability Mechanism,” was published in the Indian Journal of Public Administration in October 2011. Chauhan was the vice-chancellor of the Dharmashastra National Law University in Jabalpur, […]]]>

Several sections of an article co-authored by Balraj Chauhan, a member of the Interior Ministry’s Committee for Criminal Law Reforms, are plagiarized. The article, titled “Good Governance: Search for Accountability Mechanism,” was published in the Indian Journal of Public Administration in October 2011.

Chauhan was the vice-chancellor of the Dharmashastra National Law University in Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh until mid-June of this year. Chauhan’s co-author Mridul Srivastava is Deputy Registrar at Dr Ram Manohar Lohiya National Law University in Lucknow. The IJPA is a peer-reviewed journal of the Indian Institute of Public Administration, which describes itself as an autonomous academic institution. Chauhan and Srivastava’s article is just over 4,500 words long. Of these, at least 3,500 words had already appeared in other publications, written by other authors, and only just over nine hundred words appear to be original.

The CRCL is a committee that the Home Office has established to review India’s criminal laws. On its website, the committee states that it “endeavors to recommend reforms” of Indian criminal laws “in a principled, effective and efficient manner”. However, lawyers, activists and academics criticized the committee’s constitution because it was not representative of the country and did not include members of Dalits, Adivasis or other marginalized communities.

Chauhan’s article reproduces large sections of a 1999 article by Ngaire Woods, an academic who at the time was a lecturer in international relations at the University of Oxford. Woods is currently the Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government in Oxford. His article, titled “Good Governance in International Organizations”, was published in volume 5 of the journal “Global Governance” in its January-March 1999 issue. Chauhan’s paper uses entire sections of Woods’ paper without quote or credit it.

In fact, Chauhan’s article does not contain any citation in the body of the article. However, Chauhan’s article has a list at the end titled “A Select Reading,” which mentions another Woods article. Chauhan’s article says: “The article here is based on research conducted for the Group of Twenty-Four and published under the title Ngaire Woods, Governance in International Organizations: The Case for Reform in the Bretton Woods Institutions UNCTAD / Group of Twenty-Four International monetary and financial questions for the 1990s. Volume IX (Geneva; United Nations, 1998). This phrase also appears to be copied exactly from a quote at the end of Woods’ 1999 article, which referred to his own past work.


Source link

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/majority-of-2011-article-co-authored-by-criminal-law-committee-member-plagiarized/feed/ 0
JPS selection for a French-speaking school in Dubai http://www.jewsformorality.org/jps-selection-for-a-french-speaking-school-in-dubai/ http://www.jewsformorality.org/jps-selection-for-a-french-speaking-school-in-dubai/#respond Sat, 10 Jul 2021 08:40:59 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/jps-selection-for-a-french-speaking-school-in-dubai/ Jumeirah Bachelorette School is an open-minded, international school that teaches all international programs to students aged 3-18. Located in the heart of Dubai with stunning views of the Burj Khalifa, the school has magnificent facilities on a large, leafy campus, a calm and peaceful oasis in the midst of the hustle and bustle of Dubai. […]]]>

Jumeirah Bachelorette School is an open-minded, international school that teaches all international programs to students aged 3-18. Located in the heart of Dubai with stunning views of the Burj Khalifa, the school has magnificent facilities on a large, leafy campus, a calm and peaceful oasis in the midst of the hustle and bustle of Dubai.

Recognizing its effectiveness for the well-being of students and teachers, the Writing Education Association (ACE) awarded JPS the only school outside the UK to receive the Guidemark School award. In addition to educating its students, the school focuses on developing their characters and personality traits, thus preparing them to face their future challenges with confidence.

In recent years, JPS has developed an ambitious Francophone program at the service of a continuously growing Francophone community that seeks an international and quality education that not only allows its children to progress academically, but also to further deepen their knowledge of their own. language. . And their parent cultures in multiple cultural contexts.

A team of French mother tongue educators, experts and trained by an international organization, is responsible for implementing an ambitious French-speaking curriculum based on its content and the philosophy of the French national program. Methods of teaching the international baccalaureate. The balance between grammatical, literary and cultural aspects allows us to maintain and improve the linguistic level of our French mother tongue pupils and to deal with all cultural aspects linked to the countries of the Francophonie.

Students who join our French-speaking program allow open and international cultural exchanges from different French-speaking countries (Switzerland, France, Belgium, Canada, Tunisia, etc.) in small groups of a maximum of 6 students on average.

Students should learn to appreciate the nature of language and literature, their many implications, their power and their beauty. They will be encouraged to recognize that this language proficiency is an indispensable communication tool in all communities. In addition, language and literature attract creative processes and promote the development of imagination and creativity through personal expression.

3 weeks of teaching in French in primary school

In elementary school, our French-speaking students receive three teaching sessions per week, during which the French language is a communication tool in the classroom in all areas: written, spoken and read, work and friendly situations and in most cases two teachers in the classroom in attendance. Additionally, in recent years, JBS Alliance has contracted with Franchise to offer weekly extracurricular classes in France (depending on the relaxation of rules linked to the COVID-19 outbreak, of course).

3 weeks of teaching in French language and literature in high school

In high school, the Intermediate Year Program (PPCS) comprehensively contributes to the intellectual, social, emotional and physical well-being of students. French language and literature students receive 3 teaching sessions per week, during which the reading of classical and literary works from various French-speaking countries is the cornerstone of the critical analysis of texts and the development of thought. Critical thinking and communication skills. Once they have reached our graduation program, our French-speaking students can apply for a bilingual degree, which gives access to prestigious universities around the world.

While demonstrating academic rigor, the MYP Language and Literature course has communication skills and linguistic and analytical skills for students, which can also be used to develop intermediate comprehension in all other subject groups. By interacting with selected texts, students can discover moral, social, economic, political, cultural and environmental factors that contribute to the development of skills in concept formation, decision-making and ethical reasoning, as well as intellectual property. . Qualities of the learner.

For more information


Source link

]]>
http://www.jewsformorality.org/jps-selection-for-a-french-speaking-school-in-dubai/feed/ 0