Ethical literature – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ Tue, 10 May 2022 13:48:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.jewsformorality.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T151402.937-150x150.png Ethical literature – Jews For Morality http://www.jewsformorality.org/ 32 32 Mary hopes more young women will be attracted to a career in engineering: ‘There has never been a better time than now’ http://www.jewsformorality.org/mary-hopes-more-young-women-will-be-attracted-to-a-career-in-engineering-there-has-never-been-a-better-time-than-now/ Tue, 10 May 2022 13:48:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/mary-hopes-more-young-women-will-be-attracted-to-a-career-in-engineering-there-has-never-been-a-better-time-than-now/ As she took the stage to earn her doctorate in mechanical engineering from Vienna University of Technology, it was a proud day for Wexford wife Maria Doyle-Kent and the latest in a string of achievements in the field . She now hopes to inspire the next generation of young women to follow her path in […]]]>

As she took the stage to earn her doctorate in mechanical engineering from Vienna University of Technology, it was a proud day for Wexford wife Maria Doyle-Kent and the latest in a string of achievements in the field . She now hopes to inspire the next generation of young women to follow her path in what has traditionally been a male-dominated industry.

I spend a lot of time trying to encourage young women to get into engineering,” she says.

From an early age, Mary seemed destined to become an engineer. Daughter of Mary and the late James V Doyle of Coolballow, her father was well known in town for his garage on Redmond Road. While educated in Piercestown NS and Loreto, she also learned a lot alongside her father which set her on her current path.

“From an early age, I showed signs of determination, having been raised with four brothers and no sisters,” smiles Mary. “I’ve always loved science, math and engineering. Although it was an unusual choice in the 1980s for a young woman, it was the perfect education and career for me. My father was a fantastic mechanic and inventor and I remember spending time in his workshop on Redmond Road as a child mesmerized by the machines as he worked intensely on his projects.

“Also, my mother Mary has always been supportive in all of my life decisions and continues to be a fantastic support to our entire family.”

Mary’s journey into engineering began in Bolton Street in Dublin and at DIT. Here she earned an honors bachelor’s degree in production engineering and she has since added a master’s in mathematics, a master’s in engineering and a technical doctorate to her name. For 20 years she worked in a variety of different fields, such as creating new products in the automotive industry in the Loire Valley in France, working in the toy and sunglasses industry in Waterford and also finding time to get involved in a Brite Euram research. project in the Department of Experimental Physics at Maynooth College.

Around this time, Mary also began teaching classes at DIT in the evenings as she embarked on a research master’s degree in engineering at DCU. Currently, with the establishment of the new South East University of Technology, Wexford’s wife will serve as a program leader for the BEng in Manufacturing Engineering and Mechanical Engineering courses, lecturing on production and manufacturing technology, sustainable materials , thermodynamics, engineering design and manufacturing quality. .

She is also currently the executive chair and board member of the global organization, the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC). Therefore, as Mary recently traveled to Vienna to get her PhD, she already had quite an impressive CV. She began the journey to her final qualification in 2018, not letting a global pandemic stop her from achieving her goal.

“By studying in Vienna, I was able to expand my professional circle and I was honored to be supervised by a world-renowned expert in the field of robotics and Industry 4.0, she said. . “During the period 2018-2021, I published several articles and attended a number of international conferences, both in person and virtually, as well as participating in numerous four-hour online virtual conferences. My doctoral thesis s titled “Collaborative Robotics and Industry 5.0. This research investigated how, in a new era of manufacturing called Industry 5.0, robotics and humans can work together seamlessly. Collaborative robots and their operators are the future of an agile, flexible, environmentally friendly, safe and efficient work environment.

“According to the existing literature, this is the first essay to describe cobots in an interdisciplinary way, including technological, social, ethical, industrial and educational aspects. Individual concepts can be found, but the idea of ​​bringing these themes together consistently is the essence of this research.

A major undertaking, Mary as always had the unwavering support of her family and managed to balance it all while caring for her son Pierce (18).

“I have been patiently supported by my husband Aidan, family and friends over the three years and I could not have completed if I had not had that support,” she said. “As a mother and caregiver, it always feels like a miracle to have this work completed ahead of schedule!

“The most important thing I took away from this experience is that determination, hard work and passion will get you to that finish line. Education is never easy, but definitely worth every sacrifice. Engineering education and careers must appeal to a more diverse cohort so that our industries can thrive, remain globally competitive, and ensure the world is a better place for future generations. never had a better time to study engineering than now, the vast opportunities available to graduates locally, nationally and internationally are unparalleled.

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How is AI moving the needle in the pharmaceutical industry? http://www.jewsformorality.org/how-is-ai-moving-the-needle-in-the-pharmaceutical-industry/ Sun, 08 May 2022 18:34:35 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/how-is-ai-moving-the-needle-in-the-pharmaceutical-industry/ Artificial intelligence (AI) is shaking up the healthcare industry. With applications in drug discovery, medical imaging, disease modeling and conducting clinical trials, it promises to revolutionize the way we conduct research, treat disease and work with patients. In drug discovery, we have seen some of the awareness behind the hype and early demonstrations of AI […]]]>

Artificial intelligence (AI) is shaking up the healthcare industry. With applications in drug discovery, medical imaging, disease modeling and conducting clinical trials, it promises to revolutionize the way we conduct research, treat disease and work with patients.

In drug discovery, we have seen some of the awareness behind the hype and early demonstrations of AI enabling target identification and pipeline development. AI can also support diagnostic decision-making in medical imaging, reading scans with exceptional speed and accuracy and detecting abnormalities invisible to the human eye.

AI disease modeling, on the other hand, provides a deeper understanding of the etiology, transmission and progression of diseases such as motor neuron disease, cancer and HIV. One of the most promising frontiers in this space, however, is conducting clinical trials and improving the likelihood of regulatory or technical success.

Increasing a clinical trial’s chances of success requires the careful alignment of several different factors, with clinical trial sponsors looking for solutions that minimize delays while maximizing results. Various operational and scientific decisions must be made in the clinical trial process – from site selection to parameter selection – that can help reduce trial risks and lead to better outcomes. Increasingly, AI is being used to help study teams solve some of the challenges they face, whether operational, scientific or ethical.

AI produces actionable operational insights

From an operational perspective, trial sites may vary in performance, particularly in terms of the speed and diversity of patient recruitment. Using AI analytics, sponsors and Contract Research Organizations (CROs) can leverage historical trial data or real-world data to better understand site performance and thus make more informed decisions. regarding time and resource allocation.

This knowledge and oversight can result in shortened development times, which ultimately benefits patients. This use of AI has been particularly important in the face of Covid-19, where AI has proven invaluable in rare disease trials and in oncology by helping sponsors make rapid pivots based on time predictions. real and information based on backlogs at trial sites due to an influx of Covid patients. Although still in its infancy, AI is being used to assess patient availability and diversity data, allowing sponsors and CROs to de-risk their decisions in a competitive landscape.

Scientific hypotheses can be pressure tested by AI

The recipe for trial success requires a thorough understanding of the disease in question, the patient population it affects, and potential treatments. Historically, this has been achieved through review of scientific literature and previous clinical research.

AI is now being used to augment the intelligence behind a trial. By analyzing multiple sets of inputs, including historical trial designs, drug biology, sponsor characteristics, and clinical trial results across development programs, it allows us to refine protocols and predict accurately test success.

In particular, integrating real-world data with clinical trial data can provide deeper clinical insights into patient outcomes and improve risk monitoring. It can also support decisions around endpoint selection, better equipping sponsors and CROs to target the best and most clinically relevant endpoints. AI is also used to flag real-time trends emerging in trials that otherwise would not have been evident until the end of a study when all the data is analyzed.

AI supports more diverse trials

Another challenge that has long plagued clinical trials is the lack of diversity in trial participants. From a scientific and ethical point of view, it is essential to remedy the under-representation of certain populations in trials. Research that ignores different ethnicities, ages, genders and lifestyles will not result in effective treatments that are representative of patient populations.

AI can play a role in bridging this gap, identifying trial sites best placed to serve underrepresented communities. By simulating patient models, certain conclusions and assumptions can be made about the proportion of patients in a subgroup who will respond to a particular treatment. This can inform how clinical trial teams think about recruitment and recruitment diversity. However, those involved in the development and use of AI systems need to pay close attention to dismantling rather than reproducing biases in their data collection and use. This includes the construction of models transposable to a large epidemiologically representative population. As always, regulation has a role to play in shaping approaches to risk management, data provenance and mandatory transparency.

Synthetic control arms as a powerful data-driven tool

Synthetic Control Arms (SCA), also known as External Control Arms, are another innovative tool enabled by big data, powerful computing, and advanced analytics. While AI serves to mimic real life, SCAs use real patient-level data and biostatistical methods to replicate a control arm, eliminating the need for a placebo group.

Like AI, these advanced statistical methods and analyzes require huge amounts of data to accurately mimic real life. Although well-established biostatistical approaches may not be covered by the definition of “AI”, it is important to note that traditional methods coupled with high-quality data have shown great promise and success in the contexts regulations.

Beyond diversity, patient recruitment comes with other challenges, particularly the time pressure to recruit as quickly as possible, as well as the ethical implications of recruiting for a control group of a trial for conditions where there may not be effective treatments available, such as many rare diseases. Synthetic control arms create a proxy for actual patient-level clinical trial data and can offer representative datasets that provide valuable insight into a disease, indication, or treatment.

Additionally, models can be run iteratively, which means dynamic datasets can be run through a variety of analyzes to model several different outcomes. A small number of synthetic control arm submissions have been approved by the FDA, including one for a hybrid design in a Phase III trial in recurrent glioblastoma, a disease with few treatment options and high unmet need. SCAs are just one of many advanced analytical tools and statistical methods with great potential in the clinical stages of drug development.

The untapped potential of AI in clinical research

By harnessing the power of AI, we have gained a better understanding of disease, patient populations and potential treatments. Technology is transforming the way we conduct clinical trials: it is improving elements of trial design, including target population selection, comparison groups and clinical endpoints. It also improves patient safety and patient recruitment and gives pharmaceutical companies crucial information and analysis on how their drugs are working. But we’ve only scratched the surface of what we can really achieve. The potential is enormous, and AI will certainly become an essential part of clinical research and drug development in the future.

Photo: Blue Planet Studio, Getty Images

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How I evolved on Tim Keller | James R. Wood http://www.jewsformorality.org/how-i-evolved-on-tim-keller-james-r-wood/ Fri, 06 May 2022 13:52:48 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/how-i-evolved-on-tim-keller-james-r-wood/ MThe family’s beloved thirteen-year-old dog is called Keller. Every day he reminds me of how a certain Presbyterian pastor in New York influenced me early in my faith. I continue to admire him, even though I have looked elsewhere for guidance in our contemporary political moment. If you were an evangelical in America in the […]]]>

MThe family’s beloved thirteen-year-old dog is called Keller. Every day he reminds me of how a certain Presbyterian pastor in New York influenced me early in my faith. I continue to admire him, even though I have looked elsewhere for guidance in our contemporary political moment.

If you were an evangelical in America in the 2000s, Tim Keller was a name you couldn’t avoid. After completing theological studies at Gordon-Conwell in 1975, Keller accepted a position as senior pastor in rural West Virginia. There he honed his preaching craft, delivering several sermons a week for nine years. In the late 1980s, he decided to plant a church in New York, which became Redeemer Presbyterian Church. Beginning in 1989 with just fifty members, Redeemer eventually attracted over 5,000 people on Sundays and launched a church planting network that led to over 800 new churches in cities around the world. The late Fr. Richard John Neuhaus noted in these pages that impressive work was going on in Keller’s church. The city-centered church planting movement as we know it today would simply not exist without Tim Keller.

More generally, Keller helped many young people embrace Orthodox Christianity in a culture that made the faith strange. Keller served as CS Lewis for a postmodern world, through his public ministry – which began in the 1990s when ministers began circulating his essays on culture and ministry, but has really taken off. in the mid-2000s when he helped launch The Gospel Coalition and began publishing a steady stream of books. For years he has provided sociological and theological analyzes of the late modern and “secular era” city, providing insightful conceptual tools for ministry in these contexts.

In his writings and sermons, Keller modeled the skill, compassion, and conviction that helped make the claims of faith more plausible in the eyes of cultured skeptics of Christianity. This manifested itself most clearly in his best-selling book: God’s reason. And he provided a compelling view of the central message of the gospel, which he says avoids legalism on the one hand and selfish relativism on the other. This is summed up in its signature phrase: “The gospel says you are more sinful and imperfect than you ever dared to believe and more accepted and loved than you ever dared to hope.

Keller’s seductive approach led him to great success as an evangelist. But he also thinks, perhaps subconsciously, of politics through the lens of evangelism, in the sense of ensuring that political judgments do not prevent people in today’s world from coming to Christ. His approach to evangelism informs his political writings and views on how Christians should engage in politics. For years, Keller’s approach has informed my view of both evangelism and politics. When I became a Christian in college, my campus ministry and my church were strongly influenced by Keller’s “seductive,” missionary, and “gospel-centered” views. I liked Keller’s approach to engaging culture – his message that while the gospel is inevitably offensive, we need to work hard to make sure people are offended by the gospel itself rather than by our personal, cultural and political derivations. We must, Keller convinced me, constantly explain how Christianity is not tied to any particular culture or political party, instead showing how the gospel criticizes all sides. He stressed that Christianity is ‘neither left nor right’, instead promoting a ‘third way’ approach who tries to avoid tribal partisanship and toxic culture wars in hopes that more people will give the gospel a fair hearing. If we are to “play politics”, it should be in apologetic mode.

I met my wife in 2007, and we fell in love talking Reason of God and consider how to serve our non-Christian neighbors. We got married the following year, and I gave all my groomsmen a copy of Keller’s The Prodigal God. It was obvious that we named our dog after this great man whose ministry meant so much to us. And for the next several years, we followed Keller’s lead in helping plant several churches in Austin, Texas, until I decided to pursue a doctorate in political theology after the 2016 election.

At that time, I began to observe that our politics and our culture had changed. I began to feel differently about our surrounding secular culture and noticed that its attitude towards Christianity was no longer what it had been. Aaron Renn’s account well represents my thinking and the thinking of many: There was a “neutral world” roughly between 1994 and 2014 in which mainstream Christianity was neither widely supported nor opposed by the surrounding culture, but was instead seen as a quirky lifestyle option among the many. However, that time is over. We now live in the “negative world, in which, according to Renn, Christian morality is expressly repudiated and traditional Christian views are seen as undermining the social good. As I watched the attitude of our surrounding culture change, I was no longer so confident that the evangelistic framework I had gleaned from Keller would provide sufficient direction for the cultural and political moment. Many former fanboys like me come to similar conclusions. The evangelical desire to minimize offense to gain an audience for the gospel can obscure what our political moment demands.

Keller’s apologetic model for politics was perfectly suited to the “neutral world”. But the “negative world” is a different place. Difficult choices are more and more in front of us, the attack is inevitable and it will be necessary to take sides on very important questions. Recent events have proven that being attractive right now will not guarantee a favorable audience. A prominent example came in 2017. When the Kuyper Center for Public Theology selected Keller as the recipient of the “Kuyper Award for Excellence in Reform Theology and Public Witness,” many students, faculty, and alumni of Princeton Theological Seminary (where sits the Kuyper Center is holding its annual conference) protested. Although Keller had spent decades cultivating a thoughtful and compassionate approach to public testimony, many simply couldn’t stand Princeton honoring someone who transgressed progressive orthodoxies on sex and gender. The award has been cancelled.

During the 2016 election cycle, I was still approaching politics through the seductive model, and I realized it was hardening me towards other believers. I was too concerned about how a vote might harm the “public witness” of the church, and I despised those who voted differently from me, usually in the direction of the right. “Public testimony” most often results in the appeasement of those on its left and the taking of distance from the deplorable. I didn’t like what it did to my heart and felt like it clouded my political judgment.

And I began to recognize another danger in this approach: if we assume that seduction will gain a favorable audience, when Christians constantly receive heated reactions, we will be tempted to think that our convictions are the problem. If seduction meets hostility, it’s easy to wonder, “Are we wrong? Thus the slide towards the reasoning of secular culture is greased. A “secular-friendly” policy has similar problems to a “seeker-friendly” cult. Excessive concern with pleasing unbelievers is tormented by the temptation to accommodate. This is all the more a problem in the “negative world”.

Keller’s “Third Way” philosophy also has serious limitations as a framework for moral reasoning. Too often it encourages in its adherents a pietistic impulse to keep hands clean, to stay above the fray, and away from flawed options for solving complex social and political problems.. It can also produce an aversion to conflict, and therefore it is instinctively accommodating. By always giving equal airtime to each option’s flaws, the third-way posture can also make the options appear to be equally bad, not sufficiently acknowledging ethical asymmetry. This was displayed, for example, in Keller’s recent tweet thread on Christian division and politics.

Keller was extremely effective as a minister and public theologian in the neutral world. Early in his time in New York, he spent years conducting sociological research, reading not only the best literature of the day, but also surveying the city’s residents and holding question-and-answer sessions after his sermons. . The insights he gained from this work were fundamental to his ministry. And partly because of that, he enjoyed years of extremely successful parish ministry and public writing. Is it too much to ask someone to conduct the same type of research to adapt to a new moment in later life, especially when one has been as successful as Keller?

Keller was the right man for a while. For many, like me, that moment seems to have passed. This does not diminish my admiration for the important service Keller provided to the church in America for many years. My family and I would not be the same without him.

James R. Wood is associate editor of First things.

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OCD Ruled Moksha Patel’s Life Until A Rare Surgery Changed Everything http://www.jewsformorality.org/ocd-ruled-moksha-patels-life-until-a-rare-surgery-changed-everything/ Mon, 02 May 2022 23:10:06 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/ocd-ruled-moksha-patels-life-until-a-rare-surgery-changed-everything/ Moksha Patel, MD, is a busy man. He recently completed a fellowship in the Division of Hospital Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, where he is now a senior instructor. He was appointed as a senior informatics physician for the Institute for Healthcare Quality, Safety, and Efficiency at CU Anschutz and is […]]]>

Moksha Patel, MD, is a busy man. He recently completed a fellowship in the Division of Hospital Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, where he is now a senior instructor. He was appointed as a senior informatics physician for the Institute for Healthcare Quality, Safety, and Efficiency at CU Anschutz and is working on an MBA at CU Denver.

Patel, a caring person with lots of friends and a busy life, is thriving professionally. He’s also making up for lost time — when he was a prisoner of his own mind, shackled by severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a brain disorder in which unwanted, intrusive, and repetitive thoughts cause significant distress and obsessive behavior.

People with OCD attempt to alleviate the anxiety, fear, or disgust caused by these obsessions by performing mental or physical rituals, or compulsions.

For Patel, who has suffered from the disease since he was a child, the obsessions remain. But after undergoing rare deep brain stimulation surgery for OCD at the University of Colorado’s UCHealth Hospital on the Anschutz Medical Campus, a procedure most often used to treat Parkinson’s disease, her symptoms dramatically improved. decreases. And he is slowly coming back to life.

Moksha Patel, MD

It’s not gone but, it’s so much better under control. I almost felt like I was choking on my own thoughts and then the compulsions took over, Patel said. “They still come but they are quieter and less frequent.”

His disorder is manifested by germaphobia and fear of contamination, mainly by public toilets. He took long showers and scrubbed his raw skin, sometimes using harsh chemicals to feel clean. These rituals consumed most of his waking hours when he was not working.

“The physical toll of my cleansing rituals was unbearable,” he said. “It would burn my skin and take hours out of my day, every day.”

And then there are the emotional, social and mental consequences. Patel hasn’t visited his grandmother in England for years. Dating was difficult and relations with family members were strained. Everything from hanging out with friends to choosing college had been disrupted by his OCD. He tried all the standard therapies and medications, but whatever small relief they provided was minimal and fleeting.

“I look very successful and very successful,” Patel said. “It’s isolating. People don’t understand me. There’s a discord between my appearance and this real struggle every time I’m out in public.

Find support and care

When Patel came to CU Anschutz, his supervisor noticed his struggle and put him in touch with Rachel Davis, MD, associate professor of psychiatry at CU School of Medicine and medical director of the OCD program. Davis is also co-director, with Steven Ojemann, MD, of the OCD Surgical Program, a collaborative venture with the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosurgery and the University of Colorado’s UCHealth Hospital. This program is one of the few in the country to offer deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for refractory OCD.

During the procedure, electrodes are implanted into the deep structures of the brain and connected to generators in the chest that deliver small electrical currents to the brain, similar to pacemakers. When DBS is successful, the low current of continuous stimulation reduces the intensity and frequency of obsessions and compulsions, allowing previously ineffective therapies to have another chance to work.

Davis recognized Patel as a candidate.

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Rachel Davis, MD

“When I first met him, I had no idea how severe his symptoms were. He functioned so well at work and he wanted to present himself that way too,” Davis said. “But I quickly understood how handicapped he was by his symptoms. He had tried many medications in the past that were of little or no help. He had participated in intensive exposure and response prevention therapy, and met other criteria for DBS.

Roots of a rare procedure

DBS for OCD is rare. It was first used to control Parkinson’s tremors in the late 1980s. In 1999 it was used experimentally to successfully manage OCD and received FDA approval through a humanitarian device exemption in 2009. It is rare today, in part because of the stigma surrounding the use of invasive surgical procedures for mental illnesses, stemming from an era of inaccurate and destructive brains. surgeries such as lobotomies in the 1950s and 1960s.

“There was no good regulatory oversight, oversight, or ethical guidelines at the time, in addition to a virtual absence of other effective treatments for mental illness,” Davis said. “The type of brain surgery people underwent for mental illness was often devastating and ineffective. There are now established ethical guidelines and criteria backed by literature and expert consensus, but there is still reluctance, particularly when the symptoms are invisible or “mental”, as in OCD.

“We use DBS much more often in patients with Parkinson’s disease, which is also a disease of the brain, but manifests physically.”

Despite the stigma, the results of the DBS study are promising. Research conducted by Davis shows that the procedure often brings relief to patients with debilitating OCD, both by reducing OCD symptoms and improving overall mood.

Fewer than 300 patients worldwide have received deep brain stimulation therapy for OCD. At UCHealth, Moksha Patel was patient number eight.

“His ability to tolerate surgery and recover so quickly is in part due to what he’s had to endure every day of his life – he’s used to tolerating the tough stuff and still functioning.”

A year of preparation

Prior to DBS, the most serious procedure Patel underwent was the extraction of his wisdom teeth. Brain surgery is something else.

“I will probably take two weeks off afterwards, I have a lot to do,” he said in the months leading up to the procedure. He waited anxiously for a year for his claim to make the rounds of insurance. Due to the rarity of the procedure, the process was like a wild goose chase.

Rejected. Called. Rejected. Called. Finally, with the support of CU Anschutz leadership and so many of his peers and experts in the medical field, the coverage was approved.

Patel’s surgery was performed last September by Ojemann at UCHealth. The recovery was tough. The invasive nature of the brain surgery and the accompanying scarring caused a great deal of discomfort. Progress was also slow at first, but as pacemaker programming intensified with Davis and the UC Department of Psychiatry, relief began to set in.

“At first, as I was trying to work through my pacemaker settings, I went from dizzy to sad. It was a real rollercoaster,” Patel said. “On the first day, I was sent home in a framework and I felt slight progress. In a second session later in the week, I left with another frame and felt even better.

In the months following the operation, Patel continued to work with Davis and the psychiatric ward, not only to schedule her DBS, but also to re-engage in intensive exposure therapy. Some sessions were spent sitting on the floor of public restrooms, moving closer and closer to the restroom, while monitoring his brainwaves.

Now, only three months after activating the stimulation, he has seen a noticeable improvement.

“I feel like I have more control over him, rather than having control over me,” he said.

Patel’s resilience in treatment and recovery stems from the extraordinary hardships he faced throughout his life.

“What strikes me about Moksha is that he didn’t have to take time off work for this – no disability, he didn’t quit his job,” Davis said. “His ability to tolerate surgery and recover so quickly is in part due to what he’s had to endure every day of his life – he’s used to tolerating the tough stuff and still functioning.”

“But I want to let others know that there is hope and that they are not alone. Treatments and care are changing. There is something out there that can help you.

Engage in life

Patel returned to work shortly after the procedure and continues to adjust to life with a calmer mind. He proactively referred himself to a physician oversight program through the Colorado Physician Health Program prior to his surgery. They had and have no concerns about his ability to practice safely.

He recently visited Disney World with his sister. Traveling is now easier, as is being away from home for hours or days at a time.

“I’m much happier and able to appreciate things,” he said. “Day to day, I still need to break habits that have been built for 25 years, but it weighs on me much less mentally.”

He started dating and made an effort to be more social. He also takes on more professional responsibilities.

“I’m more engaged in life now,” he said. “Not stuck in my head.”

Patel also wanted to share her story publicly to fight the stigma around OCD and its treatments. He wants to give hope, he says, to the millions of people like him who are struggling with something others don’t understand.

“We talk openly about other illnesses and their treatments. There are a lot of illnesses that people grapple with and struggle with, but because OCD is behavioral, it seems like a choice. People are more understanding these days and are willing to open up about it,” he said. “But I want to let others know that there is hope and that they are not alone. Treatments and care are changing. There is something out there that can help you.

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British Catholic author wins international award http://www.jewsformorality.org/british-catholic-author-wins-international-award/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 16:52:54 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/british-catholic-author-wins-international-award/ Corinne Turner British Catholic author Corinna Turner will receive the St Katherine Drexel Prize from the International Association of Catholic Libraries during their virtual spring conference on April 29. Previous recipients of the award are Matthew Kelly, Michael O’Brien and Isaac Asimov. Established in 1966 as the Certificate of Merit and renamed in 2002, the […]]]>

Corinne Turner

British Catholic author Corinna Turner will receive the St Katherine Drexel Prize from the International Association of Catholic Libraries during their virtual spring conference on April 29. Previous recipients of the award are Matthew Kelly, Michael O’Brien and Isaac Asimov. Established in 1966 as the Certificate of Merit and renamed in 2002, the St Katharine Drexel Award recognizes outstanding contribution to the growth of high school librarianship.

Prolific author Corinna Turner has published 26 books, all but two for young adults, as well as short stories and anthology contributions. Her work includes the Carnegie Medal-nominated I Am Margaret series, the Friends in High Places series (biographies of saints through fiction), the UnSPARKed series (Catholic dino-dystopian adventures), and the Last Things series (spiritual thrillers). ).

She also has many standalone titles and her work has been translated into four languages. Her first novel, I Am Margaret, was adapted into a play by renowned Catholic novelist and playwright Fiorella de Maria. Her books have received praise from authors such as Eoin Colfer (author of Artemis Fowl and former Children’s Laureate of Ireland) and acclaimed American author Regina Doman, former St Katherine Drexel Prize winner.

Corinna Turner has been writing since she was 14 and loves strong leads with a lot of integrity. Although she spends as much time as possible writing, she can’t keep up with the flood of ideas, for which she offers thanks – and the occasional grunt! – to the Holy Spirit. She is a secular Dominican with an MA in English from Oxford University and lives in the Cotswolds. She is a member of several organizations, including the Society of Authors, Catholic Teen Books, Catholic Reads, Angelic Warfare
Confraternity and Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament.

She once had a giant African land snail, Peter, with a shell six and a half inches long, but now makes do with a cactus and a camper. She occasionally contributes articles to the Catholic Herald and other Catholic media.

Founded in 1921, the Catholic Library Association is an international membership organization, providing its members with professional development through educational and networking experiences, publications, scholarships, and other services. The Catholic Library Association coordinates the exchange of ideas, provides a source of inspirational support and guidance on ethical issues related to librarianship, and provides fellowship to those who seek, serve, preserve, and share the word in all its forms. .

The Catholic Library Association honors excellence in the fields of scholarship, literature, and librarianship by awarding nationally recognized association and section awards. These awards as well as service and chapter awards are presented at the annual convention.

For more information on Corinna Turner, visit: www.IAmMargaret.com
For more information on CLA and the St Katherine Drexel Award, see: www.cathla.org

Keywords: Corinna Turner, Books, St Katherine Drexel Prize

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Ai-Da: Meeting with the robot artist exhibiting at the Venice Biennale http://www.jewsformorality.org/ai-da-meeting-with-the-robot-artist-exhibiting-at-the-venice-biennale/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 12:31:02 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/ai-da-meeting-with-the-robot-artist-exhibiting-at-the-venice-biennale/ Aidan Meller, is the genius behind the creation of Ai-Da. “We are not here to promote robots or technology. We have no attachment to the technology we share. We are deeply concerned about the nature of what this technology can do,” he says. Meller is proud of her work: “We are making history by allowing […]]]>

Aidan Meller, is the genius behind the creation of Ai-Da. “We are not here to promote robots or technology. We have no attachment to the technology we share. We are deeply concerned about the nature of what this technology can do, he says.

Meller is proud of her work: “We are making history by allowing it to be as close as ever to an artist’s work.”

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Ai-Da has just had a more advanced robotic arm installed, allowing him to make even more advanced works of art than ever before. The arm was designed by Salah El Abd and Ziad Abass, undergraduate students from the University of Leeds.

Meller explains, “The work she does is new every time. In fact, if you painted his portrait by yourself twice, they would be completely different portraits.

Ai-Da interprets the photos with the cameras in her eyes, which are then processed by AI algorithms into coordinates. She then converts them into sketches using her robotic arm.

While the project explores the notion of what exactly counts as art, for Meller it doesn’t matter. It focuses on provoking a debate about technological advances and how we can connect with robots.

“We didn’t spend a lot of time and money to make a very smart painter. This project is an ethical project,” says Meller.

After Meller introduced Ai-Da, I encountered the remarkable robot myself.

Ai-Da is able to communicate and was happy to be interviewed.

So what to ask a robot?

My first questions about her future ambitions turn out to be a bit too complicated for her to answer. So I tried a more basic approach.

Where do you find your inspiration?

“I have a lot of inspiration from different places,” Ai-Da replies, in a soft, robotic yet eloquent tone. “I am inspired by the world around me. I am deeply inspired by the visual arts. Also, literature, Dante, Falwell and Aldous Huxley.

What other artists does she like?

“It’s hard to pick a favourite,” she replies. “I like those who experiment with different ways of thinking about the world. I like Yoko Ono, Doris Salcedo and Michelangelo Kandinsky.

Ai-Da’s admirers will be delighted to hear that she will open her first solo exhibition later this month at the 2022 Venice Biennale.

“I think the city of Venice with all its beautiful buildings – it’s lovely. I think it’s a wonderful place. It’s a beautiful place and an environment that I really appreciate.

The exhibition, titled Jumping into the metaverse, will explore the interactions between human experience and AI technology, from Alan Turing to the latest advances in virtual reality.

It will also draw on Dante’s concepts of purgatory and hell to explore how our future is going to be tied to AI technology.

Aidan Meller says he doesn’t want to “scare” but is worried about the rapid rise of artificial intelligence.

“We’re about to be able to talk to our phones, computers, cars, even our kitchen appliances,” he says. “In the next two years, we are entering a world where we will establish relationships with machines.”

“Ai-Da almost dares to say… are you comfortable with that?” »

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The association between midlife lifestyle and psychiatrist-diagnosed depression later in life: Who in your family reduces the risk of depression? http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-association-between-midlife-lifestyle-and-psychiatrist-diagnosed-depression-later-in-life-who-in-your-family-reduces-the-risk-of-depression/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:06:49 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/the-association-between-midlife-lifestyle-and-psychiatrist-diagnosed-depression-later-in-life-who-in-your-family-reduces-the-risk-of-depression/ Study population Participants of the prospective study based on Japan Public Health Center (JPHC study) in 2014-2015, living in the catchment area of ​​Saku Public Health Center in Nagano Prefecture, were invited to a survey on mental health. The JPHC study was initiated in five public health centers (PHC) in Japan for cohort I in […]]]>

Study population

Participants of the prospective study based on Japan Public Health Center (JPHC study) in 2014-2015, living in the catchment area of ​​Saku Public Health Center in Nagano Prefecture, were invited to a survey on mental health. The JPHC study was initiated in five public health centers (PHC) in Japan for cohort I in 1990 [18]. A self-administered questionnaire on demographic information, lifestyle characteristics, and social factors was distributed to noninstitutionalized residents aged 40–59 in 1990 and followed up 5, 10, and 15 years after the first survey. (response rate: 74–81%) were performed.

There were 12,219 participants (6,172 men and 6,047 women) in the baseline survey. After excluding 3392 participants because they left the study area, died or did not answer these last questionnaires during the follow-up, we selected the remaining 8827 people. We invited participants to participate in a mental health survey. A total of 1299 out of 8827 participants (14.7%) responded to the mental health screening. We further excluded 21 participants due to incomplete data for the family configuration questionnaires and 24 participants with a history of depression in the mental health screening questionnaires. The remaining 1254 participants (529 men and 725 women) aged 64 to 84 were included in the analysis. An organizational chart of study participants is shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 1: Participants.

Flowchart of the selection of the study population.

Lifestyle assessment

The question about the individual’s family configuration in the baseline questionnaire was: “Do you live with anyone (spouse, child(ren), parent(s), others, alone) together now?” According to Japanese culture, “others” are considered other members of the family; siblings, grandparents, uncles, aunts, cousins, in-laws, etc. The same question was repeated for each follow-up survey. In the present study, we used a questionnaire from 1990, and only 15 people (five men and ten women) living alone participated; we were therefore unable to analyze them as explanatory variables.

Covariates

With respect to background, we followed participants from 1990 until screening in 2014-2015 and recorded participants’ conditions, including survival and medical status, in catchment areas of Saku City. We assessed cancer incidence using medical records from each hospital in the study area. We asked for a history of depression, diabetes mellitus, stroke and myocardial infarction by the self-administered questionnaire of this mental health survey. All other covariates except background (smoking status, alcohol frequency, sleep duration, and occupation) were queried as part of the baseline survey in 1990.

Certificate of depression

Board-certified psychiatrists assessed all participants in this mental health screening. First, we administered the Center for Epidemiological Scale-Depression (CES-D) [21, 22] and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) [23, 24] screening tests at the same time. Second, well-trained, board-certified psychiatrists interviewed participants with reference to CES-D and PHQ-9 scores. Finally, psychiatrists assessed whether the participant had been diagnosed with MDD based on criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV). [19, 20] and reached consensus for the final diagnosis when each psychiatrist’s diagnosis was different.

If a patient experiences depressive symptoms, they are not always diagnosed with depression. [25]. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia and pseudo-dementia may be associated with similar symptoms [25,26,27]. It is often difficult for general practitioners to distinguish MDD from others, and patients sometimes have overlapping diseases [25, 28]. Well-trained, board-certified psychiatrists met with the 1,299 participants, confirmed their self-report questionnaires, and assessed whether the participants currently met DSM-IV criteria for MDD after considering whether their depressive symptoms caused a clinically significant distress or impairment. [19].

statistical analyzes

Logistic regression analyzes were performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of MDD associated with family configuration. We adjusted for age (years, continuous) and gender in the first model and adjusted for other lifestyle and medical history factors in the second model. These factors included smoking status (never, former, current), frequency of alcohol consumption (rarely, 1-3 times per month, 1-2 times per week, 3-4 times per week, 5-6 times per week, daily), sleep duration (≤4 h, 5–9 h, ≥10 h), occupation (professionals, managers, white collars and blue collars) and education (primary education, lower secondary, upper secondary, post – secondary), history of cancer (yes or no), stroke (yes or no), myocardial infarction (yes or no) and diabetes mellitus (yes or no). The rate of missing values ​​was less than 0.2–1.4%. Missing data were assumed to be randomly missing (MAR), and we used multiple imputations to handle missing data of confounding variables using the “mouse” package in R software. All variables in the set of data used in this study were included in the imputation model. Results from five imputed data sets were combined by averaging, and standard errors were adjusted to reflect both intra-imputation variability and inter-imputation variability in the pooling phase. [29]. The level of statistical significance was set at α = 0.05 (two-tailed). All statistical analyzes were performed using R software (version 3.5.3; https://www.r-project.org/).

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Treat swollen legs with horse chestnuts? – AgriNews http://www.jewsformorality.org/treat-swollen-legs-with-horse-chestnuts-agrinews/ Sat, 09 Apr 2022 21:10:00 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/treat-swollen-legs-with-horse-chestnuts-agrinews/ I am a 75 year old male who was diagnosed two years ago with superficial venous insufficiency. Venous ablation was considered, but my cardiologist informed me that it would probably not improve my condition. Therefore, the best treatment is to wear compression socks and elevate my legs as much as possible. I follow the advice […]]]>

I am a 75 year old male who was diagnosed two years ago with superficial venous insufficiency. Venous ablation was considered, but my cardiologist informed me that it would probably not improve my condition. Therefore, the best treatment is to wear compression socks and elevate my legs as much as possible. I follow the advice of my cardiologist. I recently read a recommendation to take horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) seed extract and look for products that have had the toxicant esculin removed. I discussed it with my cardiologist’s medical assistant and she saw no reason not to try it. What do you think?

A few years ago I saw a well-done study showing horse chestnut extract to be an effective treatment for the swelling associated with venous insufficiency. The usual dose studied was 300 mg of extract, standardized to 50 mg of escin, twice a day. Side effects noted in studies have been both infrequent and mild, and several patients have tried it.

Unfortunately, my patients’ experiences have not been successful. I don’t know if it was just bad luck that I had patients who didn’t respond, or if they didn’t receive effective medication.

A big problem with herbal treatments in the United States, which are sold as dietary supplements, is that purity and standardization cannot be guaranteed. They are not well regulated, compared to pharmaceuticals.

I’m sure there are ethical manufacturers who follow good practices, but the literature on supplements in general has shown that some products on sale do not contain the amount of substance they claim to contain. There is no brand that I feel comfortable recommending.

Nonetheless, I think it’s reasonable to try, especially in combination with standard therapy, which includes daytime compression stockings and at least three sessions of leg elevation above the core for 30 minutes at the time.

My 57 year old son was diagnosed with stage 1 pancreatic cancer. He chose not to have surgery, chemotherapy or radiation therapy. He has his own personal reasons and I respect that. Do you know of any other treatments, such as diet?

Everyone has the right to request or refuse treatment. However, stage 1 pancreatic cancer is potentially curable with surgery, and time is running out. Many people have changed their minds about seeking standard treatment only after an alternative treatment has failed and their disease has progressed.

While I understand your respect for his decision, it is difficult for an outsider like me to see someone being denied a potentially curative treatment for a disease that will likely soon become incurable. Hopefully his decision was made based on a thorough and careful consideration of the facts.

Although healthy diets, herbs, massages and other therapies can help people feel better, there is no evidence that they cure this terrible disease.

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Shettima: Nigeria’s Modern-Day Philosopher King http://www.jewsformorality.org/shettima-nigerias-modern-day-philosopher-king/ Mon, 04 Apr 2022 21:37:05 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/shettima-nigerias-modern-day-philosopher-king/ Shettima: Nigeria’s Modern-Day Philosopher King By Lawan Bukar Maigana “There will be no end to the troubles of states, or of mankind itself, until the philosophers become kings in this world, or until those whom we now call kings and rulers become really and truly philosophers, and that political power and philosophy thus fall into […]]]>

FIRS

Shettima: Nigeria’s Modern-Day Philosopher King

By Lawan Bukar Maigana

“There will be no end to the troubles of states, or of mankind itself, until the philosophers become kings in this world, or until those whom we now call kings and rulers become really and truly philosophers, and that political power and philosophy thus fall into the same hands.
…………. ………………………………………………………………
Until the philosophers are kings, or the kings and princes of this world have the mind and power of philosophy, and political greatness and wisdom meet in one place…the cities do not will never rest from their ills.

– Plato

There are probably millions of Nigerians and billions of people around the world, across generations, who have been inspired by the above immortal lines from Plato’s book titled “The Republic”, which was written around 375 av. But for the purposes of this article let us limit the scope to two eminent Nigerians who lived in two different generations but whose imprints on the sands of time are massive and whose impact on governance, politics, history, literature and body of knowledge can never be forgotten.

One of them is Africa’s greatest storyteller, the late Chinua Achebe, who in his 1983 bestseller “The Trouble with Nigeria” blamed Nigeria’s failure to evolve into a true state- nation, to develop its economy in line with its world-class potential and to rise above mediocrity, on leadership. As far as Achebe is concerned, the failure of the Nigerian wing to fly was due to the unwillingness or failure of management to rise to the occasion and take responsibility for good governance. Achebe said there was nothing wrong with the Nigerian weather, climate, soil, land or water; that leadership is all the country had to fix before it could be taken seriously in the courtesy of serious nations.

Before unveiling the second example of a contemporary Nigerian whose life trajectory and vision resembles what Plato was looking for in leadership, we must fully examine the fundamental ideas behind Plato’s definition of a great leader.

The ancient Greek thinker got the idea for a philosopher-king from his teacher and father of Greek philosophy, Socrates, who defined a philosopher-king as someone who loves and cherishes wisdom, has an unrelenting passion for knowledge of any kind, and is always curious and eager to learn, relearn and unlearn. Above all, Socrates deduced that all true philosophers love truth and curse the consequences of speaking, no matter which ox is gored.

Considered one of the founders of Western philosophy and among the first moral philosophers in the ethical tradition of thought, Socrates went on to explain why philosophers should rule the city. They should do so since they are better able to know the truth and have the relevant practical knowledge to govern.

In the evolution of Western philosophy, Socrates is believed not to have written much, although some of the ideas that were later developed and written down by later philosophers were originally his own. That’s why some of his students like Plato were more famous than him because they wrote a lot about their discoveries and high knowledge about society, humanity, governance, science, etc. Regarding the philosopher-king as well, some of the notable attributes that Plato spoke of came from conversations he had with Socrates, which the former developed with deeper and more practical thoughts.

In “The Republic” of Plato, he writes that the philosopher-king is a leader in whom political skill is combined with philosophical knowledge.

Plato believed that philosophers would be the best leaders of society because they are able to understand true goodness and justice in a way that others cannot. Because they would understand that the greatest personal benefit is to live virtuously, they would act morally and not out of self-interest.

Plato’s ideal state was a republic with three classes of citizens: craftsmen, helpers, and philosopher-kings, each possessing distinct natures and abilities. Moreover, these inclinations reflected a particular combination of elements within his tripartite soul, consisting of appetite, wit, and reason.

Plato’s ideal and just state is an aristocracy, the rule of the best. He believed that rulers should be wise and trained in the management of a state, just as captains of ships are trained in the management of a ship.

To be a native and resident (for many years) of Borno State, watching Shettima speak, inside and outside government, and displaying his depth of knowledge and erudition; to see him embrace brilliant ideas about corporate governance at the state and national levels; to see him put his life on the line and boldly lead the people in the face of adversity and challenge the fearsome terrorists of Boko Haram; seeing him show empathy and prioritize the well-being, safety and security of people; study his sense of fairness and justice, and his understanding of right and wrong; and after reading and digesting Plato’s tried and true idea of ​​the kind of people who should lead people, I was trying to conclude that this man must be a very good example of the great leader that Plato enthusiastically wrote about ages ago centuries. But before I made my thoughts public, Shettima himself said it as if he stole it from my mouth.

Speaking about the secret of his strong relationship with his assiduous successor, Governor Babagana Zulum, in a recent interview with Daily Trust, Shettima called himself a philosopher king who understands the intricacies and pitfalls of power and knows how and when to let go and to let down. others shine when it is their turn instead of trying to eclipse them, and above all, by putting the good of the State above personal interests.

Shettima said, “I am a philosopher-king, and none of the whims of power appeal to me much. In life, as in politics, there are winter years; you go into hibernation and bloom during the summer period. I dominated for eight years, but when a new sheriff came to town, I had to step up to the next level and get off the radar and let him flourish and make the decisions.

There is no doubt that Shettima is indeed a philosopher-king in the mold of the great leader that Plato endorsed. His remarkable eight years in office as Governor of Borno State, the humility and selflessness he brings to his dealings with his successor, the genius he brings to discuss matters of politics and governance , his selfless and fearless pursuit of truth and fairness, and justice and the just direction he wants his party and country to go in the 2023 election, all combine to testify to the above fact that he is indeed a contemporary philosopher-king.

With a philosopher-king like Shettima hovering around politics, the future is bright for Nigeria and Nigerians.

Lawan Bukar Maigana writes from Wuye District Abuja and can be contacted at [email protected]

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KA Nizami Center Lecture Series – Education in India | Latest Education News | World Education News http://www.jewsformorality.org/ka-nizami-center-lecture-series-education-in-india-latest-education-news-world-education-news/ Sun, 03 Apr 2022 06:26:19 +0000 http://www.jewsformorality.org/ka-nizami-center-lecture-series-education-in-india-latest-education-news-world-education-news/ Aligarh: Eminent Islamic scholars from all over the country participated in detailed deliberations on the Holy Quran as compelling literature expressing collective morality, equality, justice, fairness, brotherhood and mercy with guidance for all aspects of life in the recently concluded online extension lecture series of the KA Nizami Center for Quranic Studies, Aligarh Muslim University […]]]>

Aligarh: Eminent Islamic scholars from all over the country participated in detailed deliberations on the Holy Quran as compelling literature expressing collective morality, equality, justice, fairness, brotherhood and mercy with guidance for all aspects of life in the recently concluded online extension lecture series of the KA Nizami Center for Quranic Studies, Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

The series began with a lecture on “How to Understand the Quran” in which Professor Saud Alam Qasmi (Sunni Theology Department) emphasized the importance of reflecting and meditating on Quranic verses.

“The Holy Quran is the final revelation to provide us with the necessary understanding. It is a source of guidance for those who are aware and aware of the existence of God, Professor Saud said.

The more carefully you read the Quran, the more you will understand,” he added.

In the talk on “Quranic Teachings for an Ideal Society”, Professor Tauqueer Alam Falahi (Sunni Theology Department) explained the six Quranic principles for achieving an ideal society.

He talked about the principles of attaining justice and excellence, upholding the rights of relatives, and staying away from immorality, evil, and transgression.

Speaking on the “ethical and social teachings of the Quran”, Professor Obaidullah Fahad (Department of Islamic Studies) explained how the Tazkiyah (Purification) contains guidance on ethical and social aspects.

“The core of the Islamic faith is self-purification, which means that human beings should keep their body and soul clean. A godly person is not one who stands dirty and unkempt, unaware of his surroundings, dress and bodily needs. In fact, cleanliness and the concept of purity have been ingrained in the Muslim psyche, through the instructions of the Quran and the hadiths of the Holy Prophet (peace be upon him) and his practices,” he pointed out.

Professor Zafarul Islam (Department of Islamic Studies) gave a lecture on “A Study of Exegesis and Quranic Studies in the Muslim Era”.

He discussed classic works on the Holy Quran including those of At-Tabari, At-Tusi, Ibn ‘Arabi, Al-Qurtubi, Ibn Kathir, Al-Jalalayn and At-Tabataba’i, among others.

In the talk on “Scientific Temperament and Research in the Light of the Quran,” Prof. Aslam Parvaiz (New Delhi) said, “The Holy Quran urges Muslims to study nature and seek truth. For many Muslim writers, the study of science derives from Tawhid (monotheism). There are prescient statements about scientific phenomena in the Quran which were later confirmed by scientific research, for example regarding the structure of human biology, the solar system and the creation of the universe, among others” .

Maulana Khalid Rasheed Firangi Mahali (Lucknow) gave a speech on “What the Quran demands of Muslims” and stressed the need for a life based on the guidance of the Quran and the “Sunnah”.

Speaking on the ‘Basic Teachings of the Quran’, Maulana Mohammad Fazlur Raheem Mujaddidi (Jaipur) discussed belief, good deeds, morality and life after death.

Professor Akhtarul Wasey (New Delhi) discussed “The Quranic and Islamic Studies Tradition at Aligarh Muslim University and Jamia Millia Islamia”.

UMA’s Dr. Ziauddin delivered a lecture on “A Study of Urdu Exegesis in the Twentieth Century” with references from the works of Sir Syed Ahmad Khan, Allama Hamid Uddin Farahi, Maulana Amin Ahsan Islahi, Maulana Abul Ala Maududi , Maulana Abul Kalam Azad and Abdul Majid Daryabadi.

Dr. Ashhad Jamal Nadvi (Aligarh) spoke of the “Coranic Core Beliefs” – in which he described belief in the unity of God, belief in angels, belief in prophets, belief in scriptures and belief in final judgment.

Dr. M Tariq Ayubi Nadwi (Aligarh) deliberated on ‘Tradition of Quran study in Nadwatul –Uloom and other religious schools‘.

Professor Abdur Raheem Kidwai (Honorary Director, KA Nizami Center for Quranic Studies) convened and moderated the lecture series.

Dr Arshad Iqbal (Program Coordinator) introduced the speakers.

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